Children in Greek Tragedy

Children in Greek Tragedy

Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth.

Author: Emma M. Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198826071

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 393

Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy; Medeia kills her children as an act of vengeance against her husband; Aias reflects with sorrow on his son's inheritance, yet kills himself and leaves Eurysakes vulnerable to his enemies. The pathos created by threats to children is a notable feature of Greek tragedy, but does not in itself explain the broad range of situations in which the ancient playwrights chose to employ such threats. Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth. Although they are largely silent, passive figures on stage, children exert a dramatic force that transcends their limited physical presence, and are in fact theatrically complex creations who pose a danger to the major characters. Their multiple projected lives create dramatic palimpsests which are paradoxically more significant than their immediate emotional effects: children are never killed because of their immediate weakness, but because of their potential strength. This re-evaluation of the significance of child characters in Greek tragedy draws on a fresh examination of the evidence for child actors in fifth-century Athens, which concludes that the physical presence of children was a significant factor in their presentation. However, child roles can only be fully appreciated as theatrical phenomena, utilizing the inherent ambiguities of drama: as such, case studies of particular plays and playwrights are underpinned by detailed analysis of staging considerations, opening up new avenues for interpretation and challenging traditional models of children in tragedy.
Categories: History

Children in Greek Tragedy

Children in Greek Tragedy

In some versions of the myth, the child is saved because of his cries, so he is not a 'muted actor', a reminder that children's voices have power in tragedy beyond their limited onstage roles. 6.5 Children in Greek Literature There are ...

Author: Emma M. Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192560568

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 457

Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy; Medeia kills her children as an act of vengeance against her husband; Aias reflects with sorrow on his son's inheritance, yet kills himself and leaves Eurysakes vulnerable to his enemies. The pathos created by threats to children is a notable feature of Greek tragedy, but does not in itself explain the broad range of situations in which the ancient playwrights chose to employ such threats. Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth. Although they are largely silent, passive figures on stage, children exert a dramatic force that transcends their limited physical presence, and are in fact theatrically complex creations who pose a danger to the major characters. Their multiple projected lives create dramatic palimpsests which are paradoxically more significant than their immediate emotional effects: children are never killed because of their immediate weakness, but because of their potential strength. This re-evaluation of the significance of child characters in Greek tragedy draws on a fresh examination of the evidence for child actors in fifth-century Athens, which concludes that the physical presence of children was a significant factor in their presentation. However, child roles can only be fully appreciated as theatrical phenomena, utilizing the inherent ambiguities of drama: as such, case studies of particular plays and playwrights are underpinned by detailed analysis of staging considerations, opening up new avenues for interpretation and challenging traditional models of children in tragedy.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Laera, M. (2013) Reaching Athens: Community, Democracy and Other Mythologies in Adaptations of Greek Tragedy. Frankfurt am Main. (2014) Theatre and Adaptation: Return, Rewrite, Repeat. London. (2015) 'On Killing Children: Greek ...

Author: Vayos Liapis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107155701

Category: Art

Page: 447

View: 617

Shows how contemporary adaptations, on the stage and on the page, can breathe new life into Greek tragedy.
Categories: Art

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

An episode widely and rightly regarded as comic is the arming of Iolaus in Euripides' Children of Heracles. Whereas other versions of the myth associate him with Heracles' generation, Euripides' Iolaus is the same age as Alcmene.

Author: Justina Gregory

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405175494

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 578

View: 479

The Blackwell Companion to Greek Tragedy provides readers with a fundamental grounding in Greek tragedy, and also introduces them to the various methodologies and the lively critical dialogue that characterize the study of Greek tragedy today. Comprises 31 original essays by an international cast of contributors, including up-and-coming as well as distinguished senior scholars Pays attention to socio-political, textual, and performance aspects of Greek tragedy All ancient Greek is transliterated and translated, and technical terms are explained as they appear Includes suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter, and a generous and informative combined bibliography
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Reception of Ancient Greece and Rome in Children s Literature

The Reception of Ancient Greece and Rome in Children   s Literature

Hall, Edith, “Towards a Theory of Performance Reception,” in Edith Hall and Stephe Harrop, eds., Theorising Performance: Greek Drama, Cultural History and Critical Practice (London: Duckworth, 2010a) 10–28. Hall, Edith, Greek Tragedy: ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004298606

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 358

View: 459

The Reception of Ancient Greece and Rome in Children’s Literature: Heroes and Eagles investigates the varying receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome in children’s literature, covering the genres of historical fiction, fantasy, mystery stories and classical mythology, and considering the ideological manipulations in these works.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Greek - American newspapers ( May Subd Geog ) BT American newspapers Greek newspapers Greek American theater ( May Subd ... Modern [ PA32387 Greek drama , Modern May Subd Geog ) BT Greek literature , Modern NT Children's plays , Greek ...

Author: Library of Congress

Publisher:

ISBN: PSU:000021654282

Category: Subject headings, Library of Congress

Page:

View: 672

Categories: Subject headings, Library of Congress

Greek Drama

Greek Drama

The problem here is that children in Greek tragedy are normally mute . Astyanax has no words to say , nor do the children of Heracles when faced with death at the hands of Lycus . In Oedipus the King , Antigone and Ismene are there only ...

Author: Grace Lucile Beede

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015008228622

Category: Greek drama

Page: 75

View: 604

Categories: Greek drama

Women in Greek Tragedy

Women in Greek Tragedy

This is significant , for children seldom appear in Greek tragedy and if they do their role is crucial to the action . They should , therefore , not be overlooked as mere foils to the nurse . In addition , there follows an impressive ...

Author: Synnøve Des Bouvrie

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 8200211258

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 426

This work springs from a feminist inquiry into the role of women in Ancient Greece. The author confronts the paradox that while women were nearly invisible in public life, they played a very prominent part on the tragic stage. The book offers a thorough examination of the tragic drama and defines this medium, in an anthropological sense, as a "symbolic phenomenon," concluding that the phenomenon presents the social order and its basic institutions. The special interest of this study lies in its theoretical orientation. Drawing extensively on anthropological literature on symbolism as well as on Aristotle's Poetics, the author offers a model for analysis. Her starting point is the emotional or "tragic" workings of tragic drama, involving an inversion of the symbolic or world order. The method is then applied to eight dramas staging prominent women, providing insights which will prove useful to the study of Greek tragedy in general.
Categories: History

Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy

Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy

... irrationally 'hates' her children (36, 89–95, 98–118) and is contemplating the murder of Creon and Jason (39–45). ... litigation and in the preAreopagan environment of Greek tragedies such as Sophocles' Electra they would have been ...

Author: Stuart Lawrence

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780199659760

Category: Drama

Page: 347

View: 200

Lawrence's volume provides a detailed discussion and analyses of the moral awareness of major characters in Greek tragedy, focusing particularly on the characters' recognition of moral issues and crises, their ability to reflect on them, and their consciousness of doing so. Beginning with a definition of morality and examining the implications of analysing the moral performance of fictional characters, Lawrence considers concepts of the self and the problem of autonomy and personal responsibility in the context of divine intervention, which is a crucial feature of the genre. The volume then moves on to the individual plays (Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes and Oresteia; Sophocles' Ajax, Trachiniae, Oedipus Tyrannus, Electra, and Philoctetes; and Euripides' Medea, Hecuba, Hippolytus, Heracles, Electra, and Bacchae), focusing in each case on a crisis or crises faced by a major character and examining the background which led to it. Lawrence then considers the individual character's moral response and relates it to the critical issues formulated in the volume's opening discussions. The book will be important to any student of Classical Studies and those in Philosophy or Literature interested in a theoretical discussion of the morality of literary characters.
Categories: Drama