Archaeology of the Mid-Holocene Southeast

Author: Kenneth E. Sassaman,David G. Anderson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813018553

Category: Social Science

Page: 412

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This volume summarizes our archeological knowledge of natives who inhabited the American Southeast from 8,000 to 3,000 years ago and examines evidence of many of the native cultural expressions observed by early European explorers, including long-distance exchange, plant domestication, mound building, social ranking, and warfare. (Archaeology/Anthropology)
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Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

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TVA Archaeology

Seventy-five Years of Prehistoric Site Research

Author: Erin E. Pritchard

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 1572336501

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8531

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Since its inception in 1933, the Tennessee Valley Authority has played a dual role as federal agency and steward of the Tennessee River Valley. While known to most people today as an energy provider, the agency is also charged with managing and protecting the nation's fifth-largest river system, the Tennessee River, and vast tracts of land and resources encompassing Tennessee and portions of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Virginia. Included in TVA's mandate is the preservation of the archaeological record of the valley's prehistoric peoples-a record that would have been forever lost beneath floodwaters had TVA not demonstrated a commitment to minimize its impact on the valley and sought to protect its archaeological resources. In TVA Archaeology, fourteen contributors who have worked with TVA in its conservation effort discuss prehistoric excavations conducted at Tellico, Normandy, Jonathan's Creek, and many other sites. They explore TVA's role in the excavations and how the agency facilitated prehistoric investigations along proposed dam sites. They also delve into the history of TVA as it grew from a New Deal program to a federal corporation and reveal how, during the agency's formative years, the TVA board responded to prodding from archaeologists David DeJarnette and William Webb and molded TVA into the steward of a region it is today. TVA remains a mainstay of progress and conservation within an important region of the United States, and its safeguarding of the valley's prehistory cements its legacy as more than just an energy supplier. Students and researchers interested in prehistoric archaeology, the Tennessee Valley, and the history of TVA will find this volume an invaluable contribution to the study of the region. Erin E. Pritchard is an archaeologist with the Tennessee Valley Authority. Her work includes multiple archaeological site investigations, most notably Dust Cave in northern Alabama, and she has authored and coauthored numerous site reports for TVA.
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Archaic Societies

Diversity and Complexity across the Midcontinent

Author: Thomas E. Emerson,Dale L. McElrath,Andrew C. Fortier

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 143842700X

Category: Social Science

Page: 891

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Essential overview of American Indian societies during the Archaic period across central North America.
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The Woodland Southeast

Author: David G. Anderson,Robert C. Mainfort

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817311378

Category: History

Page: 680

View: 9460

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This collection presents, for the first time, a much-needed synthesis of the major research themes and findings that characterize the Woodland Period in the southeastern United States. The Woodland Period (ca. 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1000) has been the subject of a great deal of archaeological research over the past 25 years. Researchers have learned that in this approximately 2000-year era the peoples of the Southeast experienced increasing sedentism, population growth, and organizational complexity. At the beginning of the period, people are assumed to have been living in small groups, loosely bound by collective burial rituals. But by the first millennium A.D., some parts of the region had densely packed civic ceremonial centers ruled by hereditary elites. Maize was now the primary food crop. Perhaps most importantly, the ancient animal-focused and hunting-based religion and cosmology were being replaced by solar and warfare iconography, consistent with societies dependent on agriculture, and whose elites were increasingly in competition with one another. This volume synthesizes the research on what happened during this era and how these changes came about while analyzing the period's archaeological record. In gathering the latest research available on the Woodland Period, the editors have included contributions from the full range of specialists working in the field, highlighted major themes, and directed readers to the proper primary sources. Of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists, both professional and amateur, this will be a valuable reference work essential to understanding the Woodland Period in the Southeast.
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An Archaeology of Black Markets

Local Ceramics and Economies in Eighteenth-century Jamaica

Author: Mark W. Hauser

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 9391

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In eighteenth-century Jamaica, an informal, underground economy existed among enslaved laborers. Mark Hauser uses pottery fragments to examine their trade networks and to understand how enslaved and free Jamaicans created communities that transcended plantation boundaries. An Archaeology of Black Markets utilizes both documentary and archaeological evidence to reveal how slaves practiced their own systematic forms of economic production, exchange, and consumption. Hauser compares the findings from a number of previously excavated sites and presents new analyses that reinterpret these collections in the context of island-wide trading networks. Trading allowed enslaved laborers to cross boundaries of slave life and enter into a black market of economic practices with pots in hand. By utilizing secret trails that connected plantations, sectarian churches, and these street markets, the enslaved remained in contact, exchanged information, news, and gossip, and ultimately stoked the colony's 1831 rebellion. Hauser considers how uprooted peoples from Africa created new networks in Jamaica, and interjects into archaeological discussions the importance of informal economic practice among non-elite members of society.
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Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14: Southeast

Author: Raymond Fogelson,William Sturtevant

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 9780160723001

Category: History

Page: 1058

View: 8976

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The Smithsonian Institution’s Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14, Southeast The Southeast Indians were sophisticated farmers, hunters, gatherers, and fishers occupying a diverse region extending from the Blue Ridge Mountains of the Southern Appalachians, the Carolina Piedmont, the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains, Florida, and west of the mountains to the rich valley of the southern Mississippi River. The complexity and uniqueness of the Southeast culture area is detailed in The Smithsonian Institution’s Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 14, Southeast. Its 64 chapters, written by 63 leading authorities, both anthropologists and historians, describe and illustrate the culture of each major tribe and tribal group, their history, transformation, and evolution over time. Regional and sub-regional overviews frame these and summarize the long prehistory of the area. Special topic chapters examine broad aspects of culture that characterize the Southeast and cross tribal lines. Introductory chapters explore the history of research in the area, languages spoken, and environment, and synthesize information on many small groups inadequately described in the historical literature. 508 illustrations--maps, drawings, paintings, engravings, photographs. Essays on sources, extensive bibliography, detailed index.
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Diversity and Complexity in Prehistoric Maritime Societies

A Gulf Of Maine Perspective

Author: Bruce J. Bourque

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780585275741

Category: Social Science

Page: 414

View: 3299

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New England archaeology has not always been everyone's cup of tea; only late in the Golden of nineteenth-century archaeology, as archaeology's focus turned westward, did a few pioneers look northward as well, causing a brief flurry of investigation and excavation. Between 1892 and 1894, Charles C. Willoughby did some exemplary excavations at three small burial sites in Bucksport, Orland, and Ellsworth, Maine, and made some models of that activity for exhibition at the Chicago World's Fair. These activities were encouraged by E Putnam, director of the Harvard Peabody Museum and head of anthropology at the "Columbian" Exposition. Even earlier, another director of the Peabody, Jeffries Wyman, spawned some real interest in the shellheaps of the Maine coast, but that did not last very long. Twentieth-century New England archaeology, specifically in Maine, was--for its first fifty years--rather low key too, with short-lived but important activity by Arlo and Oric (a Bates Harvard student) prior to World War Later, I. another Massachusetts institution, the Peabody Foundation at Andover, took some minor but responsible steps toward further understanding of the area's prehistoric past.
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Knife and hammer

an exercise in positive deconstruction : the I-75 project and lithic scatter research in Florida

Author: Robert J. Austin,Florida Anthropological Society

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 221

View: 6565

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