Black Reconstruction in America

Toward a History of the Part Which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America, 1860-1880

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351376616

Category: History

Page: 684

View: 4016

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After four centuries of bondage, the nineteenth century marked the long-awaited release of millions of black slaves. Subsequently, these former slaves attempted to reconstruct the basis of American democracy. W. E. B. Du Bois, one of the greatest intellectual leaders in United States history, evaluates the twenty years of fateful history that followed the Civil War, with special reference to the efforts and experiences of African Americans. Du Bois's words best indicate the broader parameters of his work: "the attitude of any person toward this book will be distinctly influenced by his theories of the Negro race. If he believes that the Negro in America and in general is an average and ordinary human being, who under given environment develops like other human beings, then he will read this story and judge it by the facts adduced." The plight of the white working class throughout the world is directly traceable to American slavery, on which modern commerce and industry was founded, Du Bois argues. Moreover, the resulting color caste was adopted, forwarded, and approved by white labor, and resulted in the subordination of colored labor throughout the world. As a result, the majority of the world's laborers became part of a system of industry that destroyed democracy and led to World War I and the Great Depression. This book tells that story.
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Black Reconstruction in America (The Oxford W. E. B. Du Bois)

An Essay Toward a History of the Part Which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America, 1860-1880

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019938567X

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 9160

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W. E. B. Du Bois was a public intellectual, sociologist, and activist on behalf of the African American community. He profoundly shaped black political culture in the United States through his founding role in the NAACP, as well as internationally through the Pan-African movement. Du Bois's sociological and historical research on African-American communities and culture broke ground in many areas, including the history of the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. Du Bois was also a prolific author of novels, autobiographical accounts, innumerable editorials and journalistic pieces, and several works of history. Black Reconstruction in America tells and interprets the story of the twenty years of Reconstruction from the point of view of newly liberated African Americans. Though lambasted by critics at the time of its publication in 1935, Black Reconstruction has only grown in historical and literary importance. In the 1960s it joined the canon of the most influential revisionist historical works. Its greatest achievement is weaving a credible, lyrical historical narrative of the hostile and politically fraught years of 1860-1880 with a powerful critical analysis of the harmful effects of democracy, including Jim Crow laws and other injustices. With a series introduction by editor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and an introduction by David Levering Lewis, this edition is essential for anyone interested in African American history.
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Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois,David Levering Lewis

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684856573

Category: History

Page: 746

View: 5692

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The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time. The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time.
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From Cotton Field to Schoolhouse

African American Education in Mississippi, 1862-1875

Author: Christopher M. Span

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469601338

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3338

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In the years immediately following the Civil War--the formative years for an emerging society of freed African Americans in Mississippi--there was much debate over the general purpose of black schools and who would control them. From Cotton Field to Schoolhouse is the first comprehensive examination of Mississippi's politics and policies of postwar racial education. The primary debate centered on whether schools for African Americans (mostly freedpeople) should seek to develop blacks as citizens, train them to be free but subordinate laborers, or produce some other outcome. African Americans envisioned schools established by and for themselves as a primary means of achieving independence, equality, political empowerment, and some degree of social and economic mobility--in essence, full citizenship. Most northerners assisting freedpeople regarded such expectations as unrealistic and expected African Americans to labor under contract for those who had previously enslaved them and their families. Meanwhile, many white Mississippians objected to any educational opportunities for the former slaves. Christopher Span finds that newly freed slaves made heroic efforts to participate in their own education, but too often the schooling was used to control and redirect the aspirations of the newly freed.
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Racist America

Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations

Author: Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134487363

Category: Social Science

Page: 373

View: 2689

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This third edition of Joe R. Feagin’s Racist America is significantly revised and updated, with an eye toward racism issues arising regularly in our contemporary era. This edition incorporates more than two hundred recent research studies and reports on U.S. racial issues that update and enhance all the last edition’s chapters. It expands the discussion and data on concepts such as the white racial frame and systemic racism from research studies by Feagin and his colleagues. The author has further polished the book to make it yet more readable for undergraduates, including eliminating repetitive materials, adding headings and more cross-referencing, and adding new examples, anecdotes, and narratives about contemporary racism.
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Hearing the Hurt

Rhetoric, Aesthetics, and Politics of the New Negro Movement

Author: Eric King Watts

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 081731766X

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 2199

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Examines how the Harlem Renaissance brought black culture to the fore in American language during the early 20th century, exploring especially how the meaning of the word "black" changed due to culture shifts.
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The Challenge of American History

Author: Louis P. Masur

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801862229

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 341

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In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.
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The End of Labour History?

Author: Marcel van der Linden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521467230

Category: History

Page: 173

View: 6528

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The essays in this 1994 book aim to integrate labour history within the broader discipline of social history and to demonstrate the continuing vitality and validity of the sub-discipline. Each essay is in itself a response to criticisms of the ways in which labour historians have approached their subjects.
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