The Fellowship of the Beatific Vision

The Fellowship of the Beatific Vision

Their shared commitment to the beatific vision nonetheless leads Dante and Chaucer to produce different sorts of poetry, the one severe, elevated, and carefully organized, the other messier, earthier, funnier. To hold these two writers ...

Author: Norm Klassen

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498283694

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 828

In The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer asks a basic human question: How do we overcome tyranny? His answer goes to the heart of a revolutionary way of thinking about the very end of human existence and the nature of created being. His answer, declared performatively over the course of a symbolic pilgrimage, urges the view that humanity has an intrinsic need of grace in order to be itself. In portraying this outlook, Chaucer contributes to what has been called the "palaeo-Christian" understanding of creaturely freedom. Paradoxically, genuine freedom grows out of the dependency of all things upon God. In imaginatively inhabiting this view of reality, Chaucer aligns himself with that other great poet-theologian of the Middle Ages, Dante. Both are true Christian humanists. They recognize in art a fragile opportunity: not to reduce reality to a set of dogmatic propositions but to participate in an ever-deepening mystery. Chaucer effectively calls all would-be members of the pilgrim fellowship that is the church to behave as artists, interpretively responding to God in the finitude of their existence together.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Beatific Vision Seeing GOD Face to Face

The Beatific Vision Seeing GOD Face to Face

If you are on a sadhana (discipline) and are having dreams and visions of God nightly - leave it alone. It can hurt your state. If you are in an intermediate state, watch it for information, inspiration and even entertainment.

Author: Rasa Von Werder

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780557134038

Category:

Page: 122

View: 399

GOD SAID TO MOSES, YOU CANNOT SEE ME & LIVE- BUT GURU RASA VON WERDER SAW GOD & LIVED, AS GOD'S MEANING IS YOU CANNOT LIVE TO FLESH & SEE ME AS I AM, FACE TO FACE, YOU MUST GIVE UP ALL ATTACHMENT TO FLESH & THEN YOU CAN SEE ME- & SO RASA EXPLAINS IN DETAIL THE PROCESS OF PRAYER & EMPTINESS WHICH LEADS TO THIS REALIZATION -- THIS STATE IS THE MOST SUBLIME HUMAN CAN REACH AS NOT ONLY MUST ONE RISE ABOVE THE FLESH, BUT ALSO, MUST BE CLOTHED IN GLORY AS MARY OF AGREDA EXPLAINS IN THE MYSTICAL CITY OF GOD
Categories:

Seeing God

Seeing God

Seeing God is both a historical theology and a dogmatic articulation of the beatific vision, of how the invisible God becomes visible to us.

Author: Hans Boersma

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9781467450416

Category: Religion

Page: 488

View: 215

Christianity Today 2019 Book Award for Theology/Ethics To see God is our heart’s desire, our final purpose in life. But what does it mean to see God? And exactly how do we see God—with our physical eyes or with the mind’s eye? In this informed study of the beatific vision, Hans Boersma focuses on “vision” as a living metaphor and shows how the vision of God is not just a future but a present reality. Seeing God is both a historical theology and a dogmatic articulation of the beatific vision, of how the invisible God becomes visible to us. In examining what Christian thinkers throughout history have written about the beatific vision, Boersma explores how God trains us to see his character by transforming our eyes and minds, highlighting continuity from this world to the next. Christ-centered, sacramental, and ecumenical, Boersma’s work presents life as a never-ending journey toward seeing the face of God in Christ both here and in the world to come.
Categories: Religion

The Ethics of Aquinas

The Ethics of Aquinas

an outline of how to conceive it coherently . perspective of the beatific vision ( Ia IIae , q . 4 , He avoids the more specific matter of how one a . 4 ) . One who views the divine essence cannot can actually achieve happiness . help ...

Author: Stephen J. Pope

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 0878408886

Category: Religion

Page: 496

View: 997

In this comprehensive anthology, twenty-seven outstanding scholars from North America and Europe address every major aspect of Thomas Aquinas's understanding of morality and comment on his remarkable legacy. The opening chapters of The Ethics of Aquinas introduce readers to the sources, methods, and major themes of Aquinas's ethics. Part II of the book provides an extended discussion of ideas in the Second Part of the Summa Theologiae, in which contributors present cogent interpretations of the structure, major arguments, and themes of each of the treatises. The third and final part examines the legacy of Thomistic ethics for the twentieth century and today. These essays reflect a diverse group of scholars representing a variety of intellectual perspectives. Contributors span numerous fields of study, including intellectual history, medieval studies, moral philosophy, religious ethics, and moral theology. This remarkable variety underscores how interpretations of Thomas's ethics continue to develop and evolve -- and stimulate fervent discussion within the academy and the church. Book jacket.
Categories: Religion

Light in Darkness

Light in Darkness

Secondly, again as a principle, it is held that the beatific vision is incompatible with the greatest suffering, and so Christ's possession of it while suffering more than anyone else is also rejected. Evaluation of Objections But are ...

Author: Alyssa Lyra Pitstick

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802840394

Category: Religion

Page: 458

View: 301

He descended into hell. Hans Urs von Balthasar, one of the most influential theologians of the twentieth century, placed this affirmation of the Nicene Creed at the heart of his reflection on the world-altering events of Holy Week, asserting that this identification of God with the human experience is at the "absolute center" of the Christian faith. Yet is such a descent to suffering really the essence of Catholic belief about the mystery of Holy Saturday? Alyssa Lyra Pitstick's Light in Darkness -- the first comprehensive treatment of Balthasar's theology of Holy Saturday -- draws on the multiple yet unified resources of authoritative Catholic teaching on Christ's descent to challenge Balthasar's conclusions. Pitstick conducts a thorough investigation of Balthasar's position that Christ suffered in his descent into hell and asks whether that is compatible with traditional teaching about Christ. Light in Darkness is a thorough argument for the existence and authority of a traditional Catholic doctrine of Christ's descent as manifested in creeds, statements of popes and councils, Scripture, and art from Eastern and Western traditions. Pitstick's carefully argued, contrarian work is sure to spur debate across the theological spectrum.
Categories: Religion

Fundamentals of Catholicism God Trinity Creation Christ Mary

Fundamentals of Catholicism  God  Trinity  Creation  Christ  Mary

JESUS ' SUFFERING AND GLORY We have seen that Jesus , because of the Hypostatic Union , possessed the immediate or Beatific Vision of God from the first moment of his conception . This means that Jesus had during his earthly life what ...

Author: Kenneth Baker

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN: 0898700191

Category: Religion

Page: 387

View: 214

Categories: Religion

The Beatific Vision

The Beatific Vision

Author: Samuel Codrington

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0023744676

Category: English poetry

Page: 16

View: 446

Categories: English poetry

Eternal Life and Human Happiness in Heaven

Eternal Life and Human Happiness in Heaven

gage in it, then the beatific vision is measured by time. But, St. Thomas continues, the beatific vision is in eternity (in aeternitate) and not in time. Therefore, it is impossible (impossible) for the blessed to lose the beatific ...

Author: Christopher M. Brown

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 9780813234144

Category: Philosophy

Page: 504

View: 832

Eternal Life and Human Happiness in Heaven treats four apparent problems concerning eternal life in order to clarify our thinking about perfect human happiness in heaven. The teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas provide the basis for solutions to these four problems about eternal life insofar as his teachings call into question common contemporary theological or philosophical presuppositions about God, human persons, and the nature of heaven itself. Indeed, these Thomistic solutions often require us to think very differently from our contemporaries. But thinking differently with St. Thomas is worth it: for the Thomistic solutions to these apparent problems are more satisfying, on both theological and philosophical grounds, than a number of contemporary theological and philosophical approaches. Christopher Brown deploys his argument in four sections. The first section lays out, in three chapters, four apparent problems concerning eternal life—Is heaven a mystical or social reality? Is heaven other-worldly or this-worldly? Is heaven static or dynamic? Won’t human persons eventually get bored in heaven? Brown then explains how and why some important contemporary Christian theologians and philosophers resolve these problems, and notes serious problems with each of these contemporary solutions. The second section explains, in five chapters, St. Thomas’ significant distinction between the essential reward of the saints in heaven and the accidental reward, and treats in detail his account of that in which the essential reward consists, namely, the beatific vision and the proper accidents of the vision (delight, joy, and charity). The third section treats, in five chapters, St. Thomas’ views on the multifaceted accidental reward in heaven, where the accidental reward includes, among other things, glorified human embodiment, participation in the communion of the saints, and the joy experienced by the saints in sensing God’s “new heavens and new earth.” Finally, section four argues, in four chapters, that St. Thomas’ views allow for powerful solutions to the four apparent problems about eternal life examined in the first section. These solutions are powerful because, not only are they consistent with authoritative, Catholic Christian Tradition, but they do not raise any of the significant theological or philosophical problems that attend the contemporary theological and philosophical solutions examined in the first section.
Categories: Philosophy

How Did Jesus Know He Was God

How Did Jesus Know He Was God

Beatific Vision and Infused Science in Christ Maritain holds that Jesus, from the moment of his conception, possessed the beatific vision.14 Maritain's affirmation of the beatific vision in the Incarnate Son is predicated on Jesus' role ...

Author: William Chami

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725260610

Category: Religion

Page: 106

View: 860

The self-consciousness and human knowledge of Christ is a contemporary christological issue which seeks to understand the awareness that the God-man, Jesus Christ, possessed of himself during his life on earth. The present question primarily concerns itself with exploring how the Son knows that he is the Son in his human mind. Traditionally this question has been asked and answered that, through the beatific vision, the Son knew himself as divine in his human mind. However, recent theories advanced by scholars seem to preclude any notion of beatific knowledge in the Incarnate Son. This book explores the perspectives of three main authors, Jacques Maritain, Karl Rahner, and Thomas Weinandy, in relation to the present question, and attempts to provide an answer for how the Incarnate Son apprehended his divine identity through his human operations. Considered also is the scope of Christ's human knowledge with regard to two specific objects of knowledge. These concern whether the Son as man had an awareness of those for whom he gave his life (Gal 2:20) and whether the Son was really ignorant of the eschatological final "day and hour" (Mark 13:32; Matt 24:36).
Categories: Religion

Mystic in the New World

Mystic in the New World

The relative significance of the mystical and beatificvisions ” is an issue in spiritual theology for which a ... In both the Latin and Orthodox traditions the exact nature , timing and scope of the vision of God reserved for the ...

Author: Anya Mali

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004106065

Category: History

Page: 189

View: 636

In contrast to studies which portray Marie de l'Incarnation as a stellar representative of Catholic tradition, and against the scholarly trend in mysticism studies which assumes that mystical writing follows typical patterns, this book focuses on the mystic's fascinating encounter with the natives of New France and its enormous impact on her spiritual self-image.
Categories: History

The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Theology

The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Theology

That is to say , they identify their experience of ecstasy * with the beatific vision . It is for this reason that the Protestant tradition of Christianity has been hesitant about the whole notion of the vision of God .

Author: Alan Richardson

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 0664227481

Category: Religion

Page: 636

View: 345

The Westminter Dictionary of Christian Theology is an important reference for any pastor, scholar, or student of theology. The articles are clearly written, historically informative, and conceptually clarifying. The entries are arranged alphabetically for ease of use.
Categories: Religion

Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues

Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues

the object of the kind of bodily discipline that Paul is describing is to improve the person's chances of attaining the beatific vision, so they can win an imperishable wreath. And perhaps, similarly, Aquinas is thinking of abstinence ...

Author: Mark R. Wynn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192607911

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 959

Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues develops a philosophical appreciation of the spiritual life. The book shows how a certain conception of spiritual good, one that is rooted in Thomas Aquinas's account of infused moral virtue, can generate a distinctive vision of human life and the possibilities for spiritual fulfilment. Wynn examines the character of the goods to which spiritual traditions are directed; the structure of such traditions, including the connection between their practical and creedal commitments; the relationship between the various vocabularies that are used to describe, from the insider's perspective, progress in the spiritual life; the significance of tradition as an epistemic category; and the question of what it takes for a spiritual tradition to be handed on from one person to another. In his account of the virtues, Aquinas shows how our relations to the everyday world can be folded into our relationship to the divine or sacred reality otherwise conceived. In this sense, he offers a vision of how it is possible to live between heaven and earth. Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues considers how that vision can be extended across the central domains of human thought and experience, and how it can deepen and diversify our understanding of what it is for a human life to be lived well.
Categories: Religion

Themelios Volume 38 Issue 2

Themelios  Volume 38  Issue 2

reason, it might surprise some that he had so much to say about the beatific vision—the focus of McDonald's essay. But this assumption would be misguided and would evidence an undue prejudice against Puritan theology.

Author: D. A. Carson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781625649591

Category: Religion

Page: 158

View: 901

Themelios is an international, evangelical, peer-reviewed theological journal that expounds and defends the historic Christian faith. Themelios is published three times a year online at The Gospel Coalition (http://thegospelcoalition.org/themelios/) and in print by Wipf and Stock. Its primary audience is theological students and pastors, though scholars read it as well. Themelios began in 1975 and was operated by RTSF/UCCF in the UK, and it became a digital journal operated by The Gospel Coalition in 2008. The editorial team draws participants from across the globe as editors, essayists, and reviewers. General Editor: D. A. Carson, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Managing Editor: Brian Tabb, Bethlehem College and Seminary Consulting Editor: Michael J. Ovey, Oak Hill Theological College Administrator: Andrew David Naselli, Bethlehem College and Seminary Book Review Editors: Jerry Hwang, Singapore Bible College; Alan Thompson, Sydney Missionary & Bible College; Nathan A. Finn, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Hans Madueme, Covenant College; Dane Ortlund, Crossway; Jason Sexton, Golden Gate Baptist Seminary Editorial Board: Gerald Bray, Beeson Divinity School Lee Gatiss, Wales Evangelical School of Theology Paul Helseth, University of Northwestern, St. Paul Paul House, Beeson Divinity School Ken Magnuson, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Jonathan Pennington, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary James Robson, Wycliffe Hall Mark D. Thompson, Moore Theological College Paul Williamson, Moore Theological College Stephen Witmer, Pepperell Christian Fellowship Robert Yarbrough, Covenant Seminary
Categories: Religion

Beatific Vision

Beatific Vision

Giuseppe Morreti, commander of an elite branch of the Vatican military known as the Milvian Guard, wakes one night from a dream of Liliths angelic punishers.

Author: Jordan Spiece

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781546248781

Category: Fiction

Page: 294

View: 525

Giuseppe Morreti, commander of an elite branch of the Vatican military known as the Milvian Guard, wakes one night from a dream of Liliths angelic punishers. Rebuked for her disobedience of Adam, Lilith has been separated from God, but now, her children plot revenge with members of a new Roman power, Domus Aurea. Rome is under siege, and it appears evil is winning. Those residing and visiting Rome are captives, unable to move about or escape without fear of death. However, a higher power is in their midst as angels keep watch, unbeknownst to the Vatican or Domus Aurea. Giuseppe is dragged into a tug-of-war between the people of Rome and the demons attempting to take over when two unassuming young men get involved. Daven and Adam have no great notions of fame or grandeur. Their only concern is for the safety of their loved ones, so they will fight the children of Lilith and anyone else who stands in their way. Rome is now a breeding ground of upheaval, but there is hope as humanity takes on the supernatural, saving the Vatican and possibly the world.
Categories: Fiction

Duns Scotus

Duns Scotus

The beatific vision After death, the saints whom God has predestined enjoy the vision of God in heaven. The medievals discerned both a cognitive and an appetitive aspect to this. The vision of the Trinity of persons is a cognitive act.

Author: Richard Cross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195352252

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 679

This is an accessible introduction to the life and thought of John Duns Scotus (c. 1266--1308), the scholastic philosopher and theologian who came to be called the Subtle Doctor. A native of Scotland (as his name implies), Scotus became a Franciscan and taught in Oxford, Paris, and Cologne. In his writings he put Aristotelian thought to the service of Christian theology and was the founder of a school of scholasticism called Scotism, which was often opposed to the Thomism of the followers of Thomas Aquinas. In particular, Scotus is well known for his defense of contra-causal free will and logical possibility and for his account of individuation in terms of "haecceity" or "thisness." Cross offers a clear introductory account of the most significant aspects of Scotus's theological thought. Theology is here construed broadly to include Scotus's philosophical investigation of God's existence and attributes. In addition to providing a clear, though not always uncritical, outline of Scotus's positions, Cross aims to show how Scotus's theories fit into modern debates, particularly contemporary debates in philosophical theology, and to point out Scotus's historical significance in the development of theology.
Categories: Philosophy

Suffering and the Christian Life

Suffering and the Christian Life

This becoming of created persons must occur outside the beatific vision. It is only in the order of grace, where the created spirit must not of necessity embrace God as the Infinite Good, and not in the order of vision (the beatific ...

Author: Richard W. Miller

Publisher: Orbis Books

ISBN: 9781608332809

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 712

Categories: Religion

Jesus the Mediator

Jesus the Mediator

Christ's reception of the beatific vision is the basic and fundamental condition of his consciousness, although the vision is not consciousness itself.9 Christ's posterior human reflection tatively but not infallibly pronounced.

Author: William Brownsberger

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 9780813221199

Category: Religion

Page: 170

View: 121

In Jesus the Mediator, William L. Brownsberger offers an account of the human psychology assumed by the Second Person of the Trinity in light of its salvific significance
Categories: Religion

The Trinitarian Christology of St Thomas Aquinas

The Trinitarian Christology of St Thomas Aquinas

human knowledge, both of which are supernatural: first, Christ's beatific vision, and then his divinely infused knowledge. A. THE BEATIFIC VISION AND THE HOLY SPIRIT The beatific vision is the highest form of Christ's human knowledge.

Author: Dominic Legge

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198794196

Category:

Page: 256

View: 635

The Trinitarian Christology of St Thomas Aquinas brings to light the Trinitarian riches in Thomas Aquinas's Christology. Dominic Legge, O.P, disproves Karl Rahner's assertion that Aquinas divorces the study of Christ from the Trinity, by offering a stimulating re-reading of Aquinas on his own terms, as a profound theologian of the Trinitarian mystery of God as manifested in and through Christ. Legge highlights that, for Aquinas, Christology is intrinsically Trinitarian, in its origin and its principles, its structure, and its role in the dispensation of salvation. He investigates the Trinitarian shape of the incarnation itself: the visible mission of the Son, sent by the Father, implicating the invisible mission of the Holy Spirit to his assumed human nature. For Aquinas, Christ's humanity, at its deepest foundations, incarnates the very personal being of the divine Son and Word of the Father, and hence every action of Christ reveals the Father, is from the Father, and leads back to the Father. This study also uncovers a remarkable Spirit Christology in Aquinas: Christ as man stands in need of the Spirit's anointing to carry out his saving work; his supernatural human knowledge is dependent on the Spirit's gift; and it is the Spirit who moves and guides him in every action, from Nazareth to Golgotha.
Categories:

Christ Unabridged

Christ Unabridged

Rather, we need to gain some insight into the whole process from source to term, and Christ's possession of the beatific vision enables us to do this up to a point, because in it we can verify the impact of divine knowledge on the human ...

Author: George Westhaver

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN: 9780334058281

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 213

The title ‘the Son of Man’ evokes the different aspects of the whole Christ: the humanity and divinity of Christ, his earthly ministry, his sacramental presence, and the eschatological consummation of his work. It is also a term of relationship, suggestive of both the relations constitutive of the life of the Holy Trinity, and also of the way that our knowing and loving the Son of Man is always an invitation to communion - with the Triune God, as the Body of Christ, and for the life of the world. Contributors to this collection explore some of the many registers of the mystery of Christ, both historically and thematically. Contributors include some of today’s leading theological thinkers, including N.T. Wright, Rowan Williams, Lydia Schumacher, Kallistos Ware and Oliver O’Donovan. With poetic reflections from Malcolm Guite. Chapters include: "Son of Man and the New Creation" (N.T. Wright), "The Son of Man in the Gospel of John" (John Behr), "Sound and Silence in Augustine’s Christological Exegesis" (Carol Harrison), "According to the Flesh?: The Problem of Knowing Christ in Chalcedonian Perspective" (Ian Mcfarland), "Christ and the Moral Life" (Oliver O'Donovan), "Christ and the Poetic Imagination" (Malcolm Guite)
Categories: Religion

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

The debate regarding the soul's ability to see the Lord—the beatific vision—heated up in the 1330s.58 The church frescoes and Clement Bible offer visual correlates of texts supporting a soul's immediate ability to view God at death—an ...

Author: CathleenA. Fleck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351545532

Category: Art

Page: 370

View: 325

As a 'biography' of the fourteenth-century illustrated Bible of Clement VII, an opposition pope in Avignon from 1378-94, this social history traces the Bible's production in Naples (c. 1330) through its changing ownership and meaning in Avignon (c. 1340-1405) to its presentation as a gift to Alfonso, King of Aragon (c. 1424). The author's novel approach, based on solid art historical and anthropological methodologies, allows her to assess the object's evolving significance and the use of such a Bible to enhance the power and prestige of its princely and papal owners. Through archival sources, the author pinpoints the physical location and privileged treatment of the Clement Bible over a century. The author considers how the Bible's contexts in the collection of a bishop, several popes, and a king demonstrate the value of the Bible as an exchange commodity. The Bible was undoubtedly valued for the aesthetic quality of its 200+ luxurious images. Additionally, the author argues that its iconography, especially Jerusalem and visionary scenes, augments its worth as a reflection of contemporary political and religious issues. Its images offered biblical precedents, its style represented associations with certain artists and regions in Italy, and its past provided links to important collections. Fleck's examination of the art production around the Bible in Naples and Avignon further illuminates the manuscript's role as a reflection of the court cultures in those cities. Adding to recent art historical scholarship focusing on the taste and signature styles in late medieval and Renaissance courts, this study provides new information about workshop practices and techniques. In these two court cities, the author analyzes styles associated with different artists, different patrons, and even with different rooms of the rulers' palaces, offering new findings relevant to current scholarship, not only in art history but also in court and collection studies.
Categories: Art