Beyond Weird

Beyond Weird

No one can say what quantam mechanics means (and this is a book about it) -- Quantum mechanics is not really about the quantum -- Quantum objects are neither wave nor particle (but sometimes they might as well be) -- Quantum particles aren ...

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780226558387

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 165

No one can say what quantam mechanics means (and this is a book about it) -- Quantum mechanics is not really about the quantum -- Quantum objects are neither wave nor particle (but sometimes they might as well be) -- Quantum particles aren't in two states at once (but sometimes they might as well be) -- What "happens" depends on what we find out about it -- There are many ways of interpreting quantum theory (and none of them quite make sense) -- Whatever the question, the answer is "yes" (unless it's "no") -- Not everything is knowable at once -- The properties of quantum objects don't have to be contained within the objects -- There is no "spooky action at a distance"--The everyday world is what quantum becomes at human scales -- Everything you experience is a (partial) copy of what causes it -- Schrödinger's cat has had kittens -- Quantum mechanics can be harnessed for technology -- Quantum computers don't necessarily perform "many calculations at once" -- There is no other "quantum" you -- Things could be even more "quantum" than they are (so why aren't they)? -- The fundamental laws of quantum mechanics might be simpler than we imagine -- Can we ever get to the bottom of it?
Categories: Science

Beyond Weird

Beyond Weird

Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different Philip Ball. “ BALL IS ONE OF THE FINEST CONTEMPORARY WRITERS ABOUT SCIENCE . " WALL STREET JOURNAL BEYOND WEIRD WHY EVERYTHING YOU THOUGHT YOU KNEW ABOUT QUANTUM ...

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226755106

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 233

“Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it.” Since Niels Bohr said this many years ago, quantum mechanics has only been getting more shocking. We now realize that it’s not really telling us that “weird” things happen out of sight, on the tiniest level, in the atomic world: rather, everything is quantum. But if quantum mechanics is correct, what seems obvious and right in our everyday world is built on foundations that don’t seem obvious or right at all—or even possible. An exhilarating tour of the contemporary quantum landscape, Beyond Weird is a book about what quantum physics really means—and what it doesn’t. Science writer Philip Ball offers an up-to-date, accessible account of the quest to come to grips with the most fundamental theory of physical reality, and to explain how its counterintuitive principles underpin the world we experience. Over the past decade it has become clear that quantum physics is less a theory about particles and waves, uncertainty and fuzziness, than a theory about information and knowledge—about what can be known, and how we can know it. Discoveries and experiments over the past few decades have called into question the meanings and limits of space and time, cause and effect, and, ultimately, of knowledge itself. The quantum world Ball shows us isn’t a different world. It is our world, and if anything deserves to be called “weird,” it’s us.
Categories: Science

The Oxford Handbook of Humanism

The Oxford Handbook of Humanism

Philip Ball, Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different 31. 32. 33. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018). Pinn, When Colorblindness Isn't the Answer. David Cave, Mircea Eliade's Vision ...

Author: Anthony B. Pinn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190921569

Category: Religion

Page: 900

View: 665

While humanist sensibilities have played a formative role in the advancement of our species, critical attention to humanism as a field of study is a more recent development. As a system of thought that values human needs and experiences over supernatural concerns, humanism has gained greater attention amid the rapidly shifting demographics of religious communities, especially in Europe and North America. This outlook on the world has taken on global dimensions as well, with activists, artists, and thinkers forming a humanistic response not only to traditional religion, but to the pressing social and political issues of the 21st century. With in-depth, scholarly chapters, The Oxford Handbook of Humanism aims to cover the subject by analyzing its history, its philosophical development, its influence on culture, and its engagement with social and political issues. In order to expand the field beyond more Western-focused works, the Handook discusses humanism as a worldwide phenomenon, with regional surveys that explore how the concept has developed in particular contexts. The Handbook also approaches humanism as both an opponent to traditional religion as well as a philosophy that some religions have explicitly adopted. By both synthesizing the field, and discussing how it continues to grow and develop, the Handbook promises to be a landmark volume, relevant to both humanism and the rapidly changing religious landscape.
Categories: Religion

When the Uncertainty Principle Goes to 11

When the Uncertainty Principle Goes to 11

You might even find you have a better grip of the notorious mind-warping concepts of quantum mechanics too.” —PHILIP BALL, author of Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different “A magical mosh ...

Author: Philip Moriarty

Publisher: BenBella Books

ISBN: 9781944648534

Category: Music

Page: 303

View: 360

There are deep and fascinating links between heavy metal and quantum physics. No, really! While teaching at the University of Nottingham, physicist Philip Moriarty noticed something odd, a surprising number of his students were heavily into metal music. Colleagues, too: a Venn diagram of physicists and metal fans would show a shocking amount of overlap. What's more, it turns out that heavy metal music is uniquely well-suited to explaining quantum principles. In When the Uncertainty Principle Goes to Eleven, Moriarty explains the mysteries of the universe's inner workings via drum beats and feedback: You'll discover how the Heisenberg uncertainty principle comes into play with every chugging guitar riff, what wave interference has to do with Iron Maiden, and why metalheads in mosh pits behave just like molecules in a gas. If you're a metal fan trying to grasp the complexities of quantum physics, a quantum physicist baffled by heavy metal, or just someone who'd like to know how the fundamental science underpinning our world connects to rock music, this book will take you, in the words of Pantera, to "A New Level." For those who think quantum physics is too mind-bendingly complex to grasp, or too focused on the invisibly small to be relevant to our full-sized lives, this funny, fascinating book will show you that physics is all around us . . . and it rocks.
Categories: Music

Math Games with Bad Drawings

Math Games with Bad Drawings

75 1/4 Simple, Challenging, Go-Anywhere Games—And Why They Matter Ben Orlin ... 2010), and Philip Ball, Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2020).

Author: Ben Orlin

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780762499854

Category: Mathematics

Page: 320

View: 583

Bestselling author and worst-drawing artist Ben Orlin expands his oeuvre with this interactive collection of mathematical games. With 70-plus games, each taking a minute to learn and a lifetime to master, this treasure trove will delight, educate, and entertain. From beloved math popularizer Ben Orlin comes a masterfully compiled collection of dozens of playable mathematical games.This ultimate game chest draws on mathematical curios, childhood classics, and soon-to-be classics, each hand-chosen to be (1) fun, (2) thought-provoking, and (3) easy to play. With just paper, pens, and the occasional handful of coins, you and a partner can enjoy hours of fun—and hours of challenge. Orlin’s sly humor, expansive knowledge, and so-bad-they’re-good drawings show us how simple rules summon our best thinking. Games include: Ultimate Tic-Tac-Toe Sprouts Battleship Quantum Go Fish Dots and Boxes Black Hole Order and Chaos Sequencium Paper Boxing Prophecies Arpeggios Banker Francoprussian Labyrinth Cats and Dogs And many more.
Categories: Mathematics

Existential Physics

Existential Physics

107 I agree with Philip Ball: Philip Ball, Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018). 109 “spooky action at a distance”: Albert Einstein, ...

Author: Sabine Hossenfelder

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 9781838950378

Category: Science

Page:

View: 495

Do we have free will? Is the universe compatible with God? Do we live in a computer simulation? Does the universe think? Physicists are great at complicated research, but they are less good at telling us why it matters. In this entertaining and groundbreaking book, theoretical physicist Sabine Hossenfelder breaks down why we should care. Drawing on the latest research in quantum mechanics, black holes, string theory and particle physics, Existential Physics explains what modern physics can tell us about the big questions. Filled with counterintuitive insights and including interviews with other leading scientists, this clear and yet profound book will reshape your understanding of science and the limits of what we can know.
Categories: Science

Quantum Entanglement

Quantum Entanglement

Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Becker, Adam. 2018. What Is Real? The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics.

Author: Jed Brody

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262357623

Category: Science

Page: 184

View: 117

An exploration of quantum entanglement and the ways in which it contradicts our everyday assumptions about the ultimate nature of reality. Quantum physics is notable for its brazen defiance of common sense. (Think of Schrödinger's Cat, famously both dead and alive.) An especially rigorous form of quantum contradiction occurs in experiments with entangled particles. Our common assumption is that objects have properties whether or not anyone is observing them, and the measurement of one can't affect the other. Quantum entanglement—called by Einstein “spooky action at a distance”—rejects this assumption, offering impeccable reasoning and irrefutable evidence of the opposite. Is quantum entanglement mystical, or just mystifying? In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, Jed Brody equips readers to decide for themselves. He explains how our commonsense assumptions impose constraints—from which entangled particles break free. Brody explores such concepts as local realism, Bell's inequality, polarization, time dilation, and special relativity. He introduces readers to imaginary physicists Alice and Bob and their photon analyses; points out that it's easier to reject falsehood than establish the truth; and reports that some physicists explain entanglement by arguing that we live in a cross-section of a higher-dimensional reality. He examines a variety of viewpoints held by physicists, including quantum decoherence, Niels Bohr's Copenhagen interpretation, genuine fortuitousness, and QBism. This relatively recent interpretation, an abbreviation of “quantum Bayesianism,” holds that there's no such thing as an absolutely accurate, objective probability “out there,” that quantum mechanical probabilities are subjective judgments, and there's no “action at a distance,” spooky or otherwise.
Categories: Science

Uncountable

Uncountable

... of quantum physics, Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew about Quantum Physics Is Different (Chicago: ... We say “as if” in order to avoid taking any position on the reasons for or ontological meaning of these results.

Author: David Nirenberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226647036

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 957

Ranging from math to literature to philosophy, Uncountable explains how numbers triumphed as the basis of knowledge—and compromise our sense of humanity. Our knowledge of mathematics has structured much of what we think we know about ourselves as individuals and communities, shaping our psychologies, sociologies, and economies. In pursuit of a more predictable and more controllable cosmos, we have extended mathematical insights and methods to more and more aspects of the world. Today those powers are greater than ever, as computation is applied to virtually every aspect of human activity. Yet, in the process, are we losing sight of the human? When we apply mathematics so broadly, what do we gain and what do we lose, and at what risk to humanity? These are the questions that David and Ricardo L. Nirenberg ask in Uncountable, a provocative account of how numerical relations became the cornerstone of human claims to knowledge, truth, and certainty. There is a limit to these number-based claims, they argue, which they set out to explore. The Nirenbergs, father and son, bring together their backgrounds in math, history, literature, religion, and philosophy, interweaving scientific experiments with readings of poems, setting crises in mathematics alongside world wars, and putting medieval Muslim and Buddhist philosophers in conversation with Einstein, Schrödinger, and other giants of modern physics. The result is a powerful lesson in what counts as knowledge and its deepest implications for how we live our lives.
Categories: History

The Great Paradox of Science

The Great Paradox of Science

... Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics is Different. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Ballentine, L. E. 1970. “The Statistical Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.” Reviews of Modern Physics 42, no.

Author: Mano Singham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190055066

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 545

Science has revolutionized our lives and continues to show inexorable progress today. It may seem obvious that this must be because its theories are steadily getting better and approaching the truth about the world. After all, what could science be progressing toward, if not the truth? But scholarship in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science offers little support for such a sanguine view. Those opposed to specific conclusions of the scientific community-nonbelievers in vaccinations, climate change, and evolution, for example-have been able to use a superficial understanding of the nature of science to sow doubt about the scientific consensus in those areas, leaving the general public confused as to whom to trust, with damaging effects for the health of individuals and the planet. The Great Paradox of Science argues that to better counter such anti-science efforts requires us to understand the nature of scientific knowledge at a much deeper level and dispel many myths and misconceptions. It is the use of scientific logic, the characteristics of which are elaborated on in the book, that enables the scientific community to arrive at reliable consensus judgments in which the public can retain a high degree of confidence. This scientific logic is applicable not just in science but can be used in all areas of life. Scientists, policymakers, and members of the general public will not only better understand why science works: They will also acquire the tools they need to make sound, rational decisions in all areas of their lives.
Categories: Science

Thinking About It

Thinking About It

Six Big Questions about Evolution Baggott, Jim: Farewell to Reality: How Modern Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth Ball, Philip: Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics is Different ...

Author: Steven H. Propp

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781663215710

Category: Religion

Page: 300

View: 548

Steve Propp most often writes novels, with serious intellectual themes. But this nonfiction book contains writings and essays dealing with a wide variety of topics in the areas of science, religion, philosophy, and politics. The first section includes expansions of topics that were briefly covered in his earlier nonfiction book, Inquiries: Philosophical (2002). Subjects include: Science and the Multiverse; Time Travel; Extraterrestrial Life; Artificial Intelligence; Life after Death, and more. The second section consists of twelve “Lay Sermons,” such as could be addressed to a religious congregation, on topics such as: the Image of God; the Problem of Suffering; Social Justice; Forgiveness; hurtful “divisions” based on gender, sexual orientation, etc.; “Negative” images in the mass media, and others. The third section contains thirty brief topical essays, such as: Family; Education; Loneliness; Freedom; Authority; Justice; Progress; Individuality; Civility; Technology; Emotions; and even Holidays. The final section has several previously unpublished writings.
Categories: Religion