Banana

The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World

Author: Dan Koeppel

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101213919

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 4796

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A gripping biological detective story that uncovers the myth, mystery, and endangered fate of the world’s most humble fruit To most people, a banana is a banana: a simple yellow fruit. Americans eat more bananas than apples and oranges combined. In others parts of the world, bananas are what keep millions of people alive. But for all its ubiquity, the banana is surprisingly mysterious; nobody knows how bananas evolved or exactly where they originated. Rich cultural lore surrounds the fruit: In ancient translations of the Bible, the “apple” consumed by Eve is actually a banana (it makes sense, doesn’t it?). Entire Central American nations have been said to rise and fall over the banana. But the biggest mystery about the banana today is whether it will survive. A seedless fruit with a unique reproductive system, every banana is a genetic duplicate of the next, and therefore susceptible to the same blights. Today’s yellow banana, the Cavendish, is increasingly threatened by such a blight—and there’s no cure in sight. Banana combines a pop-science journey around the globe, a fascinating tale of an iconic American business enterprise, and a look into the alternately tragic and hilarious banana subculture (one does exist)—ultimately taking us to the high-tech labs where new bananas are literally being built in test tubes, in a race to save the world’s most beloved fruit.
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Banana Wars

Power, Production, and History in the Americas

Author: Steve Striffler,Mark Moberg,Gilbert M. Joseph,Emily S. Rosenberg

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822331964

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 364

View: 7699

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DIVThe history of banana cultivation and its huge impact on Latin American, history, politics, and culture./div
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Where Am I Eating?

An Adventure Through the Global Food Economy with Discussion Questions and a Guide to Going "Glocal"

Author: Kelsey Timmerman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118966546

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 2238

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A deeply human-centered perspective on the origins of America'sfood Where Am I Eating? bridges the gap between global foodproducers and the American consumer, providing an insightful lookat how our eating habits affect farmers and fishermen around theworld. Follow the author on his global quest to meet the workersthat nurture, harvest, and hunt our food, as he works alongsidethem—loading lobster diving boats in Nicaragua, harvestingbananas in Costa Rica, lugging cocoa beans in Ivory Coast with amodern-day slave, picking coffee beans in Colombia and haulingtomatoes in Indiana. This new edition includes a study guide, adeeper explanation of the "glocal" concept, and advice for studentslooking to become engaged as both local and global citizens.Arguing neither for nor against globalization, this book simplyexplores the lives of those who feed us. Imports account for eighty-six percent of America's seafood,fifty percent of its fresh fruit, and eighteen percent of its freshvegetables. Where Am I Eating? examines the effects of thisreliance on those who supply the global food economy. Learn more about the global producers that feed our nation, andlearn from their worldviews intensely connected to people andplanet Discover how food preferences and trends affect the lives offarmers and fishermen Catch a boots-on-the-ground glimpse of the daily lives of foodproducers on four continents Meet a modern-day slave and explore the blurred line betweenexploitation and opportunity Observe how the poorest producers fare in the global foodeconomy This book takes a human-centered approach to food, investigatingthe lives of the people at the other end of the global foodeconomy, observing the hope and opportunity—or lackthereof—that results from our reliance on imports. WhereAm I Eating? is a touching, insightful, informative look at theorigins of our food.
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The Fish That Ate the Whale

The Life and Times of America's Banana King

Author: Rich Cohen

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429946296

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4208

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A legendary tale, both true and astonishing, from the author of Israel is Real and Sweet and Low When Samuel Zemurray arrived in America in 1891, he was tall, gangly, and penniless. When he died in the grandest house in New Orleans sixty-nine years later, he was among the richest, most powerful men in the world. In between, he worked as a fruit peddler, a banana hauler, a dockside hustler, and a plantation owner. He battled and conquered the United Fruit Company, becoming a symbol of the best and worst of the United States: proof that America is the land of opportunity, but also a classic example of the corporate pirate who treats foreign nations as the backdrop for his adventures. In Latin America, when people shouted "Yankee, go home!" it was men like Zemurray they had in mind. Rich Cohen's brilliant historical profile The Fish That Ate the Whale unveils Zemurray as a hidden kingmaker and capitalist revolutionary, driven by an indomitable will to succeed. Known as El Amigo, the Gringo, or simply Z, the Banana Man lived one of the great untold stories of the last hundred years. Starting with nothing but a cart of freckled bananas, he built a sprawling empire of banana cowboys, mercenary soldiers, Honduran peasants, CIA agents, and American statesmen. From hustling on the docks of New Orleans to overthrowing Central American governments, from feuding with Huey Long to working with the Dulles brothers, Zemurray emerges as an unforgettable figure, connected to the birth of modern American diplomacy, public relations, business, and war—a monumental life that reads like a parable of the American dream.
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The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0199734968

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 2182

View: 7964

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The second edition of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, originally published in September 2004, covers the significant events, inventions, and social movements that have shaped the way Americans view, prepare, and consume food and drink. Entries range across historical periods and the trends that characterize them. The thoroughly updated new edition captures the shifting American perspective on food and is the most authoritative and the most current reference work on American cuisine.
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The Pecan

A History of America's Native Nut

Author: James McWilliams

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292749163

Category: Nature

Page: 178

View: 6968

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Traces the historical and cultural paths of the pecan, while weaving American history, agricultural history, and science into the story.
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The Sacred Table

Creating a Jewish Food Ethic

Author: Mary L. Zamore

Publisher: CCAR Press

ISBN: 088123186X

Category: Religion

Page: 564

View: 3241

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The Sacred Table: Creating a Jewish Food Ethic is an anthology of diverse essays on Jewish dietary practices. This volume presents the challenge of navigating through choices about eating, while seeking to create a rich dialogue about the intersection of Judaism and food. The definition of Kashrut, the historic Jewish approach to eating, is explored, broadened and in some cases, argued with, in these essays. Kashrut is viewed not only as a ritual practice, but also as a multifaceted Jewish relationship with food and its production, integrating values such as ethics, community, and spirituality into our dietary practice. The questions considered in The Sacred Table are broad reaching. Does Kashrut represent a facade of religiosity, hiding immorality and abuse, or is it, in its purest form, a summons to raise the ethical standards of food production? How does Kashrut enrich spiritual practice by teaching intentionality and gratitude? Can paying attention to our own eating practices raise our awareness of the hungry? Can Kashrut inspire us to eat healthfully? Can these laws draw us around the same table, thus creating community? In exploring the complexities of these questions, this book includes topics such as agricultural workers' rights, animal rights, food production, the environment, personal health, the spirituality of eating and fasting, and the challenges of eating together. The Sacred Table celebrates the ideology of educated choice. The essays present a diverse range of voices, opinions, and options, highlighting the Jewish values that shape our food ethics. Whether for the individual, family, or community, this book supplies the basic how-tos of creating a meaningful Jewish food ethic and incorporating these choices into our personal and communal religious practices. These resources will be helpful if we are new to these ideas or if we are teaching or counseling others. Picture a beautiful buffet of choices from which you can shape your personal Kashrut. Read, educate yourself, build on those practices that you already follow, and eat well.
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Chop Suey, USA

The Story of Chinese Food in America

Author: Yong Chen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538162

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 7594

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American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.
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Edible Memory

The Lure of Heirloom Tomatoes and Other Forgotten Foods

Author: Jennifer A. Jordan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022622824X

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 540

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Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.
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