Birthright Citizens

A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

Author: Martha S. Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107150345

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 427

Explains the origins of the Fourteenth Amendment's birthright citizenship provision, as a story of black Americans' pre-Civil War claims to belonging.
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Birthright Citizenship Under the 14th Amendment of Persons Born in the United States to Alien Parents

Author: Margaret Mikyung Lee

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 1437939198

Category:

Page: 18

View: 8618

This is a print on demand edition of a hard to find publication. Over the last decade or so, concern about illegal immigration has sporadically led to a re-examination of a long-established tenet of U.S. citizenship, codified in the Citizenship Clause of the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), that a person who is born in the U.S., is a citizen of the U.S. regardless of the race, ethnicity, or alienage of the parents. Some congressional Members have supported a revision of the Citizenship Clause or at least holding hearings for a serious consideration of it. Contents of this report: (1) Intro.; (2) Historical Development: Jus Soli Doctrine Before the 14th Amend.; The 14th Amend. and the Civil Rights Act of 1866; U.S. v. Wong Kim Ark and Elk v. Wilkins; (3) Legislative Proposals.
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Anchor Babies and the Challenge of Birthright Citizenship

Author: Leo R. Chavez

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503605264

Category: Political Science

Page: 120

View: 3358

Birthright citizenship has a deep and contentious history in the United States, one often hard to square in a country that prides itself on being "a nation of immigrants." Even as the question of citizenship for children of immigrants was seemingly settled by the Fourteenth Amendment, vitriolic debate has continued for well over a century, especially in relation to U.S. race relations. Most recently, a provocative and decidedly more offensive term than birthright citizenship has emerged: "anchor babies." With this book, Leo R. Chavez explores the question of birthright citizenship, and of citizenship in the United States writ broadly, as he counters the often hyperbolic claims surrounding these so-called anchor babies. Chavez considers how the term is used as a political dog whistle, how changes in the legal definition of citizenship have affected the children of immigrants over time, and, ultimately, how U.S.-born citizens still experience trauma if they live in families with undocumented immigrants. By examining this pejorative term in its political, historical, and social contexts, Chavez calls upon us to exorcise it from public discourse and work toward building a more inclusive nation.
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The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship

Author: Ayelet Shachar,Rainer Bauböck

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198805853

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 6163

Contrary to predictions that it would become increasingly redundant in a globalizing world, citizenship is back with a vengeance. The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship brings together leading experts in law, philosophy, political science, economics, sociology, and geography to provide a multidisciplinary, comparative discussion of different dimensions of citizenship: as legal status and political membership; as rights and obligations; as identity and belonging; as civic virtues and practices of engagement; and as a discourse of political and social equality or responsibility for a common good. The contributors engage with some of the oldest normative and substantive quandaries in the literature, dilemmas that have renewed salience in today's political climate. As well as setting an agenda for future theoretical and empirical explorations, this Handbook explores the state of citizenship today in an accessible and engaging manner that will appeal to a wide academic and non-academic audience. Chapters highlight variations in citizenship regimes practiced in different countries, from immigrant states to 'non-western' contexts, from settler societies to newly independent states, attentive to both migrants and those who never cross an international border. Topics include the 'selling' of citizenship, multilevel citizenship, in-between statuses, citizenship laws, post-colonial citizenship, the impact of technological change on citizenship, and other cutting-edge issues. This Handbook is the major reference work for those engaged with citizenship from a legal, political, and cultural perspective. Written by the most knowledgeable senior and emerging scholars in their fields, this comprehensive volume offers state-of-the-art analyses of the main challenges and prospects of citizenship in today's world of increased migration and globalization. Special emphasis is put on the question of whether inclusive and egalitarian citizenship can provide political legitimacy in a turbulent world of exploding social inequality and resurgent populism.
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The Contested Politics of Mobility

Borderzones and Irregularity

Author: Vicki Squire

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136887334

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2059

The Contested Politics of Mobility is the first collection to explore how the politics of mobility turns on the condition of irregularity. Timely and incisive, it brings together leading scholars from across the sub-disciplines of citizenship, migration and security studies, who show irregularity to be a produced and highly contested socio-political condition.
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Nationality, Citizenship and Ethno-Cultural Belonging

Preferential Membership Policies in Europe

Author: C. Dumbrava

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137382082

Category: Political Science

Page: 196

View: 8793

This book challenges mainstream arguments about the de-ethnicization of citizenship in Europe, offering a critical discussion of normative justifications for ethno-cultural citizenship and an original elaboration of principles of membership suitable for contemporary liberal democratic states.
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The Founders on Citizenship and Immigration

Principles and Challenges in America

Author: Edward J. Erler,Thomas G. West,John A. Marini

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742558557

Category: History

Page: 171

View: 9268

Working with the underlying premise that America's founding principles continue to be vital in the modern era, Erler, Marini, and West take a conservative look at immigration, one of today's most pressing political issues. Character_the capacity to live a life befitting republican citizens_is, as the Founders knew, crucial to the debate about immigration. The Founders on Citizenship and Immigration seeks to revive the issue of republican character in the current immigration debate and to elucidate the constitutional foundations of American citizenship. Published in cooperation with the Claremont Institute.
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The Ethics of Immigration

Author: Joseph Carens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199933839

Category: Philosophy

Page: 364

View: 8161

Eminent political theorist Joseph Carens tests the limits of democratic theory in the realm of immigration, arguing that any acceptable immigration policy must be based on moral principles even if it conflicts with the will of the majority.
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Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

Author: J. Rohrer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137488204

Category: Political Science

Page: 85

View: 5648

The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.
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