Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete

Amid rising public concern about the proliferation and privatization of prisons, and their promise of enormous profits, world-renowned author and activist Angela Davis argues for the abolition of the prison system as the dominant way of ...

Author: Angela Yvonne Davis

Publisher:

ISBN: 1583225811

Category: Political Science

Page: 128

View: 321

Since the 1980s prison construction and incarceration rates in the U.S. have been rising exponentially, evoking huge public concern about their proliferation, their recent privatisation and their promise of enormous profits. But these prisons house hugely disproportionate numbers of people of colour, betraying the racism embedded in the system, while studies show that increasing prison sentences has had no effect on crime. Here, esteemed civil rights activist Angela Davis lays bare the situation and argues for a radical rethinking of our rehabilitation programmes.
Categories: Political Science

Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete

With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life; the abolition of the prison.

Author: Angela Y. Davis

Publisher:

ISBN: 1458786420

Category:

Page: 180

View: 564

With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life; the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly, the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable
Categories:

Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete

California prisons. In less than a single decade, the number of California prisons doubled. And during the 1990s, twelve new prisons were opened, including two more for women. In 1995 the Valley State Prison for Women was opened.

Author: Angela Y. Davis

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 9781609801045

Category: Political Science

Page: 128

View: 617

With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable. In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for "decarceration", and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole.
Categories: Political Science

Quicklet on Angela Y Davis s Are Prisons Obsolete

Quicklet on Angela Y  Davis s Are Prisons Obsolete

Dr. Angela Y. Davis' Are Prisons Obsolete? is a formative work about prison abolition. She explores and critiques the American penal system. The work is especially significant as the prison system continues to grow.

Author: Nicole Bemboom

Publisher: Hyperink Inc

ISBN: 9781614641117

Category: Study Aids

Page: 24

View: 521

ABOUT THE BOOK Dr. Angela Y. Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete? is a formative work about prison abolition. She explores and critiques the American penal system. The work is especially significant as the prison system continues to grow. She does not call for prison reform—although conditions will need to be ameliorated during decarceration—but for the eradication of prisons and their replacement with positive systems, such as schools, job training, health care and recreation programs. People have an extremely hard time imagining the world without prisons. We think that they are an inherent and unavoidable part of society. Davis examines the historical, social, racial, economic and political reasons and context that created the prison system, in order to "encourage readers to question their own assumptions about the prison" (Angela Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? pg 10). Davis hopes that once these elements have been exposed it will be possible to "give up our usual way of thinking about punishment as an inevitable consequence of crime" (Davis 112) and imagine a world without prisons. MEET THE AUTHOR Nicole Bemboom is a San Francisco based writer. In addition to writing for the exciting new publisher Hyperink, she covers the best of modern craft and design for the online magazine Handful of Salt. She received her BA in Modern Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK In the chapter "Slavery, Civic Rights, and Abolitionist Perspectives Toward Prison," Davis examines the history of modern prisons, which started developing out of a reform of the corporeal punishment common in England during the American Revolution. Reformers believed that punishment “if carried out in isolation, behind the walls of the prison—would cease to be revenge and would actually reform those who had broken the law” (Davis 41). While this was meant to help people, it ended up growing into a situation in which prisoners were kept in unbearable silence and isolated cells, except while they did hard labor. Davis also shows how prisons took over the institution of slavery, which follows in more detail in the essay “Race and the Prison Sytem.” Davis examines the role of gender in the chapter “How Gender Structures the Prison System.” She finds the prisons reflect the gender structure in society, although she is careful to point out that defining women’s prisons as marginal helps to reinforce the assumption that male prisons are normal. She also details the terror and sexual abuse that is routine in prisons. Buy a copy to keep reading!
Categories: Study Aids

Abolition Democracy

Abolition Democracy

Discussing the most recent disclosures about the disavowed "chain of command," and the formal reports by the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch denouncing U.S. violation of human rights and the laws of war in Guantánamo, Afghanistan and Iraq ...

Author: Angela Y. Davis

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 1609801032

Category: Political Science

Page: 128

View: 996

Revelations about U.S policies and practices of torture and abuse have captured headlines ever since the breaking of the Abu Ghraib prison story in April 2004. Since then, a debate has raged regarding what is and what is not acceptable behavior for the world’s leading democracy. It is within this context that Angela Davis, one of America’s most remarkable political figures, gave a series of interviews to discuss resistance and law, institutional sexual coercion, politics and prison. Davis talks about her own incarceration, as well as her experiences as "enemy of the state," and about having been put on the FBI’s "most wanted" list. She talks about the crucial role that international activism played in her case and the case of many other political prisoners. Throughout these interviews, Davis returns to her critique of a democracy that has been compromised by its racist origins and institutions. Discussing the most recent disclosures about the disavowed "chain of command," and the formal reports by the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch denouncing U.S. violation of human rights and the laws of war in Guantánamo, Afghanistan and Iraq, Davis focuses on the underpinnings of prison regimes in the United States.
Categories: Political Science

Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete

Author: Angela Yvonne Davis

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1011721478

Category: Alternatives to imprisonment

Page:

View: 855

Categories: Alternatives to imprisonment

The Return of the Lazarus Generation

The Return of the Lazarus Generation

The subtitle of this chapter is taken directly from the title of Angela Davis' 2003 book, Are Prisons Obsolete?. In light of that fact, I probably need to begin with the disclaimer that I love (I am an adoring fan of) Angela Davis.

Author: Michael E. Evans

Publisher: Armour of Light Publishing

ISBN: 9780981712000

Category: Criminals

Page: 256

View: 824

Categories: Criminals

Angela Davis

Angela Davis

Featuring a new introduction by the author, Angela Davis: An Autobiography is a classic account of a life in struggle.

Author: Angela Y. Davis

Publisher:

ISBN: 1642595683

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 420

View: 157

Featuring a new introduction by the author, Angela Davis: An Autobiography is a classic account of a life in struggle.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Good Punishment

Good Punishment

Christian Moral Practice and U.S. Imprisonment James Samuel Logan ... concern in any case, but especially when it is tied together with the exploitation of prison labor by private corporations. ... Angela Y. Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete?

Author: James Samuel Logan

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802863249

Category: Religion

Page: 261

View: 457

The author critiques the American obsession with imprisonment as punishment, calling it "retributive degradation" of the incarcerated. His analysis draws on both salient empirical data and material from a variety of disciplines - social history, anthropology, law and penal theory, philosophy of religion - as he uncovers the devastating social consequences (both direct and collateral) of imprisonment on such a large, unprecedented scale. The book develops a Christian social ethics of "good punishment" embodied as a politics of "healing memories" and "ontological intimacy"
Categories: Religion

Reading Is My Window

Reading Is My Window

Books and the Art of Reading in Women's Prisons Megan Sweeney. on state-owned prison plantations. ... were viewed as having violated fundamental principles of womanhood; see Rafter, Partial Justice, 13; Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete?, 70.

Author: Megan Sweeney

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080789835X

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 315

Drawing on extensive interviews with ninety-four women prisoners, Megan Sweeney examines how incarcerated women use available reading materials to come to terms with their pasts, negotiate their present experiences, and reach toward different futures. Foregrounding the voices of African American women, Sweeney analyzes how prisoners read three popular genres: narratives of victimization, urban crime fiction, and self-help books. She outlines the history of reading and education in U.S. prisons, highlighting how the increasing dehumanization of prisoners has resulted in diminished prison libraries and restricted opportunities for reading. Although penal officials have sometimes endorsed reading as a means to control prisoners, Sweeney illuminates the resourceful ways in which prisoners educate and empower themselves through reading. Given the scarcity of counseling and education in prisons, women use books to make meaning from their experiences, to gain guidance and support, to experiment with new ways of being, and to maintain connections with the world.
Categories: Social Science