Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Second Edition

Author: Valerie L. Gaus

Publisher: Guilford Publications

ISBN: 1462537723

Category: Psychology

Page: 312

View: 2513

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Now revised and expanded, this is the leading resource for psychotherapists working with adults who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) without significant cognitive and language impairments (also known as Asperger syndrome). Valerie L. Gaus shows how to adapt the proven techniques of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to build clients' social and coping skills, facilitate self-acceptance, and treat comorbid anxiety and depression. Illustrated with detailed case examples, the book is grounded in cutting-edge knowledge about information-processing differences in ASD. It gives clinicians critical guidance for conceptualizing these clients' presenting problems and optimizing the effectiveness of interventions. Reproducible worksheets can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size. First edition title: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult Asperger Syndrome. New to This Edition *Explains the significant terminology changes in DSM-5 and their impact. *Chapter on mindfulness-based strategies for emotion regulation problems. *Additional strategies and resources for teaching social and coping skills. *Describes new and updated assessment instruments. *Incorporates cutting-edge research on CBT and on clinical problems associated with ASD. See also the author's related self-help resource, Living Well on the Spectrum, an ideal client recommendation.
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The Practice of Folklore

Essays toward a Theory of Tradition

Author: Simon J. Bronner

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496822641

Category: Social Science

Page: 382

View: 6379

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Despite predictions that commercial mass culture would displace customs of the past, traditions firmly abound, often characterized as folklore. In The Practice of Folklore: Essays toward a Theory of Tradition, author Simon J. Bronner works with theories of cultural practice to explain the social and psychological need for tradition in everyday life. Bronner proposes a distinctive “praxic” perspective that will answer the pressing philosophical as well as psychological question of why people enjoy repeating themselves. The significance of the keyword practice, he asserts, is the embodiment of a tension between repetition and variation in human behavior. Thinking with practice, particularly in a digital world, forces redefinitions of folklore and a reorientation toward interpreting everyday life. More than performance or enactment in social theory, practice connects localized culture with the vernacular idea that “this is the way we do things around here.” Practice refers to the way those things are analyzed as part of, rather than apart from, theory, thus inviting the study of studying. “The way we do things” invokes the social basis of “doing” in practice as cultural and instrumental. Building on previous studies of tradition in relation to creativity, Bronner presents an overview of practice theory and the ways it might be used in folklore and folklife studies. Demonstrating the application of this theory in folkloristic studies, Bronner offers four provocative case studies of psychocultural meanings that arise from traditional frames of action and address issues of our times: referring to the boogieman; connecting “wild child” beliefs to school shootings; deciphering the offensive chants of sports fans; and explicating male bravado in bawdy singing. Turning his analysis to the analysts of tradition, Bronner uses practice theory to evaluate the agenda of folklorists in shaping perceptions of tradition-centered “folk societies” such as the Amish. He further unpacks the culturally based rationale of public folklore programming. He interprets the evolving idea of folk museums in a digital world and assesses how the folklorists' terms and actions affect how people think about tradition.
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The Nine Degrees of Autism

A Developmental Model for the Alignment and Reconciliation of Hidden Neurological Conditions

Author: Philip Wylie,Wenn Lawson,Luke Beardon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317500687

Category: Psychology

Page: 182

View: 8192

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The Nine Degrees of Autism presents a much-needed positive tool for understanding the developmental process of autism, and to facilitate the improved mental health and well-being of individuals on the spectrum. The ground-breaking model charts nine distinct stages of development - from pre-identification, to learning to live with changes in self-image following a late diagnosis, through to self-acceptance and wellbeing. Using the model as a framework each chapter focuses on a particular stage of the process. Experts provide personal insights into the environmental and societal challenges faced by individuals with autism, and dispel a number of popular misconceptions. The positive developmental model described in this book will encourage people on the Spectrum to accept themselves by focusing on their gifts rather than weaknesses, and to avoid identifying with negative medical classifications. The developmental process which the authors describe is also applicable to other ‘hidden’ neurological conditions such as Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Aphasia, and ADHD. The book should be read by anyone who wants to understand the real nature and experience of autism and will also be essential reading for a range of professionals seeking to work more effectively with individuals on the spectrum.
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