Bananaworld

Bananaworld

The result is a subversive but entertaining book that is accessible and interesting to a wide range of readers, with the novel thesis that quantum mechanics is about the structure of information.

Author: Jeffrey Bub

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198718536

Category: Science

Page: 273

View: 344

What on earth do bananas have to do with quantum mechanics? From a modern perspective, quantum mechanics is about strangely counterintuitive correlations between separated systems, which can be exploited in feats like quantum teleportation, unbreakable cryptographic schemes, and computers with enormously enhanced computing power. Schro?dinger coined the term "entanglement" to describe these bizarre correlations. Bananaworld -- an imaginary island with "entangled" bananas -- brings to life the fascinating discoveries of the new field of quantum information without the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics. The connection with quantum correlations is fully explained in sections written for the non-physicist reader with a serious interest in understanding the mysteries of the quantum world. The result is a subversive but entertaining book that is accessible and interesting to a wide range of readers, with the novel thesis that quantum mechanics is about the structure of information. What we have discovered is that the possibilities for representing, manipulating, and communicating information are very different than we thought.
Categories: Science

Bananaworld

Bananaworld

Information theory is essentially about correlations, and the novel approach of 'Bananaworld' is to get at what's counterintuitive about quantum information by considering correlations between normally mundane experiences that every reader ...

Author: Jeffrey Bub

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191819646

Category: Information theory

Page:

View: 533

Information theory is essentially about correlations, and the novel approach of 'Bananaworld' is to get at what's counterintuitive about quantum information by considering correlations between normally mundane experiences that every reader can relate to.
Categories: Information theory

Understanding Quantum Raffles

Understanding Quantum Raffles

The volume you just got yourself entangled with was inspired by Jeffrey Bub's (2016) Bananaworld: Quantum Mechanics for Primates. Our original plan had been to contribute an article to a special issue of the journal Studies in History ...

Author: Michel Janssen

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030859398

Category: Electronic books

Page: 247

View: 921

This book offers a thorough technical elaboration and philosophical defense of an objectivist informational interpretation of quantum mechanics according to which its novel content is located in its kinematical framework, that is, in how the theory describes systems independently of the specifics of their dynamics. It will be of interest to researchers and students in the philosophy of physics and in theoretical physics with an interest in the foundations of quantum mechanics. Additionally, parts of the book may be used as the basis for courses introducing non-physics majors to quantum mechanics, or for self-study by those outside of the university with an interest in quantum mechanics. With a Foreword by Jeffrey Bub. -- “Understanding Quantum Raffles is a wonderful book for both the specialists and those with curious minds. The elegance and the simplicity with which the 'three Mikes' explain some of the deepest aspects of quantum mechanics on the basis of probabilities and correlations are dazzling and delightful. The same elegance and simplicity also make the book ideal for any engaged reader who ever wondered what is so special about quantum mechanics. In our age of new quantum technologies, this is something anyone should read.” (Guido Bacciagaluppi, author of Quantum Theory at the Crossroads) “This book makes a sustained argument for an informational interpretation of quantum theory, blending an elegant mathematical characterisation of quantum correlations with incisive historical and philosophical analysis. A must-read for those interested in quantum foundations, and also a fertile source of teaching inspiration for quantum theory.” (Leah Henderson, author of Philosophy of quantum information and entanglement) “This is one of the most fascinating and accessible presentations of the informational approach to quantum mechanics. What has so far been mostly restricted to the theoretical physics community is here masterfully explained for a broader audience even without a physics background. Scholars, students, and laypeople alike will appreciate the clear, vivid, and yet deep discussion of what raffle tickets and correlation elliptopes can tell us about the physics and philosophy of the quantum world.” (Markus Müller, Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austria).
Categories: Electronic books

Philosophers Look at Quantum Mechanics

Philosophers Look at Quantum Mechanics

Bananaworld: Quantum mechanics for primates (p. 211). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Bub, J., & Pitowsky, I. (2010). Two dogmas about quantum mechanics. In S. Saunders, J. Barrett, A. Kent, & D. Wallace (Eds.), Many worlds?

Author: Alberto Cordero

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030156596

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 507

This edited volume explores the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics. It features papers from venues of the International Ontology Congress (IOC) up to 2016. IOC is a worldwide platform for dialogue and reflection on the interactions between science and philosophy. The collection features philosophers as well as physicists, including David Albert, Harvey Brown, Jeffrey Bub, Otávio Bueno, James Cushing, Steven French, Victor Gomez-Pin, Carl Hoefer, Simon Kochen, Peter Lewis, Tim Maudlin, Peter Mittlestatedt, Roland Omnès, Juha Saatsi, Albert Solé, David Wallace, and Anton Zeilinger. Since the early days of quantum mechanics, philosophers have studied the subject with growing technical skill and fruitfulness. Their efforts have unveiled intellectual bridges between physics and philosophy. These connections have helped fuel the contemporary debate about the scope and limits of realism and understanding in the interpretation of physical theories and scientific theories in general. The philosophical analysis of quantum mechanics is now one of the most sophisticated and productive areas in contemporary philosophy, as the papers in this collection illustrate.
Categories: Science

Quantum Mechanics and Fundamentality

Quantum Mechanics and Fundamentality

Naturalizing Quantum Theory between Scientific Realism and Ontological Indeterminacy Valia Allori. As an example, we take Evandro Agazzi's account of scientific ... Bananaworld: Quantum mechanics for primates. Oxford University Press.

Author: Valia Allori

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030996420

Category: Science

Page: 417

View: 843

This edited collection provides new perspectives on some metaphysical questions arising in quantum mechanics. These questions have been long-standing and are of continued interest to researchers and graduate students working in physics, philosophy of physics, and metaphysics. It features contributions from a diverse set of researchers, ranging from senior scholars to junior academics, working in varied fields, from physics to philosophy of physics and metaphysics. The contributors reflect on issues about fundamentality (is quantum theory fundamental? If so, what is its fundamental ontology?), ontological dependence (how do ordinary objects exist even if they are not fundamental?), realism (what kind of realism is compatible with quantum theory?), indeterminacy (can the world itself exhibit ontological indeterminacy?). The book contains contributions from both physicists (including Nobel Prize winner Gerard 't Hooft), science communicators and philosophers.
Categories: Science

Quantum Mechanics Between Ontology and Epistemology

Quantum Mechanics Between Ontology and Epistemology

Interpretating the quantum world. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press. Bub, J. 2016. Bananaworld: Quantum mechanics for primates. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press. Buchler, J., ed. 1955.

Author: Florian J. Boge

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319957654

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 795

This book explores the prospects of rivaling ontological and epistemic interpretations of quantum mechanics (QM). It concludes with a suggestion for how to interpret QM from an epistemological point of view and with a Kantian touch. It thus refines, extends, and combines existing approaches in a similar direction. The author first looks at current, hotly debated ontological interpretations. These include hidden variables-approaches, Bohmian mechanics, collapse interpretations, and the many worlds interpretation. He demonstrates why none of these ontological interpretations can claim to be the clear winner amongst its rivals. Next, coverage explores the possibility of interpreting QM in terms of knowledge but without the assumption of hidden variables. It examines QBism as well as Healey’s pragmatist view. The author finds both interpretations or programs appealing, but still wanting in certain respects. As a result, he then goes on to advance a genuine proposal as to how to interpret QM from the perspective of an internal realism in the sense of Putnam and Kant. The book also includes two philosophical interludes. One details the notions of probability and realism. The other highlights the connections between the notions of locality, causality, and reality in the context of violations of Bell-type inequalities.
Categories: Science

Quantum Probability Logic

Quantum  Probability  Logic

Bananaworld: Quantum mechanics for primates. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Bub, J. (2020). 'Two Dogmas' Redux. In Hemmo, M., Shenker, O. (eds.) Quantum, probability, logic: Itamar Pitowsky's work and influence. Cham: Springer.

Author: Meir Hemmo

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030343163

Category: Science

Page: 627

View: 330

This volume provides a broad perspective on the state of the art in the philosophy and conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics. Its essays take their starting point in the work and influence of Itamar Pitowsky, who has greatly influenced our understanding of what is characteristically non-classical about quantum probabilities and quantum logic, and this serves as a vantage point from which they reflect on key ongoing debates in the field. Readers will find a definitive and multi-faceted description of the major open questions in the foundations of quantum mechanics today, including: Is quantum mechanics a new theory of (contextual) probability? Should the quantum state be interpreted objectively or subjectively? How should probability be understood in the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics? What are the limits of the physical implementation of computation? The impact of this volume goes beyond the exposition of Pitowsky’s influence: it provides a unique collection of essays by leading thinkers containing profound reflections on the field. Chapter 1. Classical logic, classical probability, and quantum mechanics (Samson Abramsky) Chapter 2. Why Scientific Realists Should Reject the Second Dogma of Quantum Mechanic (Valia Allori) Chapter 3. Unscrambling Subjective and Epistemic Probabilities (Guido Bacciagaluppi) Chapter 4. Wigner’s Friend as a Rational Agent (Veronika Baumann, Časlav Brukner) Chapter 5. Pitowsky's Epistemic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and the PBR Theorem (Yemima Ben-Menahem) Chapter 6. On the Mathematical Constitution and Explanation of Physical Facts (Joseph Berkovitz) Chapter 7. Everettian probabilities, the Deutsch-Wallace theorem and the Principal Principle (Harvey R. Brown, Gal Ben Porath) Chapter 8. ‘Two Dogmas’ Redu (Jeffrey Bub) Chapter 9. Physical Computability Theses (B. Jack Copeland, Oron Shagrir) Chapter 10. Agents in Healey’s Pragmatist Quantum Theory: A Comparison with Pitowsky’s Approach to Quantum Mechanics (Mauro Dorato) Chapter 11. Quantum Mechanics As a Theory of Observables and States and, Thereby, As a Theory of Probability (John Earman, Laura Ruetsche) Chapter 12. The Measurement Problem and two Dogmas about Quantum Mechanic (Laura Felline) Chapter 13. There Is More Than One Way to Skin a Cat: Quantum Information Principles In a Finite World(Amit Hagar) Chapter 14. Is Quantum Mechanics a New Theory of Probability? (Richard Healey) Chapter 15. Quantum Mechanics as a Theory of Probability (Meir Hemmo, Orly Shenker) Chapter 16. On the Three Types of Bell's Inequalities (Gábor Hofer-Szabó) Chapter 17. On the Descriptive Power of Probability Logic (Ehud Hrushovski) Chapter 18. The Argument against Quantum Computers (Gil Kalai) Chapter 19. Why a Relativistic Quantum Mechanical World Must be Indeterministic (Avi Levy, Meir Hemmo) Chapter 20. Subjectivists about Quantum Probabilities Should be Realists about Quantum States (Wayne C. Myrvold) Chapter 21. The Relativistic Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Argument (Michael Redhead) Chapter 22. What price statistical independence? How Einstein missed the photon.(Simon Saunders) Chapter 23. How (Maximally) Contextual is Quantum Mechanics? (Andrew W. Simmons) Chapter 24. Roots and (Re)Sources of Value (In)Definiteness Versus Contextuality (Karl Svozil) Chapter 25: Schrödinger’s Reaction to the EPR Paper (Jos Uffink) Chapter 26. Derivations of the Born Rule (Lev Vaidman) Chapter 27. Dynamical States and the Conventionality of (Non-) Classicality (Alexander Wilce).
Categories: Science

Quantum Computing in the Arts and Humanities

Quantum Computing in the Arts and Humanities

Bananaworld, quantum mechanics for primates. Oxford University Press. Bub, J., & Pitowsky, I. (2010). Two dogmas about quantum mechanics. In S. Saunders, J. Barrett, A. Kent, & D. Wallace (Eds.), Many worlds? Everett, quantum theory ...

Author: Eduardo Reck Miranda

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030955380

Category:

Page:

View: 249

Categories:

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Quantum Interpretations

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Quantum Interpretations

Bananaworld : Quantum Mechanics for Primates . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Cabello , A. ( 2012 ) . The contextual computer . In H. Zenil ( ed . ) , A Computable Universe : Understanding and Exploring Nature as Computation ...

Author: Olival Freire Jr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198844495

Category:

Page: 1312

View: 444

This Oxford Handbook provides a rigorous, interdisciplinary review of the history of interpretations of quantum physics, presenting the key controversies within the field, as well as outlining its successes and its extraordinary potential across various scientific fields.
Categories:

Information and Interaction

Information and Interaction

Brukner, ˇC., Zeilinger, A.: Conceptual inadequacy of the Shannon information in quantum measurements. Phys. Rev. A 63,022113 (2001) 9. Bub, J.: Bananaworld: Quantum Mechanics for Primates. Oxford University Press, Oxford, p.

Author: Ian T. Durham

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319437606

Category: Science

Page: 212

View: 849

In this essay collection, leading physicists, philosophers, and historians attempt to fill the empty theoretical ground in the foundations of information and address the related question of the limits to our knowledge of the world. Over recent decades, our practical approach to information and its exploitation has radically outpaced our theoretical understanding - to such a degree that reflection on the foundations may seem futile. But it is exactly fields such as quantum information, which are shifting the boundaries of the physically possible, that make a foundational understanding of information increasingly important. One of the recurring themes of the book is the claim by Eddington and Wheeler that information involves interaction and putting agents or observers centre stage. Thus, physical reality, in their view, is shaped by the questions we choose to put to it and is built up from the information residing at its core. This is the root of Wheeler’s famous phrase “it from bit.” After reading the stimulating essays collected in this volume, readers will be in a good position to decide whether they agree with this view.
Categories: Science