Brighton at War 1939 45

Brighton at War 1939 45

This is not the first book to reveal the toll of the bombs locally, but it is the first to describe, in parallel, day-to-day events and societal responses during the nearly six years of conflict.

Author: Douglas d'Enno

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

ISBN: 1473885930

Category:

Page: 224

View: 117

Long before war was declared on 3 September 1939, Brighton had steadily and carefully prepared for the coming conflict by building shelters, organising defence and rescue services, and providing the population with advice of its own or from government sources. These precautions stood the town in good stead when the first bombs fell on it in mid-1940 and during the many subsequent attacks. The resort did not, admittedly, suffer as grievously as some others on the South Coast, yet civilian casualties totalled nearly 1,000, of whom over 200 were killed, 357 were seriously injured and 433 slightly injured. This is not the first book to reveal the toll of the bombs locally, but it is the first to describe, in parallel, day-to-day events and societal responses during the nearly six years of conflict. As elsewhere, restrictions often made life arduous for residents. Yet despite the hardship, the town's citizens even marshalled sufficient resources to 'adopt' two battleships and generously saved towards assisting with other wartime causes, such as help to our ally, Russia. The hospitality trade and resort-related services suffered greatly during the periods when the defence ban on entering the town was enforced. In many respects, however, life went on largely as before, particularly in the spheres of entertainment, leisure and some sports. Douglas d'Enno, an authority on the history of Brighton and environs, shows in meticulous detail, in absorbing text and numerous pictures, how life in wartime Brighton was a struggle for many, but never dull.
Categories:

Reading at War 1939 45

Reading at War 1939   45

For the better off, Smith's coaches were still running trips to Brighton, Hindhead, Bournemouth and Whipsnade Zoo. There was always greyhound racing on ...

Author: David Bilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781473891043

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 427

As in the Great War, Reading in the Second World War was a town permanently in a state of flux. So close to London, so easily pinpointed by its proximity to the Thames, with railway lines converging near the town centre and with much of the town’s industry geared up to essential war work, it was an obvious target for the German Luftwaffe when the war broke out. Knowing this, the council had set up an efficient Civil Defence system aided by government finance. Fortunately for the citizens, although they were bombed on many occasions, only one raid had any significant impact. The book covers the daily life of a town ready for the worst, but one that continued with its daily life and just got on with its efforts to aid the war effort. The book is profusely illustrated with photographs, illustrations and human interest stories. Much of the material used has not been seen since the war so it provides a valuable and unique insight into daily life of the town.
Categories: History

Sussex at War 1939 45

Sussex at War  1939   45

From the Dunkirk evacuation, Sussex became a front-line County and a likely invasion area if the German's launched their feared attack.This book takes an in depth look at the fortification of the County, the plight of the evacuees who were ...

Author: Clifford Mewett

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473855601

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 690

From the Dunkirk evacuation, Sussex became a front-line County and a likely invasion area if the German's launched their feared attack.This book takes an in depth look at the fortification of the County, the plight of the evacuees who were hurriedly moved from London to escape the threat of the capital being bombed and who were re-evacuated when German air attacks caused much damage and loss of life. The Luftwaffe's tip and run raids were particularly feared.Many thousands of Canadian troops were stationed in Sussex, from where they launched the disastrous raid on Dieppe. Sussex was also heavily involved in the build up to D Day and suffering badly from the much feared Doodlebugs, Hitler's revenge weapon.When victory was secured in 1945 Sussex celebrated as Prisoners of War came home and soldiers, sailors and airmen were demobbed.Sussex at War 1939–1945 also looks at the role played by the civilian population, voluntary organisations and the spirit of defiance which swept the County.If you are interested in wartime Sussex history, local history of the second world war or Britain's war effort and life on the home front, then this is the book for you.
Categories: History

Hampshire at War 1939 45

Hampshire at War  1939   45

Towards the end of the war Cockatrice was involved in occupying the German ... one of the officers with whom he had served on HMS Brighton who was about to ...

Author: Murray Rowlands

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473869981

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 535

Hampshire at War 1939-45 looks at the pivotal role Hampshire played during the Second World War, including principal details of the genesis for D-Day and how the Battle for Britain happened on a day by day basis. The author highlights the peoples experience of total war from the blitz in Portsmouth, Gosport and Southampton, along with raids throughout the county, not to mention the role played by the Royal Navy at sea and in the dockyards. As well as saluting the role of civilians who created and built Spitfires and Hurricanes, the book places a rightful spotlight on the role Hampshire's women played in the final victory.Hampshires major effort towards final victory arose from the towns and hamlets of the county. Training for the secret war and espionage took place in Beaulieu and the training for the Cockleshell Heroes took place around Southsea. Hampshires war involved the arrival of men and women from all over the world, but in particular from Canada and America with important cultural changes for everyone living there. When invasion threatened in 1940, a defence of Britain had to be organised and Hampshire's coast was particularly vulnerable. Details of how German troops would be resisted after landings in the Solent and along Hampshires coast are also explored.Hampshire at War 1939 - 1945 traces the progress of evacuating its children from vulnerable cities such as Southampton and Portsmouth, and records the experiences of the children themselves. But most importantly, Murray Rowlands provides the experience of living through the Second World War, as it happened.
Categories: History

City of London at War 1939 45

City of London at War 1939   45

been unable to confirm exactly where he was buried. Alfred John Dunkeyson was 18 years of age and lived at 48 Brighton Road, Stoke Newington.

Author: Stephen Wynn

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526708328

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 402

A photo-filled history of how London’s historic business district endured the Blitz during World War II, and emerged to thrive once again. The City of London was an obvious target for German bombers during the Second World War. What better way for Nazi Germany to spread fear and panic amongst the British people than by attacking their central business district? Although it wasn’t densely populated, there were still enough people working there during the day for attacks on it to take their toll. The city’s ancient and iconic buildings also bore the brunt of the German bombs, including churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire in 1666. The book looks at the effects of war on the City of London, including the damage caused by the eight months of the Blitz between September 1940 and May 1941. The most devastating of the raids took place on December 29, 1940, with both incendiary and explosive bombs causing a firestorm so intense it was known as the Second Great Fire of London. It also looks at the bravery of the staff at St Bart’s Hospital, which was one of the medical facilities that remained open during the course of the war. Other stories include the sterling work carried out by the City’s civilian population and the voluntary roles that they performed to help keep the city safe, including the Home Guard and the Fire Watchers, who spent their nights on the city’s rooftops looking out for incendiary devices dropped by the Luftwaffe. Ultimately, despite the damage to its buildings and population, by the end of the war the City of London was able to rise, like a phoenix, from the flames of destruction, ready to become the vibrant and flourishing borough that it is today.
Categories: History

Cambridgeshire at War 1939 45

Cambridgeshire at War 1939   45

A Spitfire, flown by a young Brighton pilot, Harold Penketh, crashed into the ... is a small on-site memorial to him acknowledging his sacrifice to the war.

Author: Glynis Cooper

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781473875852

Category: History

Page: 120

View: 974

Few could believe that within twenty years of the war to end all wars being won the world was once again at war. Veterans of the Great War feared going through the same thing again and, even worse, many knew that this time their children would also be involved in the fighting. What had all the sacrifice been about? Cambridgeshire, the city of Cambridge and the University of Cambridge were badly hit by the Great War with many lives lost, families ripped apart and a way of life that had changed forever. Building and economic recovery had been hindered by the Great Depression. The county was not ready to face another war nor for the problems of warfare in the air. Yet somehow the county, the city and the university all found the strength to unite against the enemy once more and ensure that Germany would never win the war. The book chronicles life on the Home Front during the Second World War, which itself reached into every home and affected every citizen, changing the life and the face of the county. It is also a timely reminder of the difficulties, hardships, restrictions and morale faced by the city as the war dragged on, and how the local community overcame the odds that were stacked against them.
Categories: History

Cumbria at War 1939 45

Cumbria at War  1939   45

Vernon Street, Barrow, around three years ago. Newer houses have been built into the far end of the terrace. (Christine Johnstone, geograph.org.uk.) ...

Author: Ruth Mansergh

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473877122

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 169

The outbreak of war marked a new era for the people of Cumbria. Many young men and women enlisted in the Forces, while older people joined the Home Guard or became Air Raid Precaution Wardens. Children from cities were sent to Kendal to escape the threat of bombing raids, members of the Women’s Land Army began to arrive on at the local farms, and Silloth airfield near Carlisle trained thousands of pilots from allied countries.The first sign of German interest in the important shipbuilding town of Barrow-in- Furness was in May 1936, when a rigid airship and passenger aircraft flew very low and slowly over the Furness rooftops. Vickers shipyard became a target for enemy bombing and eventually more than 10,000 houses were damaged or destroyed by the Luftwaffe during the Barrow Blitz that took place during April and May 1941.Extensively researched, the book takes a detailed look at the ships built in Barrow, memorials in the city of Carlisle and towns and villages across Cumbria, and remembers the brave dead of Second World War.Overall, this is a poignant testimony to the momentous efforts, bravery, self-sacrifice and determination of the people of Cumbria during the Second World War, who sought to find normality in a reality so far removed from anything they had ever known.
Categories: History

Capital Ships at War 1939 1945

Capital Ships at War  1939   1945

But this was followed by an attack by seventeen torpedo bombers and one of ... as if they were holiday-makers at Brighton waving at a low-flying aircraft.

Author: John Grehan

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473837355

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 274

Dispatches in this volume include those relating to the sinking of the German battleship Graf Spee in the Battle of the River Plate in 1939, the loss of the battleships HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse in the Far East, the sinking of the German battle cruiser Scharnhorst in 1943, the attack on Tirpitz by midget submarines, the contribution by British Pacific Fleet to the assault on Okinawa in 1945 (which included four Royal Navy battleships), and the sinking of Bismarck in 1941.This unique collection of original documents will prove to be an invaluable resource for historians, students and all those interested in what was one of the most significant periods in British military history.
Categories: History

Stafford at War 1939 1945

Stafford at War 1939 1945

There then followed a period of retraining while the pilots worked on methods of ... He was killed in action later in the war.] Local flying over Brighton.

Author: Nick Thomas

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781844159437

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 538

Stafford at War is a vivid many-sided portrait of a county town during one of the extraordinary periods in English history. In his wide-ranging narrative Nick Thomas looks at the impact of the Second World War on the townspeople - how it affected their daily lives, their work, their families. And he recalls the contribution Stafford made to the war effort at home and abroad. The story he tells gives a fascinating insight into wartime life and it is a moving record of the sacrifices made by local people. His detailed and fully illustrated account will be fascinating reading for everyone who knows Stafford and wants to find out about its history.
Categories: History

Tynemouth and Wallsend at War 1939 45

Tynemouth and Wallsend at War  1939   45

Street, Wallsend.19 Better news was received in the post by Councillor P.M. Laws and his wife at their home in Brighton Grove, Whitley Bay.

Author: Craig Armstrong

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473867567

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 482

Tynemouth and Wallsend were key communities in the national war effort despite their relatively small size. Located on the key East Coast they played a significant military and civil role in the war. Tynemouth was situated at the key entry to the strategically important River Tyne and was well defended against enemy attack with several forts and other measures in place. The scenic seaside town saw a large military buildup with several different army and naval units rotating through the area to man defenses and to train whilst the local Home Guard unit was voted one of the best in the country and was asked to give a radio broadcast on its methods (despite some comic accidents along the way).Wallsend, a largely urban industrial community, was home to key wartime industries with its shipbuilding yards (including Swan Hunters) building and repairing huge numbers of vessels, both naval and merchant, throughout the war. This made the town a significant target for the Luftwaffe and several determined raids were made which inflicted heavy casualties, especially during 1941.The area also hosted a large number of heavy and light industrial works which made significant contributions to the war effort. The fishermen of the North Shields fishing fleet also played a dangerous role during the war (many, including one of the authors grandfathers served in the Royal Naval Reserve) when supplying fresh fish, already a dangerous task, to a near-starving wartime population was made more dangerous through enemy action.The book also looks at the considerable contribution made by the men and women who volunteered for the ARP and Civil Defence Services. The heavy raids resulted in great loss of life, including the most deadly single attack outside of London when over 100 people were killed when a North Shields shelter took a direct hit in 1941, and the men and women of the emergency services were faced with horrifying scenes (the authors other grandfather was a regular fireman and ambulanceman who had a particularly lucky escape when his fire engine was blown into a shell crater during a raid) which they had to overcome and work through.No member of the community was left untouched by the war whether they were evacuees (the authors father was one of them), workers, servicemen or just civilians struggling to maintain a home in wartime Britain.
Categories: History

Be Grateful Brighton College s Fallen 1939 45

Be Grateful  Brighton College s Fallen 1939   45

His announcement of the actual declaration of war-"... and consequently this coun wa- Germany"-was clear and resonant, But there was a catch in his voice ...

Author: David Turner

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781784423650

Category: Education

Page: 184

View: 381

Eighty years on from the beginning of the Second World War it is easy to forget that, for a time, democracy, the rule of law and even everyday values of tolerance and kindness were in danger of being snuffed out in Europe. Given the sacrifices made, we must not forget the people who fought to protect these virtues – particularly those who laid down their lives for this cause. To this end, all Fourth Form pupils at Brighton College have researched an individual Old Brightonian who died in, or as a result of, the war. The list includes former masters, pupils and one German old boy who was doubtless a good man, but fighting for a bad cause. What emerges in this book, a companion to a volume on the fallen of the Great War already published, is a collection of extremely varied personal histories. Where possible, this book recalls the family lives of each man in addition to his war service. The quality of research has been high, and pupils have also excelled at storytelling: finding the excitement and humour in each life, as well as the poignancy. The 170 fallen Old Brightonians of the Second World War, nurtured by the College but cut off in their prime, have been honoured by the current crop of Brightonians, several generations below them.
Categories: Education

Britain at War 1939 to 1945

Britain at War 1939 to 1945

Imagine strolling along the Brighton promenade in the sunshine when, without warning, a German fighter returning to France dives out of the blue and empties ...

Author: James Lingard

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781504942133

Category: Education

Page: 150

View: 818

The book has excellent reviews from UCL People (University College London) and the Historical Association, a British charity for teachers. It gives a short insight into the horrors of the home front told from the perspective of someone who actually experienced them, a fascinating look at the harsh realities of life in Britain, life full of drama and the danger of impending death. How did a family with a small child caught up in such a war survive? There follows an overview of the major campaigns in World War II, giving an insight into the big picture, enlivened by personal experiences and quotations from Churchill. A Canadian reviewer has said, This book was a relatively quick read that would be of interest to those who might not have much background in the events of the war or those who know the broad details but want the day to day understanding of how lives were affected by things like bombing raids. James Lingard has meticulously researched and presented the timeline of events for the war, but where this book really shines as far as I am concerned is in the sharing of his own familys experiences as they were personally impacted. Though only a young boy when the war began, his life was affected in multiple ways and his family was at one point thought killed as their air raid shelter was destroyed. In actual fact they had gone out to the woods for an outing, which ultimately saved their lives! Another enjoyable part of the book was the quotes Lingard used at the beginning of each chapter. Many of these quotes were taken from speeches by Churchill or other prominent men of the time and they add to the general picture and emotions of the period.
Categories: Education

Frome at War 1939 45

Frome at War 1939   45

Meanwhile, the return to France now had a date. ... its preparations for the move to its new location: the south-east coast between Brighton and Bognor.

Author: David Lassman

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526706027

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 141

Frome at War 1939-1945 is a comprehensive account of this Somerset market town’s experience of the conflict, covering in detail life on the Home Front set against the background of the wider theatres of war. The narrative of that global struggle is given with a focus on the ordeals endured by the people of Frome, as they cheered their men and women fighters off to war, welcomed hundreds of evacuated men, women and children to the town, and contributed their part to the fight against Hitler and the Nazi threat. Rare insights into the life of the town are included, along with seldom told stories from the footnotes of history; from Frome’s part within the secret underground resistance movement and the national fight for women’s equality, to the gradual influx of American GIs and Field-Marshall Montgomery's stay in the aftermath of Dunkirk. The book incorporates memoirs and memories, along with in depth research from official records and newspaper accounts, which allow the reader to see the war not only from ordinary people’s perceptive, but the military experiences of Frome’s heroic men and women - and in many cases their tragic sacrifices – as well. More controversial aspects are also touched on, including injustice, espionage, racism and politics, to give a full and fascinating picture of a town facing profound trials of endurance and courage, but at the same time revealing the characteristics that have sustained Frome throughout its illustrious and turbulent history.
Categories: History

Devon at War 1939 45

Devon at War  1939   45

Over 300,000 troops were saved and returned to England. ... the Brighton Belle, which rescued 800 troops, and the Devonia, which had to be abandoned at ...

Author: Derek Tait

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781473855762

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 975

When war was declared on 1 September 1939, the people of Devon pulled together in a way that they hadn't done since the Great War of 1914–18. This book covers the people of Devon's contribution to the war effort, from the commencement of the conflict in September 1939, to its end in September 1945. It features many forgotten news stories of the day and looks at the changes to civilian's everyday lives, entertainment, spies and the internment of aliens living within the area.Devon became vital as a base for troops and as a dispatch point for the many men who left to fight in Europe. Several RAF bases were also established within the county to repel German attacks. Air raid shelters were erected in gardens and at public places and many children living in larger cities were swiftly evacuated to the countryside, as Plymouth and Exeter both suffered greatly from German bombing, with much of Plymouth being obliterated. Carrying a gas mask, rationing, the make-do-and-mend culture and the collection of scrap metal all became a generic way of life.Many of the jobs left open by men fighting abroad were taken up by women on the Home Front. The Women's Voluntary Service assisted with the evacuation of mothers and children to the country, carried out civil defense duties and provided food and clothing for the many refugees from occupied Europe.During the buildup to D Day, American troops were trained and stationed within the county before leaving for the beaches of Normandy. Slapton Sands, Dartmoor and Woolacombe were all used as training grounds with tragic loss of life at Slapton.Devon played a truly vital role in the war and its people contributed greatly to bringing the world changing conflict to an end.
Categories: History

The Test of War

The Test of War

Among you taking notes: the wartime diary of Naomi Mitchison 19391945 (Oxford: ... to the Beveridge Report (Brighton: University of Sussex Library, 1988).

Author: Robert Mackay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135362133

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 747

While it lasted, the Second World War dominated the life of the nations that were involved and most of those that were not. Since Britain was in at both the start and the finish her people experienced the impact of total ar in full measure. The experience was a test of the most comprehensive kind: of the institutions, of the resources, and the very cohesion of the nation. The Test of War by Robert Mackay examines how the nation responded to this test. For a generation after the ending of the war this response was represented as largely unproblematical: faced with mortal threat to their survival the people rallied around their leaders, sank their differences and bore the burdens and sacrifices that were necessary to victory. More recently, demurring voices have challeged this cosy picture by emphasizing negative features of the war as official muddle, low industrial productivity and strikes, the black market, looting and the persistence of hostile class relations. Robert Mackay re-examines these debates, arguing that, for all its imperfections, British society under threat remained vital, cohesive and optimistically creative about its future.
Categories: History

Submarines at War 1939 45

Submarines at War 1939 45

Acknowledgements I have so many people to thank for help of one kind or another that the following list is bound to be incomplete ; I sincerely apologise if ...

Author: Richard Compton-Hall

Publisher: Periscope Publishing Ltd.

ISBN: 1904381227

Category:

Page: 160

View: 813

This volume provides Compton Hall's pictorial history of submarine warfare in World War II.
Categories:

The Crucible of War 1939 1945

The Crucible of War  1939 1945

Department of National Defence, Canada. ... Dover Lympne 401 San Dungeness Nieuport BELGIUM o Calais Portsmouth Merston 412 San Strait of Dover o Brighton o ...

Author: Brereton Greenhous

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802005748

Category: History

Page: 1096

View: 415

The RCAF, with a total strength of 4061 officers and men on 1 September 1939, grew by the end of the war to a strength of more than 263,000 men and women. This important and well-illustrated new history shows how they contributed to the resolution of the most significant conflict of our time.
Categories: History

The World at War 1939 45

The World at War  1939 45

It was during a brief lull in the battle , due to bad weather ... Roedean , for instance , moved from Brighton to Keswick , where the girls were ...

Author: Edgar Holt

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89003713898

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 272

View: 688

Categories: World War, 1939-1945

The World at War 1939 1944

The World at War  1939 1944

A Brief History of World War II; Materials for the Use of Army ... were directed at the coastal ports and airdromes from south of Brighton to Portland .

Author: United States. War Department. General Staff

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:30000005086974

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 416

View: 101

Categories: World War, 1939-1945