Augustus to Constantine

Augustus to Constantine

First published in 1970, Grant's classic is enhanced with a new foreward by Margaret M. Mitchell, which assesses its importance and puts the reader in touch with the advances of current research.

Author: Robert McQueen Grant

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 0664227724

Category: Religion

Page: 350

View: 488

This masterful study of the early centuries of Christianity vividly brings to life the religious, political, and cultural developments through which the faith that began as a sect within Judaism became finally the religion of the Roman empire. First published in 1970, Grant's classic is enhanced with a new foreward by Margaret M. Mitchell, which assesses its importance and puts the reader in touch with the advances of current research.
Categories: Religion

The History of the Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine

The History of the Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine

Constantine suspected him ; and fearing that his design was either still to detain
him at Nicomedia under some pretence or other , or to have time to send to
Severus , through whose territories he was probably directed to pass , orders to
stop ...

Author: Jean Baptiste Louis Crevier

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015073722632

Category: Emperors

Page:

View: 649

Categories: Emperors

Ten Caesars

Ten Caesars

In this essential and “enlightening” (The New York Times Book Review) work, Barry Strauss tells the story of the Roman Empire from rise to reinvention, from Augustus, who founded the empire, to Constantine, who made it Christian and ...

Author: Barry Strauss

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

ISBN: 9781451668841

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 764

Bestselling classical historian Barry Strauss delivers “an exceptionally accessible history of the Roman Empire…much of Ten Caesars reads like a script for Game of Thrones” (The Wall Street Journal)—a summation of three and a half centuries of the Roman Empire as seen through the lives of ten of the most important emperors, from Augustus to Constantine. In this essential and “enlightening” (The New York Times Book Review) work, Barry Strauss tells the story of the Roman Empire from rise to reinvention, from Augustus, who founded the empire, to Constantine, who made it Christian and moved the capital east to Constantinople. During these centuries Rome gained in splendor and territory, then lost both. By the fourth century, the time of Constantine, the Roman Empire had changed so dramatically in geography, ethnicity, religion, and culture that it would have been virtually unrecognizable to Augustus. Rome’s legacy remains today in so many ways, from language, law, and architecture to the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Strauss examines this enduring heritage through the lives of the men who shaped it: Augustus, Tiberius, Nero, Vespasian, Trajan, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Septimius Severus, Diocletian, and Constantine. Over the ages, they learned to maintain the family business—the government of an empire—by adapting when necessary and always persevering no matter the cost. Ten Caesars is a “captivating narrative that breathes new life into a host of transformative figures” (Publishers Weekly). This “superb summation of four centuries of Roman history, a masterpiece of compression, confirms Barry Strauss as the foremost academic classicist writing for the general reader today” (The Wall Street Journal).
Categories: History

Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage from Augustus to Constantine

Religion and Authority in Roman Carthage from Augustus to Constantine

This book examines the organization of religion in the Roman empire from Augustus to Constantine.

Author: J. B. Rives

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: UVA:X002701545

Category: Religion

Page: 334

View: 134

The importance of Christianity was thus that it provided the model for a new type of religious control suited to the needs of the increasingly homogeneous Roman empire.
Categories: Religion

The History of the Roman Emperors

The History of the Roman Emperors

This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 0461482851

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 336

Categories: History

Roman Art and Architecture

Roman Art and Architecture

An introduction to Roman imperial art and architecture, designed for use by secondary students.

Author: Jonathan Campbell

Publisher:

ISBN: 0582739845

Category: Architecture, Roman

Page: 116

View: 822

An introduction to Roman imperial art and architecture, designed for use by secondary students. Describes all pieces set for this section of the Form Seven Classical studies course, while also covering other relevant works of art from the period. Suggested level: senior secondary.
Categories: Architecture, Roman

Emperors of Rome from Augustus to Constantine

Emperors of Rome from Augustus to Constantine

When Constantine was at a sufficient distance, the wily old man spread a report
of his death, and placed himself at the head of the troops, who anew proclaimed
him Augustus. Constantine, receiving tidings of this extraordinary treason, ...

Author: Hamilton Gray

Publisher:

ISBN: IBNF:CF000524678

Category:

Page: 593

View: 823

Categories:

Emperors of Rome from Augustus to Constantine being a continuation of the History of Rome

Emperors of Rome from Augustus to Constantine  being a continuation of the History of Rome

When Constantine was at a sufficient distance , the wily old man spread a report
of his death , and placed himself at the head of the troops , who anew proclaimed
him Augustus . Constantine , receiving tidings of this extraordinary treason ...

Author: Elizabeth Caroline Johnstone Gray

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0022396278

Category: Emperors

Page: 593

View: 244

Categories: Emperors

Roman Sculpture from Augustus to Constantine

Roman Sculpture from Augustus to Constantine

CHAPTER XV ROMAN PORTRAITURE FROM AUGUSTUS TO CONSTANTINE
But when Greek art had run its course , when beauty of form had well - nigh been
exhausted or begun to pall , certain artists , presumably Greeks , but working for ...

Author: Eugénie Strong

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015005369288

Category: Sculpture, Greco-Roman

Page: 408

View: 461

Categories: Sculpture, Greco-Roman

The Justice of Constantine

The Justice of Constantine

ued to regard Constantine as Caesar and elevated Licinius to Augustus ahead of
him in 308. Constantine was grudgingly recognized as Augustus in the East only
in 310, after Maximinus Daia usurped the title.82 The balance for these years is ...

Author: John Dillon

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472118298

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 466

An examination of Constantine the Great's legislation and government
Categories: History

Death of Augustus his Conversion to Christ

Death of Augustus his Conversion to Christ

Constantine was by far the eldest son of Constantius, who had a large, much
younger, family with Theodora, daughter of Maximian, the Augustus of the west,
whom he succeeded. Later, after Constantine married Fausta, Crispus, his son by
a ...

Author: Colin Kirk

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781483693347

Category: Religion

Page: 308

View: 300

Myth and the Church Augustus Caesar, Son of God, started the Christiancalendar. Moreover, he also contributed massively to thepersona of Christ, to Christianity and to the ChristianChurch. Indeed, Jesus, a Jewish prophet, was transformedin the process to become the God of Christian Europe. Augustus, the Godfather of Europe, spawned a religion aliento Rome and the world of Rome he had created. This was not the work of Augustus himself. However, Augustus was the luminary of the Roman state religion before he was transformed into the second person of the Trinity. The processes involved in these changes are followedthrough the first four centuries of the Christian era. A brieflook at developments since highlight the Christian church’s continued influence on the western European knowledgebase. Here you can check out your own mindset, against factors that are still crazily influential. The cover illustration is of a restored cult figure of Augustus, one of thousands destroyed by Christian zealots let loose in 395. Most of the hood of the toga of Pontifex Maximus is missing. This example is at Thyatira, to where John sent a copy of his Revelations. All seven churches of the Apocalypse were in the Roman province of Asia. Just off the coast is the island of Samos, where Augustus lived when he was in the area. Patmos, where John wrote his Revelations during his exile there, is a bit further out in the Aegean Sea. The reverse of an Augustan aureus, on the spine, shows the winged victory standing on the globethat Augustus had installed as centerpiece of the Roman Curia. It was carried at his funeral to leadthe procession from the forum to his mausoleum. At the end of the fourth century it was removed from the Curia and reinstated three times. Finally Ambrosius, Bishop of Milan, insisted it be takenout and utterly destroyed. Rome and the world of Rome collapsed shortly afterwards. Augustus’ last 100 days were extremely busy. He was supposedto have suffered from the weariness of old age before then. But after official functions in Rome he went to Capri for a few days, thenon to the Games in Naples, where heindulged in horse play with the athletes and on to Beneventum to review his armies, before they set off to war. His death at the old family home atNola is well documented, down totime and day. It’s the year that’s in dispute here. Christian historians strove to proveJesus was the Messiah by his dateof birth. They also wanted to knowwhen the Second Coming of Christwould occur. In the process they hadto alter the date of Augustus death. Much was destroyed to cover their tracks. Fortunately enough remainsin the debris to reconstruct the real chronology of the period. Surprisingly much else remainedto be unearthed. Cicero, not Herod,ordered the massacre of the innocents. Wise men from the east visited Augustus. It’s all there for the digging.
Categories: Religion

Defending Constantine

Defending Constantine

Galerius was Eastern Augustus, yet ignoring his senior colleague Constantius,
he imposed a policy, and a controversial one, on Western territory.10 Without the
original chief Augustus, Diocletian, the Tetrarchy began to fracture. constantine's
 ...

Author: Peter J. Leithart

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 9780830827220

Category: Religion

Page: 373

View: 890

Peter Leithart weighs what we've been taught about Constantine and claims that in focusing on these historical mirages we have failed to notice the true significance of Constantine and Rome baptized. He reveals how beneath the surface of this contested story there lies a deeper narrative--a tectonic shift in the political theology of an empire--with far-reaching implications.
Categories: Religion

The Emperor Constantine

The Emperor Constantine

Michael Grant. Constantine left Galerius' eastern domains and went to his father
Constantius I Chlorus in the west. ... conceded him the rank of Caesar – granting
Severus, however, the superior position in the west, as his own fellow Augustus.

Author: Michael Grant

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781780222806

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 497

A study of one of the ancient world's most fascinating figures. Fascinating and readable biography by a great populariser of classical civilisation. Directly responsible for momentous transformations of the Imperial scene, Constantine will always be famous as the 1st Christian Emperor of Rome, and for refounding ancient Byzantium as Constantinople - events which rank amongst the most significant in history. In art, politics, economics and particularly in religion, the life of Constantine acts as a bridge between past and present. Was he the last notable Roman Emperor, or the first medieval monarch ? Was the Great convert a saint and hero, or should we regard him as a murderer who killed his wife, his eldest son , and many of his friends to further his own ambitions? These are just some of the issues that are raised in this stimulating biography.
Categories: History

Opuscula Romana

Opuscula Romana

When he appeared , on folles of reduced weight from Trier and Lyons , it was as
augustus . " In Italy and Africa , Maxentius appeared as augustus on unreduced
bronze from Aquileia and Carthage , with Constantine as caesar and Maximianus
 ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X002132254

Category: Rome

Page:

View: 353

Categories: Rome

The Life and Times of Constantine the Great

The Life and Times of Constantine the Great

Constantine , who apparently had in those days a playful sense of humor and the
ability to separate in his mind the essential from the trivial , accepted with
equanimity his demotion to Caesar again . In his own mind , he was the Augustus
 ...

Author: Dimitrios George Kousoulas

Publisher: Netsource Dist Services

ISBN: STANFORD:36105111376559

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 511

View: 184

Appendices include: The Administrative subdivision of the Roman Empire and Coins from the Constantine period.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Age of Constantine and Julian

The Age of Constantine and Julian

As for the vacant position of junior Augustus left by the death of Severus , rather
than promote Constantine , who remained Caesar of Gaul and Britain , Galerius
chose another old comrade - in - arms , Licinius , assigning to him the middle ...

Author: Diana Bowder

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015034647126

Category: Art, Roman

Page: 230

View: 855

Categories: Art, Roman

Constantine and the Conversion of Europe

Constantine and the Conversion of Europe

Galerius was furious at the usurpation , but he thought it best to accept the fait
accompli and proclaimed Constantine , not as Augustus , but as Cæsar ; Severus
, the senior Cæsar , was at the same time proclaimed junior Augustus .

Author: Arnold Hugh Martin Jones

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X030267055

Category: Church history

Page: 223

View: 417

Categories: Church history