Astrobiological Neurosystems

Astrobiological Neurosystems

This book explains why scientists believe that life may be more common in the Universe than previously considered possible.

Author: Jerry L. Cranford

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319104195

Category: Science

Page: 204

View: 507

This book explains why scientists believe that life may be more common in the Universe than previously considered possible. It presents the tools and strategies astronomers and astrobiologists are using in their formal search for habitable exoplanets as well as more advanced forms of life in other parts of our galaxy. The author then summarizes what is currently known about how and where organic molecules critical to our form of carbon-based life are manufactured. The core of the book explains (and presents educated guesses) how nervous systems evolved on Earth, how they work, and how they might work on other worlds. Combining his knowledge of neuroscience, computers, and astrobiology the author jumps into the discussion whether biological nervous systems are just the first step in the rise of intelligence in the Universe. The book ends with a description from both the psychologist’s and the neuroscientist’s viewpoints, exactly what it is about the fields of astrobiology and astronomy that “boggles the minds” of many amateur astronomers and interested non-scientists. This book stands out from other popular science books on astrobiology by making the point that “astro-neurobiologists” need to begin thinking about how alien nervous systems might work.
Categories: Science

Spinal Catastrophism

Spinal Catastrophism

See J.L. Cranford, Astrobiological Neurosystems: Rise and Fall of Intelligent Life Forms in the Universe (New York: ... 'Alien Mindscapes—A Perspective on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence', Astrobiology 16:9 (2016), 661–76.

Author: Thomas Moynihan

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9781913029630

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 401

The historical continuity of spinal catastrophism, traced across multiform encounters between philosophy, psychology, biology, and geology. Drawing on cryptic intimations in the work of J. G. Ballard, Georges Bataille, William Burroughs, André Leroi-Gourhan, Elaine Morgan, and Friedrich Nietzsche, in the late twentieth century Daniel Barker formulated the axioms of spinal catastrophism: If human morphology, upright posture, and the possibility of language are the ramified accidents of natural history, then psychic ailments are ultimately afflictions of the spine, which itself is a scale model of biogenetic trauma, a portable map of the catastrophic events that shaped that atrocity exhibition of evolutionary traumata, the sick orthograde talking mammal. Tracing its provenance through the biological notions of phylogeny and “organic memory” that fueled early psychoanalysis, back into idealism, nature philosophy, and romanticism, and across multiform encounters between philosophy, psychology, biology, and geology, Thomas Moynihan reveals the historical continuity of spinal catastrophism. From psychoanalysis and myth to geology and neuroanatomy, from bioanalysis to chronopathy, from spinal colonies of proto-minds to the retroparasitism of the CNS, from “railway spine” to Elizabeth Taylor's lost gill-slits, this extravagantly comprehensive philosophical adventure uses the spinal cord as a guiding thread to rediscover forgotten pathways in modern thought. Moynihan demonstrates that, far from being an fanciful notion rendered obsolete by advances in biology, spinal catastrophism dramatizes fundamental philosophical problematics of time, identity, continuity, and the transcendental that remain central to any attempt to reconcile human experience with natural history.
Categories: Philosophy

The Great Silence

The Great Silence

Cranford, J. L. 2015, Astrobiological Neurosystems: Rise and Fall of Intelligent Life Forms in the Universe (Springer, New York). Crawford, I. A. 1993, 'Space, World Government, and “The End of History” ', J. Brit. Interplanet. Soc.

Author: Milan M. Ćirković

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199646302

Category: Fermi's paradox

Page: 395

View: 258

Researchers believe that the universe is vast enough that life has evolved and become technological many times, - yet we have seen no trace of extraterrestrial intelligence. This conundrum, known as the Fermi pardox, is the deepest mystery in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Put simply, where is everybody?
Categories: Fermi's paradox

Artificial Neural Networks and Machine Learning ICANN 2021

Artificial Neural Networks and Machine Learning     ICANN 2021

Cranford, J.L.: Astrobiological Neurosystems: Rise and Fall of Intelligent Life Forms in the Universe. ... Fagerholm, E.D., Friston, K.J., Moran, R.J., Leech, R.: The principle of stationary action in neural systems. arXiv p.

Author: Igor Farkaš

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030863807

Category: Computers

Page: 703

View: 375

The proceedings set LNCS 12891, LNCS 12892, LNCS 12893, LNCS 12894 and LNCS 12895 constitute the proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, ICANN 2021, held in Bratislava, Slovakia, in September 2021.* The total of 265 full papers presented in these proceedings was carefully reviewed and selected from 496 submissions, and organized in 5 volumes. In this volume, the papers focus on topics such as model compression, multi-task and multi-label learning, neural network theory, normalization and regularization methods, person re-identification, recurrent neural networks, and reinforcement learning. *The conference was held online 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Categories: Computers

Astrobiology of Earth

Astrobiology of Earth

some algae, through environment-sensing higher-plant organs, to neural systems in insects and animals, to the human brain. Life forms sometimes move in patterns that serve their function. Again the range • of possible movements is very ...

Author: Joseph Gale

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191548352

Category: Science

Page:

View: 366

The study of life in our universe has been given the name 'astrobiology'. It is a relatively new subject, but not a new discipline since it brings together several mature fields of science including astronomy, geology, biology, and climatology. An understanding of the singular conditions that allowed the only example of life that we know exists to emerge and survive on our turbulent planet is essential if we are to seek answers to two fundamental questions facing humanity: will life (and especially human life) continue on Earth, and does life exist elsewhere in the universe? Astrobiology of Earth adopts a unique approach that differs from most texts in the field which focus on the possibility of extraterrestrial life. In contrast, the central theme of this book is the fortuitous combination of numerous cosmic factors that together produced the special environment which enabled the emergence, persistence and evolution of life on our own planet, culminating in humanity. This environment has been subject to constant and chaotic change during life's 3.6 billion year history. The geologically very recent appearance of humans and their effect on the biosphere is discussed in relation to its deterioration as well as climate change. The search for extraterrestrial life is considered with a view to the suggestion that humans may escape a depleted Earth by colonizing the universe. This book contributes to our understanding of astrobiology from the perspective of life on Earth and especially human welfare and survival. Astronomical and geological phenomena are related in turn to their biological relevance and impact. This introductory text assumes little or no prior knowledge of more specialized scientific fields and is designed for undergraduate and graduate level students taking related courses in departments of biology, earth science/geology, and environmental science. It will also serve as a useful biology primer for astronomy majors.
Categories: Science

Astrobiology Discovery and Societal Impact

Astrobiology  Discovery  and Societal Impact

Those creatures totally lacking the sociality-reason-culture triad include “microbes, plants and lower animals with only rudimentary neural systems” – likely to be most of the creatures in the universe. He therefore lumps humans in with ...

Author: Steven J. Dick

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108652919

Category: Science

Page:

View: 974

The search for life in the universe, once the stuff of science fiction, is now a robust worldwide research program with a well-defined roadmap probing both scientific and societal issues. This volume examines the humanistic aspects of astrobiology, systematically discussing the approaches, critical issues, and implications of discovering life beyond Earth. What do the concepts of life and intelligence, culture and civilization, technology and communication mean in a cosmic context? What are the theological and philosophical implications if we find life - and if we do not? Steven J. Dick argues that given recent scientific findings, the discovery of life in some form beyond Earth is likely and so we need to study the possible impacts of such a discovery and formulate policies to deal with them. The remarkable and often surprising results are presented here in a form accessible to disciplines across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Categories: Science

The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance

The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance

Evan D. Dorn received his PhD in computation and neural systems from the California Institute of Technology in 2005, performing original research in astrobiology, artificial life, and the mathematics of chemical evolution.

Author: Vida L. Midgelow

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199397006

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 800

View: 553

From the dance floor of a tango club to group therapy classes, from ballet to community theatre, improvised dance is everywhere. For some dance artists, improvisation is one of many approaches within the choreographic process. For others, it is a performance form in its own right. And while it has long been practiced, it is only within the last twenty years that dance improvisation has become a topic of critical inquiry. With The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance, dancer, teacher, and editor Vida L. Midgelow provides a cutting-edge volume on dance improvisation in all its facets. Expanding beyond conventional dance frameworks, this handbook looks at the ways that dance improvisation practices reflect our ability to adapt, communicate, and respond to our environment. Throughout the handbook, case studies from a variety of disciplines showcase the role of individual agency and collective relationships in improvisation, not just to dancers but to people of all backgrounds and abilities. In doing so, chapters celebrate all forms of improvisation, and unravel the ways that this kind of movement informs understandings of history, socio-cultural conditions, lived experience, cognition, and technologies.
Categories: Performing Arts

From Matter to Life

From Matter to Life

Her previous appointments include a NASA postdoctoral program fellowship with the NASA Astrobiology Institute and a ... active information storage in neural systems. david wolpert is the author of three books and more than 200 papers, ...

Author: Sara Imari Walker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108116503

Category: Science

Page:

View: 596

Recent advances suggest that the concept of information might hold the key to unravelling the mystery of life's nature and origin. Fresh insights from a broad and authoritative range of articulate and respected experts focus on the transition from matter to life, and hence reconcile the deep conceptual schism between the way we describe physical and biological systems. A unique cross-disciplinary perspective, drawing on expertise from philosophy, biology, chemistry, physics, and cognitive and social sciences, provides a new way to look at the deepest questions of our existence. This book addresses the role of information in life, and how it can make a difference to what we know about the world. Students, researchers, and all those interested in what life is and how it began will gain insights into the nature of life and its origins that touch on nearly every domain of science.
Categories: Science

Artificial You

Artificial You

... Dynamical Modeling of Human Hippocampus for Memory Prostheses,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering ... “Bayesian Analysis of the Astrobiological Implications of Life's Early Emergence on Earth,” ...

Author: Susan Schneider

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691216744

Category: Computers

Page: 192

View: 316

A guide to AI’s thorniest implications that asks: How shall we navigate our brave new world? We are at a monumental turning point in human history. AI is taking intelligence in new directions. The strongest human competitors in chess, go, and Jeopardy! have been beaten by AIs, and AI is getting more sophisticated by the day. Further, AI research is going inside the human brain itself, attempting to augment human minds. It may even create greater-than-human-level intelligence, leading to a new generation of artificial minds—Minds 2.0. Susan Schneider, a philosopher, argues that these undertakings must not be attempted without a richer understanding of the nature of the mind. An insufficient grasp of the underlying philosophical issues could undermine the use of AI and brain enhancement technology, bringing about the demise or suffering of conscious beings. Examining the philosophical questions lying beneath the algorithms, Schneider takes on AI’s thorniest implications.
Categories: Computers

The Evolutionary Biology of Extinct and Extant Organisms

The Evolutionary Biology of Extinct and Extant Organisms

Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores. J. Exp. Biol. 218 (4), 598e611. ... Astrobiology. United States 13 (4), 391e403. https://doi.org/10.1089/ast.2012.0868. Newell, G.E., 1952. The homology of the stomochord of the ...

Author: Subir Ranjan Kundu

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780128232835

Category: Science

Page: 266

View: 895

The Evolutionary Biology of Extinct and Extant Organisms offers a thorough and detailed narration of the journey of biological evolution and its major transitional links to the biological world, which began with paleontological exploration of extinct organisms and now carries on with reviews of phylogenomic footprint reviews of extant, living fossils. This book moves through the defining evolutionary stepping stones starting with the evolutionary changes in prokaryotic, aquatic organisms over 4 billion years ago to the emergence of the modern human species in Earth’s Anthropocene. The book begins with an overview of the processes of evolutionary fitness, the epicenter of the principles of evolutionary biology. Whether through natural or experimental occurrence, evolutionary fitness has been found to be the cardinal instance of evolutionary links in an organism between its ancestral and contemporary states. The book then goes on to detail evolutionary trails and lineages of groups of organisms including mammalians, reptilians, and various fish. The final section of the book provides a look back at the evolutionary journey of "nonliving" or extinct organisms, versus the modern-day transition to "living" or extant organisms. The Evolutionary Biology of Extinct and Extant Organisms is the ideal resource for any researcher or advanced student in evolutionary studies, ranging from evolutionary biology to general life sciences. Provides an updated compendium of evolution research history Details the evolution trails of organisms, including mammals, reptiles, arthropods, annelids, mollusks, protozoa, and more Offers an accessible and easy-to-read presentation of complex, in-depth evolutionary biology facts and theories
Categories: Science