Catholicism and Community in Early Modern England

Catholicism and Community in Early Modern England

A study of the political, religious and mental worlds of the Catholic aristocracy from 1550 to 1640,

Author: Michael C. Questier

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521860086

Category: History

Page: 559

View: 126

A study of the political, religious and mental worlds of the Catholic aristocracy from 1550 to 1640,
Categories: History

Oral Culture and Catholicism in Early Modern England

Oral Culture and Catholicism in Early Modern England

This book is an important contribution to the rediscovery of the writings and culture of the Catholic community and will be of great interest to scholars of early modern literature, history and theology.

Author: Alison Shell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139469067

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 820

After the Reformation, England's Catholics were marginalised and excluded from using printed media for propagandist ends. Instead, they turned to oral media, such as ballads and stories, to plead their case and maintain contact with their community. Building on the growing interest in Catholic literature which has developed in early modern studies, Alison Shell examines the relationship between Catholicism and oral culture from the mid-sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. In order to recover the textual traces of this minority culture, she expands canonical boundaries, looking at anecdotes, spells and popular verse alongside more conventionally literary material. In her archival research she uncovers many important manuscript sources. This book is an important contribution to the rediscovery of the writings and culture of the Catholic community and will be of great interest to scholars of early modern literature, history and theology.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Church Papists

Church Papists

A study of clerical reaction to the sizeable number of Catholics who outwardly conformed to Protestantism in late 16c England.

Author: Alexandra Walsham

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 0851157572

Category: History

Page: 142

View: 343

A study of clerical reaction to the sizeable number of Catholics who outwardly conformed to Protestantism in late 16c England. An important and satisfying monograph... Many insights emerge from this rich and original study, whichwhets the appetite for more. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW [Diarmaid MacCulloch]
Categories: History

Early Modern English Catholicism

Early Modern English Catholicism

Early Modern English Catholicism: Identity, Memory and Counter-Reformation is an interdisciplinary collection that brings together leading scholars in the field to demonstrate the significance of early modern English Catholicism as a ...

Author: James E. Kelly

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004325678

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 220

Early Modern English Catholicism: Identity, Memory and Counter-Reformation is an interdisciplinary collection that brings together leading scholars in the field to demonstrate the significance of early modern English Catholicism as a contributor to national and European Counter-Reformation culture.
Categories: History

Communities in Early Modern England

Communities in Early Modern England

The essays offer an original, comparative, and thematic approach to the many ways in which people utilized communication, space, and symbols to constitute communities in early modern England.

Author: Peter Lake

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 071905477X

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 338

How were cultural, political, and social identities formed in the early modern period? How were they maintained? What happened when they were contested? What meanings did “community” have? This path-breaking book looks at how individuals were bound into communities by religious, professional, and social networks; the importance of place--ranging from the Parish to communities of crime; and the value of rhetoric in generating community--from the King’s English to the use of “public” as a rhetorical community. The essays offer an original, comparative, and thematic approach to the many ways in which people utilized communication, space, and symbols to constitute communities in early modern England.
Categories: History

Redrawing the Map of Early Modern English Catholicism

Redrawing the Map of Early Modern English Catholicism

The contributors to this volume – all leading or rising scholars of early modern studies – conceptualize English Catholicism as a hazardous series of contested territories divided by shifting boundaries, requiring Catholics to navigate ...

Author: Lowell Gallagher

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442695498

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 769

The tumultuous climate of early modern England had a profound effect on its Catholic population's domestic life, social customs, literary inventions, and political arguments. Redrawing the Map of Early Modern English Catholicism explores the broad spectrum of the early modern English Catholic experience, presenting fresh and often startling assessments of the most problematic topics in post-Reformation English Catholicism. The contributors to this volume – all leading or rising scholars of early modern studies – conceptualize English Catholicism as a hazardous series of contested territories divided by shifting boundaries, requiring Catholics to navigate with vigilance and diplomacy their status as 'insiders' or 'outsiders.' This collection also presents new ways to understand the connections between reformist and Catholic inflections in the emerging canon of English poetry, despite the eventual marginalization of Catholic poets in English literary history. Redrawing the Map of Early Modern English Catholicism ably demonstrates the profoundly experimental as well as recuperative character of early modern English Catholicism.
Categories: Religion

Women Reform and Community in Early Modern England

Women  Reform and Community in Early Modern England

A study of one of the most influential women of her day has much to reveal about the developments which shaped the English Reformation.

Author: Melissa Franklin-Harkrider

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 1843833654

Category: Religion

Page: 174

View: 611

A study of one of the most influential women of her day has much to reveal about the developments which shaped the English Reformation.
Categories: Religion

Women Identities and Communities in Early Modern Europe

Women  Identities and Communities in Early Modern Europe

Addressing a key challenge facing feminist scholars today, this volume explores the tensions between shared gender identity and the myriad social differences structuring women's lives.

Author: Stephanie Tarbin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351871631

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 779

Addressing a key challenge facing feminist scholars today, this volume explores the tensions between shared gender identity and the myriad social differences structuring women's lives. By examining historical experiences of early modern women, the authors of these essays consider the possibilities for commonalities and the forces dividing women. They analyse individual and collective identities of early modern women, tracing the web of power relations emerging from women's social interactions and contemporary understandings of femininity. Essays range from the late medieval period to the eighteenth century, study women in England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Sweden, and locate women in a variety of social environments, from household, neighbourhood and parish, to city, court and nation. Despite differing local contexts, the volume highlights continuities in women's experiences and the gendering of power relations across the early modern world. Recognizing the critical power of gender to structure identities and experiences, this collection responds to the challenge of the complexity of early modern women's lives. In paying attention to the contexts in which women identified with other women, or were seen by others to identify, contributors add new depth to our understanding of early modern women's senses of exclusion and belonging.
Categories: History

Catholic Culture in Early Modern England

Catholic Culture in Early Modern England

This collection of essays explores the survival of Catholic culture in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England--a time of Protestant domination and sometimes persecution.

Author: Ronald Corthell

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066420608

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 434

This collection of essays explores the survival of Catholic culture in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England--a time of Protestant domination and sometimes persecution. Contributors examine not only devotional, political, autobiographical, and other written texts, but also material objects such as church vestments, architecture, and symbolic spaces. Among the topics discussed in this volume are the influence of Latin culture on Catholic women, Marian devotion, the activities of Catholics in continental seminaries and convents, the international context of English Catholicism, and the influential role of women as maintainers of Catholic culture in a hostile religious and political environment. Catholic Culture in Early Modern England makes an important contribution to the ongoing project of historians and literary scholars to rewrite the cultural history of post-Reformation English Catholicism. "This collection contains cutting-edge research on a topic that has, until recently, been shockingly unrecognized and under-studied in the academic mainstream. This is a timely publication and one bound to prove a key point of reference in the future. " --Alison Shell, University of Durham "In recent years, English Catholicism has emerged as one of the most richly provocative and productive veins of scholarship and critical inquiry in Early Modern studies. Catholic Culture in Early Modern England shows why this is so. The editors have assembled a well-balanced and wide-ranging collection of essays that impressively demonstrates how the question of what counts as English Catholic experience opens up fresh perspectives on the nature and scope of confessional and political identity and, more broadly, on the meaning of culture itself in relation to the diaspora that left its mark not only on early modern religious and social space but also on gender roles, aesthetic practice, and the uses of symbolic forms." --Lowell Gallagher, UCLA "Catholic Culture in Early Modern England is a well-considered contribution to the ongoing re-evaluation of post-Reformation English Catholicism and early modern history. The judicious introduction appropriately locates the essays in the wider context of contemporary scholarship and places them in relation to each other. The essays themselves shed light on familiar figures (Queen Henrietta Maria, William Alabaster, John Gerard, William Allen, and Robert Persons) as well as on unfamiliar ones (Helena Wintour and Barbara Constable). Some illuminate Catholic institutions, cultural practices, and individual works. All in all, this is a timely, thoughtful, and valuable collection." --Robert S. Miola, Gerard Manley Hopkins Professor, Loyola College "English Catholics lived among their Protestant neighbors, but they had cultural practices that identified them as Catholics, gave them a sense of community, and quietly asserted their values. These articles do a fine job of opening up the mental and physical worlds they created and represented in their gardens, houses, needlework, conversion narratives and high literature. Tied to international Catholicism, English Catholics lived within a sophisticated culture made more complex by secrecy." --Norman Jones, Utah State University
Categories: History

Getting Along

Getting Along

Examining the impact of the English and European Reformations on social interaction and community harmony, this volume simultaneously highlights the tension and degree of accommodation amongst ordinary people when faced with religious and ...

Author: Adam Morton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317128328

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 355

Examining the impact of the English and European Reformations on social interaction and community harmony, this volume simultaneously highlights the tension and degree of accommodation amongst ordinary people when faced with religious and social upheaval. Building on previous literature which has characterised the progress of the Reformation as 'slow' and 'piecemeal', this volume furthers our understanding of the process of negotiation at the most fundamental social and political levels - in the family, the household, and the parish. The essays further research in the field of religious toleration and social interaction in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in both Britain and the wider European context. The contributors are amongst the leading researchers in the fields of religious toleration and denominational history, and their essays combine new archival research with current debates in the field. Additionally, the collection seeks to celebrate the career of Professor Bill Sheils, Head of the Department of History at the University of York, for his on-going contributions to historians' understanding of non-conformity (both Catholic and Protestant) in Reformation and post-Reformation England.
Categories: History

Catholic Social Networks in Early Modern England

Catholic Social Networks in Early Modern England

This book contributes to recent scholarship on religious persecution and coexistence in post-Reformation Europe by demonstrating how English Catholics shaped state policy and enforcement of religious minorities and helped to define the ...

Author: Susan M. Cogan

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048552887

Category: Architecture

Page:

View: 512

Catholic Social Networks in Early Modern England: Kinship, Gender, and Coexistence explores the lived experience of Catholic women and men in the post-Reformation century. Set against the background of the gendered dynamics of English society, this book demonstrates that English Catholics were potent forces in the shaping of English culture, religious policy, and the emerging nation-state. Drawing on kinship and social relationships rooted in the medieval period, post-Reformation English Catholic women and men used kinship, social networks, gendered strategies, political actions, and cultural activities like architecture and gardening to remain connected to patrons and to ensure the survival of their families through a period of deep social and religious change. This book contributes to recent scholarship on religious persecution and coexistence in post-Reformation Europe by demonstrating how English Catholics shaped state policy and enforcement of religious minorities and helped to define the character of early models of citizenship formation.
Categories: Architecture

Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland

After the accession of the Protestant Elizabeth, the Catholic imagining of England was mainly the project of the exiles who had left their homeland in search of religious toleration and foreign assistance."--BOOK JACKET.

Author: Christopher Highley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199533404

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 268

In contrast to recent studies that treat Catholics only as a despised 'other' against which British Protestant narratives of the nation were constructed, this book examines the ways in which Catholic writers between the reigns of Mary Tudor and James I fashioned their own competing discourses of national and cultural identity. The book considers a broad range of non-canonical material produced by a diverse Catholic community in both print and manuscript: religiouspolemic, ecclesiastical histories, martyrologies, and correspondence. Scholars like Thomas Stapleton, 'intelligencers' like Richard Verstegan, secular priests like William Allen, and Jesuits like Robert Persons helped shape debates about national identity both in response to Protestant polemic andas part of intra-Catholic rivalries that pitted various factions against each other, including expatriates from England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. Finally, this study focuses on how Catholics' experience of exile from 'home' conditioned their alternative writing of the nation.
Categories: History

Art Literature and Religion in Early Modern Sussex

Art  Literature and Religion in Early Modern Sussex

This volume extends work done in the 1960s and 70s on early-modern Sussex, drawing on new work on county and religious identities, and setting it into a broad national context.

Author: Andrew Hadfield

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317178385

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 694

Art, Literature and Religion in Early Modern Sussex is an interdisciplinary study of a county at the forefront of religious, political and artistic developments in early-modern England. Ranging from the schism of Reformation to the outbreak of Civil War, the volume brings together scholars from the fields of art history, religious and intellectual history and English literature to offer new perspectives on early-modern Sussex. Essays discuss a wide variety of topics: the coherence of a county divided between East and West and Catholic and Protestant; the art and literary collections of Chichester cathedral; communities of Catholic gentry; Protestant martyrdom; aristocratic education; writing, preaching and exile; local funerary monuments; and the progresses of Elizabeth I. Contributors include Michael Questier; Nigel Llewellyn; Caroline Adams; Karen Coke; and Andrew Foster. The collection concludes with an Afterword by Duncan Salkeld (University of Chichester). This volume extends work done in the 1960s and 70s on early-modern Sussex, drawing on new work on county and religious identities, and setting it into a broad national context. The result is a book that not only tells us much about Sussex, but which also has a great deal to offer all scholars working in the field of local and regional history, and religious change in England as a whole.
Categories: History

Confessional Mobility and English Catholics in Counter Reformation Europe

Confessional Mobility and English Catholics in Counter Reformation Europe

Corens proposes a new interpretative model of 'confessional mobility'. She opens up the debate to include pilgrims, grand tour travellers, students, and mobile scholars alongside exiles.

Author: Liesbeth Corens

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198812432

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 544

In the wake of England's break with Rome and gradual reformation, English Catholics took root outside of the country, in Catholic countries across Europe. Their arrival and the foundation of convents and colleges on the Continent as attracted scholarly attention. However, we need to understand their impact beyond that initial moment of change. Confessional Mobility, therefore, looks at the continued presence of English Catholics abroad and how the English Catholic community was shaped by these cross-Channel connections. Corens proposes a new interpretative model of 'confessional mobility'. She opens up the debate to include pilgrims, grand tour travellers, students, and mobile scholars alongside exiles. The diversity of mobility highlights that those abroad were never cut off or isolated on the Continent. Rather, through correspondence and constant travel, they created a community without borders. This cross-Channel community was not defined by its status as victims of persecution, but provided the lifeblood for English Catholics for generations. Confessional Mobility also incorporates minority Catholics more closely into the history of the Counter-Reformation. Long side-lined as exceptions to the rule of a hierarchical, triumphant, territorial Catholic Church, English Catholic have seldom been recognised as an instrumental part in the wider Counter-Reformation. Attention to movement and mission in the understanding of Catholics incorporates minority Catholics alongside extra-European missions and reinforces current moves to decentre Counter-Reformation scholarship.
Categories: History

The Trials of Margaret Clitherow

The Trials of Margaret Clitherow

Thoroughly updated with newly discovered archival material, this second edition of The Trials of Margaret Clitherow demonstrates that the complicated and controversial life story of Margaret Clitherow is not as unique as it was once thought ...

Author: Peter Lake

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350049284

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 979

Thoroughly updated with newly discovered archival material, this second edition of The Trials of Margaret Clitherow demonstrates that the complicated and controversial life story of Margaret Clitherow is not as unique as it was once thought. In fact, Peter Lake and Michael Questier argue that her case was comparable to those of other separatist females who were in trouble with the law at the same time, in particular Anne Foster, also of York. In doing so, they shed new light on the fascinating stories of these unruly women whose fates have been excluded from Catholic and women narratives of the period. The result is a work which considers the questions of religious sainthood and martyrdom through a gender lens, providing important insights into the relationship between society, the state and the church in Britain during the 16th century. This is a major contribution to our understanding of both English Catholicism and the Protestant regime of the Elizabethan period.
Categories: History

English Catholicism 1558 1642

English Catholicism  1558 1642

Newly revised and updated, the second edition of English Catholicism 1558-1642 explores the position of Catholics in early modern English society, their political significance, and the internal politics of the Catholic community.

Author: Alan Dures

Publisher:

ISBN: 0367672324

Category: Catholics

Page: 208

View: 464

"Newly revised and updated, the second edition of English Catholicism 1558-1642 explores the position of Catholics in early modern English society, their political significance, and the internal politics of the Catholic community. Co-authored with Francis Young, this volume has been updated to include recent developments in the historiography of English Catholicism. It is a useful introduction for all undergraduate students interested in the English Reformation and early modern English history"--
Categories: Catholics

The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England

The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England

... Catholicism and Community in Early Modern England: Politics, Aristocratic Patronage and Religion, c.1550–1640 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

Author: Andrew Gordon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317044352

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 824

The early modern period inherited a deeply-ingrained culture of Christian remembrance that proved a platform for creativity in a remarkable variety of forms. From the literature of church ritual to the construction of monuments; from portraiture to the arrangement of domestic interiors; from the development of textual rites to drama of the contemporary stage, the early modern world practiced 'arts of remembrance' at every turn. The turmoils of the Reformation and its aftermath transformed the habits of creating through remembrance. Ritually observed and radically reinvented, remembrance was a focal point of the early modern cultural imagination for an age when beliefs both crossed and divided communities of the faithful. The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England maps the new terrain of remembrance in the post-Reformation period, charting its negotiations with the material, the textual and the performative.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Almshouses in Early Modern England

Almshouses in Early Modern England

109 M. C. Questier, Catholicism and Community in Early Modern England: Politics, Aristocratic Patronage and Religion, c.1550–1640 (Cambridge, 2006), pp.

Author: Angela Nicholls

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781783271788

Category: Almshouses

Page: 278

View: 889

This book is an examination of early modern English almshouses in the 'mixed economy' of welfare. Drawing on archival evidence from three contrasting counties - Durham, Warwickshire and Kent - between 1550 and 1725, the book assesses the contribution almshouses made within the developing welfare systems of the time and the reasons for the enduring popularity of this particular form of charity. Post-Reformation almshouses are usually considered to have been places of privilege for the respectable deserving poor, operating outside the structure of parish poor relief to which ordinary poor people were subjected, and making little contribution to the genuinely poor and needy. This book challenges these assumptions through an exploration of the nature and extent of almshouse provision; it examines why almshouses were founded in the late-sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, who the occupants were, what benefits they received and how residents were expected to live their lives. The book reveals a surprising variation in the socio-economic status of almspeople and their experience of almshouse life.
Categories: Almshouses

The Trials of Margaret Clitherow

The Trials of Margaret Clitherow

New biography of a Catholic martyr exploring the complicated and controversial story of her demise.

Author: Peter Lake

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780826431530

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 878

This is a new biography of a Catholic martyr exploring the complicated and controversial story of her demise. The story of Margaret Clitherow represents one of the most important yet troubling events in post-Reformation history. Her trial, execution and subsequent legend have provoked controversy ever since it became a cause celebre in the time of Elizabeth I. Through extensive new research into the contemporary accounts of her arrest and trial the authors have pieced together a new reading of the surrounding events. The result is a work which considers the question of religious sainthood and martyrdom as well as the relationship between society, the state and the Church in Britain during the C16th. They establish the full ideological significance of the trial and demonstrate that the politics of post-Reformation British society cannot be understood without the wider local, national and international contexts in which they occurred. This is a major contribution to our understanding of both English Catholicism and the Protestant regime of the Elizabethan period.
Categories: History

Reading and politics in early modern England

Reading and politics in early modern England

The mental world of a seventeenth-century Catholic gentleman Geoff Baker ... that there was a discernible Catholic community in early modern England was ...

Author: Geoff Baker

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781847797544

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 560

This book examines the activities of William Blundell, a seventeenth-century Catholic gentleman, and using the approaches of the history of reading, provides a detailed analysis of his mindset. Blundell was neither the passive victim nor the entirely loyal subject that he and others have claimed. He actively defended his family from the penal laws and used the relative freedom that this gave him to patronise other Catholics. Not only did he rewrite the histories of recent civil conflicts to show that Protestants were prone to rebellion and Catholics to loyalty, but we also find a different perspective on his religious beliefs. Blundell’s commonplaces suggest an underlying tension with aspects of Catholicism, a tension manifest throughout his notes on his practical engagement with the world, in which it is clear that he was wrestling with the various aspects of his identity. This is an important study that will be of interest to all who work on the early modern period.
Categories: History