British Embassies

Their Diplomatic and Architectural History

Author: James Stourton

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 1781012431

Category: Architecture

Page: 352

View: 1492

A unique and glamorous book about British Imperial and post-Imperial architecture and a lively and evocative read for anyone interested in the international projection of British power and culture. British Embassies have a special role in our history. They represent our country in bricks and stone and have often expressed – at least in the eyes of foreigners – our national character. Whether they are Lutyens buildings in Washington, grand palaces in Europe, beautiful old colonial buildings in Asia, or secure compounds in the Middle East, they all have stories to tell and reveal the changing face of British diplomacy. A mixture of history, architectural description, diplomacy and anecdote, this large format picture book covers Residences and embassies in twenty-six countries to provide an authoritative text, accompanied by newly commissioned photography.
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Embassies in the East

The Story of the British and Their Embassies in China, Japan and Korea from 1859 to the Present

Author: J E Hoare,J. E. Hoare

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113679624X

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 1425

This text traces the history of three Far Eastern embassies through the vicissitudes of war and revolution against the background of an apparent steady decline of Western influence in Asia. Dr Hoare tracks the key events and people shaping the British view of Asia. Key 'dramatis personae' are Sir Harry Parkes, British Minister to Japan, China and Korea; Sir Ernest Satow, the student interpreter who became Minister in Tokyo and Peking, and in more recent years, Sir Charles Eliot, lover of big cars and scholar of Buddhism. This book will interest those wishing to know more about all aspects of Britain in East Asia, whether in the tense years of the Boxer troubles in China, during the wartime repatriation of Britons from Japan and the Japanese Empire, in the traumas of the Korean War, or during the excess of China's Cultural Revolution.
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British Diplomacy in Turkey

1583 to the Present ; a Study in the Evolution of the Resident Embassy

Author: G. R. Berridge

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 900417639X

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 7341

Since the early twentieth century the resident embassy has been supposed to be living on borrowed time. By means of an exhaustive historical account of the contribution of the British Embassy in Turkey to Britain s diplomatic relationship with that state, this book shows this to be false. Part A analyses the evolution of the embassy as a working unit up to the First World War: the buildings, diplomats, dragomans, consular network, and communications. Part B examines how, without any radical changes except in its communications, it successfully met the heavy demands made on it in the following century, for example by playing a key role in a multitude of bilateral negotiations and providing cover to secret agents and drugs liaison officers.
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The British Diplomatic Service, 1815-1914

1815-1914

Author: Raymond Jones

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 0889201242

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 3710

Previous accounts of the British Foreign Office have left the impression that the diplomatic service was an insignificant appendage of the Foreign Office. Jones's study redresses the balance, demonstrating that the diplomatic service was an equal if not senior partner with the Foreign Office in the execution of British foreign policy. After a brief introduction to the history of diplomacy, Jones follows the changes wrought in the service by the intense political and social pressures of the nineteenth century. Against the background of the growth of the Victorian Civil Service and the emergence of Great Britain as a world power in the age of the Pax Britannica, Jones traces the demise of the family embassy, and of a diplomacy deeply rooted in patronage, and the corresponding development of the professional, bureaucratic elite of the Edwardian era. In case studies of the Near Eastern crisis of 1839-41, the Mason Sliddell Affair of the American Civil War, and the Dogger Bank Crisis of 1904, the volume sets forth the working environment of an embassy, both before and after the communications revolution following upon the introduction of the telegraph. Also examined are the social structures of the unreformed diplomatic service and the later, professional service. The volume will be of interest to historians of diplomacy and foreign policy, to political scientists, and to students of social change.
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An Historical and Descriptive Account of China

Its Ancient and Modern History, Language, Literature, Religion, Government, Industry, Manners, and Social State; Intercourse with Europe from the Earliest Ages; Missions and Embassies to the Imperial Court; British and Foreign Commerce; Directions to Navigators; State of Mathematics and Astronomy; Survey of Its Geography, Geology, Botany, and Zoology

Author: Hugh Murray,John Crawfurd,Peter Gordon,Thomas Lynn,William Wallace,Gilbert Thomas Burnett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: China

Page: N.A

View: 3522

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The British Defence of Egypt, 1935-40

Conflict and Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean

Author: Steve Morewood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135776660

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 2639

A comprehensive and challenging analysis of the British defence of Egypt, primarily against fascist Italy, in the critical lead-up period to the Second World War. Culminating in the decisive defeat of the Italian military threat at Sidi Barrani in December 1940, this is a fascinating new contribution to the field. The security of Egypt, a constant of British imperial strategy, is a curiously neglected dimension of the still burning appeasement debate. Steven Morewood adds to the originality of his interpretation by suggesting the old view should be reinstated: that Mussolini should and could have been stopped in his empire-building at the Abyssinian hurdle. Thereafter, as Nazi Germany tore the Versailles peace settlement to shreds, the drift to war accelerated as British resolve and credibility were brought into question. The fascist dictators in Rome and Berlin held no respect for weakness and Mussolini became the conduit through which Hitler could apply pressure to a sensitive British interest through reinforcing Libya at critical moments.
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The British Defence of Egypt, 1935-1940

Conflict and Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean

Author: Steven Morewood

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780714649436

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 3386

A comprehensive and challenging analysis of the British defence of Egypt, primarily against fascist Italy, in the critical lead-up period to the Second World War. Culminating in the decisive defeat of the Italian military threat at Sidi Barrani in December 1940, this is a fascinating new contribution to the field. The security of Egypt, a constant of British imperial strategy, is a curiously neglected dimension of the still burning appeasement debate. Steven Morewood adds to the originality of his interpretation by suggesting the old view should be reinstated: that Mussolini should and could have been stopped in his empire-building at the Abyssinian hurdle. Thereafter, as Nazi Germany tore the Versailles peace settlement to shreds, the drift to war accelerated as British resolve and credibility were brought into question. The fascist dictators in Rome and Berlin held no respect for weakness and Mussolini became the conduit through which Hitler could apply pressure to a sensitive British interest through reinforcing Libya at critical moments.
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