Bloomer Girls

Women Baseball Pioneers

Author: Debra A Shattuck

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209879X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 328

View: 9800

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Disapproving scolds. Sexist condescension. Odd theories about the effect of exercise on reproductive organs. Though baseball began as a gender-neutral sport, girls and women of the nineteenth century faced many obstacles on their way to the diamond. Yet all-female nines took the field everywhere. Debra A. Shattuck pulls from newspaper accounts and hard-to-find club archives to reconstruct a forgotten era in baseball history. Her fascinating social history tracks women players who organized baseball clubs for their own enjoyment and found roster spots on men's teams. Entrepreneurs, meanwhile, packaged women's teams as entertainment, organizing leagues and barnstorming tours. If the women faced financial exploitation and indignities like playing against men in women's clothing, they and countless ballplayers like them nonetheless staked a claim to the nascent national pastime. Shattuck explores how the determination to take their turn at bat thrust female players into narratives of the women's rights movement and transformed perceptions of women's physical and mental capacity.
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Muscle on Wheels

Louise Armaindo and the High-Wheel Racers of Nineteenth-Century America

Author: M. Ann Hall

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773555331

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 5525

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The majestic high-wheel bicycle, with its spider wheels and rubber tires, emerged in the mid-1870s as the standard bicycle. A common misconception is that, bound by Victorian dress and decorum, women were unable to ride it, only taking up cycling in the 1880s with the advent of the chain-driven safety bicycle. On the contrary, women had been riding and even racing some form of the bicycle since the first vélocipèdes appeared in Europe early in the nineteenth century. Challenging the understanding that bicycling was a purely masculine sport, Muscle on Wheels tells the story of women's high-wheel racing in North America in the 1880s and early 1890s, with a focus on a particular cyclist: Louise Armaindo (1857–1900). Among Canada's first women professional athletes and the first woman who was truly successful as a high-wheel racer, Armaindo began her career as a strongwoman and trapeze artist in Chicago in the 1870s before discovering high-wheel bicycle racing. Initially she competed against men, but as more women took up the sport, she raced them too. Although Armaindo is the star of Muscle on Wheels, the book is also about other women cyclists and the many men – racers, managers, trainers, agents, bookmakers, sport administrators, and editors of influential cycling magazines – who controlled the sport, especially in the United States. The story of working-class Victorian women who earned a living through their athletic talent, Muscle on Wheels showcases an exciting moment in women's and athletic history that is often forgotten or misconstrued.
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The Prophetic Dimension of Sport

Author: Terry Shoemaker

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3030022935

Category: Social Science

Page: 57

View: 9895

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Bringing together leading scholars in the fields of Religion and Sport, this book examines the prophetic dimension of sport, to arrive at a better understanding of the nature of sports in the United States. By detailing and analyzing particular sports, a portrait of sport as an important space for social and political critique emerges. Sport is indisputably an important cultural phenomenon in the United States. Each year millions attend sporting events, track the statistics and lives of sports stars, collect memorabilia, engage in fantasy sports, and play various sporting games. But increasingly, sport is also a space for public articulations regarding social and political issues within the United States. What are we to make of these particular articulations? What do they tell us about the nature of sport in the United States? How are these social and political critiques formed? Why do sporting voices seem to carry more weight at this moment in history? Ideally suited for use in undergraduate and graduate courses, this book offers a new way of thinking about the connection between sport and religion in a secularizing society. By analyzing various sports and particular historical moments, the chapters supply a unique example of the relevance of sport as it pertains to social and political critique.
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American Sports

Author: Pamela Grundy,Benjamin G Rader

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315509237

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5917

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American Sports offers a reflective, analytical history of American sports from the colonial era to the present. Readers will focus on the diverse relationships between sports and class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion and region, and understand how these interactions can bind diverse groups together. By considering the economic, social and cultural factors that have surrounded competitive sports, readers will understand how sports have reinforced or challenged the values and behaviors of society.
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Baseball: The people's game

Author: Harold Seymour

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 672

View: 4303

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Dr. Harold Seymour has pioneered the scholarly study of baseball. Hailed by Sports Illustrated as the "Edward Gibbon of baseball history," he is the first professional historian to produce an authoritative, multivolume chronicle of America's national pastime. The first two volumes of this study--The Early Years and The Golden Age--won universal acclaim. The New York Times wrote that they "will grip every American who has invested part of his youth and dreams in the sport," while The Boston Globe called them "irresistible." Now, in The People's Game, the third volume of Baseball, Dr. Seymour offers the first book devoted entirely to the history of the game outside of the professional leagues, revealing how, from its early beginnings up to World War II, baseball truly became the great American pastime. He looks at the bond between baseball and boys through the decades, the game's place in institutions from colleges to prisons to the armed forces, the rise of women's baseball with nineteenth century feminism, and the struggles of black players and clubs from the later years of slavery up to the Second World War. The national sport pops up in the most unexpected places, from the cavalrymen's game at Fort Apache called off because of Geronimo's escape, to the scene of Philippine head-hunters enthusiastically playing ball, to General MacArthur as player/manager of the Fort Leavenworth team bringing in professional ringers. And the contests Dr. Seymour describes are as vivid and exciting as yesterday's game. Whether discussing the birth of softball or the origins of the seventh inning stretch, Dr. Seymour enriches his wide research with fascinating details and entertaining anecdotes as well as his own wealth of baseball experience. The People's Game brings to life the central role of baseball for generations of Americans.
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Baseball History

Author: Peter Levine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780887363429

Category: Baseball

Page: N.A

View: 667

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Presents a series of articles, reviews, and interviews relating to the history of baseball
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Breaking into baseball

women and the national pastime

Author: Jean Hastings Ardell

Publisher: Southern Illinois University

ISBN: 9780809326266

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 278

View: 612

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While baseball is traditionally perceived as a game to be played, enjoyed, and reported from a masculine perspective, it has long been beloved among women—more so than any other spectator sport. Breaking into Baseball: Women and the National Pastime upends baseball’s accepted history to at last reveal just how involved women are, and have always been, in the American game. Through provocative interviews and deft research, Jean Hastings Ardell devotes a detailed chapter to each of the seven ways women participate in the game—from the stands as fans, on the field as professionals or as amateur players, behind the plate as umpires, in the front office as executives, in the press box as sportswriters and reporters, or in the shadows as Baseball Annies. From these revelatory vantage points, Ardell invites overdue appreciation for the affinity and talent women bring to baseball at all levels and shows us our national game anew. From its ancient origins in spring fertility rituals through contemporary marketing efforts geared toward an ever-increasing female fan base, baseball has always had a feminine side, and generations of women have sought—and been sought after—to participate in the sport, even when doing so meant challenging the cultural mores of their era. In that regard, women have been breaking into baseball from the very beginning. But recent decades have witnessed great strides in legitimizing women’s roles on the diamond as players and umpires as well as in vital management and media roles. In her thoughtfully organized and engagingly written survey, Ardell offers a chance for sports enthusiasts and historians of both genders to better appreciate the storied and complex relationship women have so long shared with the game and to glimpse the future of women in baseball. Breaking into Baseball is augmented by twenty-four illustrations and a foreword from Ila Borders, the first woman to play more than three seasons of men’s professional baseball.
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