Archaeology of Oceania

Australia and the Pacific Islands

Author: Ian Lilley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 140515229X

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 7412

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book is a state-of-the-art introduction to the archaeology of Oceania, covering both Australia and the Pacific Islands. The first text to provide integrated treatment of the archaeologies of Australia and the Pacific Islands Enables readers to form a coherent overview of cultural developments across the region as a whole Brings together contributions from some of the region’s leading scholars Focuses on new discoveries, conceptual innovations, and postcolonial realpolitik Challenges conventional thinking on major regional and global issues in archaeology
Release

Temper Sands in Prehistoric Oceanian Pottery

Geotectonics, Sedimentology, Petrography, Provenance

Author: William R. Dickinson

Publisher: Geological Society of America

ISBN: 0813724066

Category: Science

Page: 164

View: 8779

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"Oceanian ceramic cultures making earthenware pottery spread during the past 3500 years through a dozen major island groups spanning 6000 km of the tropical Pacific Ocean from western Micronesia to western Polynesia. Island potters mixed sand as temper into clay bodies during ceramic manufacture. The nature of island sands is governed by the geotectonics of hotspot chains, island arcs, subduction zones, backarc basins, and remnant arcs as well as by sedimentology. Because small islands with bedrock exposures of restricted character are virtual point sources of sand, many tempers are diagnostic of specific islands. Petrographic study of temper sands in thin section allows distinction between indigenous pottery and exotic pottery transported from elsewhere. Study of 2223 prehistoric Oceanian potsherds from 130 islands and island clusters indicates the nature of Oceanian temper types and documents 105 cases of interisland transport of ceramics over distances typically
Release

The Oxford Handbook of Prehistoric Oceania

Author: Terry L. Hunt,Ethan E. Cochrane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190875658

Category: Social Science

Page: 720

View: 5212

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Oceania was the last region on earth to be permanently inhabited, with the final settlers reaching Aotearoa/New Zealand approximately AD 1300. This is about the same time that related Polynesian populations began erecting Easter Island's gigantic statues, farming the valley slopes of Tahiti and similar islands, and moving finely made basalt tools over several thousand kilometers of open ocean between Hawai'i, the Marquesas, the Cook Islands, and archipelagos in between. The remarkable prehistory of Polynesia is one chapter of Oceania's human story. Almost 50,000 years prior, people entered Oceania for the first time, arriving in New Guinea and its northern offshore islands shortly thereafter, a biogeographic region labelled Near Oceania and including parts of Melanesia. Near Oceania saw the independent development of agriculture and has a complex history resulting in the greatest linguistic diversity in the world. Beginning 1000 BC, after millennia of gradually accelerating cultural change in Near Oceania, some groups sailed east from this space of inter-visible islands and entered Remote Oceania, rapidly colonizing the widely separated separated archipelagos from Vanuatu to S?moa with purposeful, return voyages, and carrying an intricately decorated pottery called Lapita. From this common cultural foundation these populations developed separate, but occasionally connected, cultural traditions over the next 3000 years. Western Micronesia, the archipelagos of Palau, Guam and the Marianas, was also colonized around 1500 BC by canoes arriving from the west, beginning equally long sequences of increasingly complex social formations, exchange relationships and monumental constructions. All of these topics and others are presented in The Oxford Handbook of Prehistoric Oceania written by Oceania's leading archaeologists and allied researchers. Chapters describe the cultural sequences of the region's major island groups, provide the most recent explanations for diversity and change in Oceanic prehistory, and lay the foundation for the next generation of research.
Release

The Archaeology of Difference

Negotiating Cross-Cultural Engagements in Oceania

Author: Anne Clarke,Robin Torrence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113482842X

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 1258

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The Archaeology of Difference presents a new and radically different perspective on the archaeology of cross-cultural contact and engagement. The authors move away from acculturation or domination and resistance and concentrate on interaction and negotiation by using a wide variety of case studies which take a crucially indigenous rather than colonial standpoint.
Release

The Global Prehistory of Human Migration

Author: Immanuel Ness

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118970586

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7334

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Previously published as the first volume of The Encyclopediaof Global Human Migration, this work is devoted exclusively toprehistoric migration, covering all periods and places from thefirst hominin migrations out of Africa through the end ofprehistory. Presents interdisciplinary coverage of this topic, includingscholarship from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, genetics,biology, linguistics, and more Includes contributions from a diverse international team ofauthors, representing 17 countries and a variety ofdisciplines Divided into two sections, covering the Pleistocene andHolocene; each section examines human migration through chaptersthat focus on different regional and disciplinary lenses
Release

The Archaeology of Lapita Dispersal in Oceania

Papers from the Fourth Lapita Conference, June 2000, Canberra, Australia

Author: Geoffrey Richard Clark,Atholl Anderson,Tarisi Vunidilo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Archaeology

Page: 223

View: 1834

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Papers from the Fourth Lapita Conference held in Canberra. Lapita archaeology is of fundamental importance to understanding the Pacific since it unearths information about the first people to establish themselves beyond the Solomon Islands to as far east as Samoa around 3000 years ago.
Release

Archaeology in Practice

A Student Guide to Archaeological Analyses

Author: Jane Balme,Alistair Paterson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405148861

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 4244

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Archaeology in Practice: A Student Guide to ArchaeologicalAnalyses offers students in archaeology laboratory courses adetailed and invaluable how-to manual of archaeological methods andprovides insight into the breadth of modern archaeology. Written by specialists of material analyses, whose expertiserepresents a broad geographic range Includes numerous examples of applications of archaeologicaltechniques Organized by material types, such as animal bones, ceramics,stone artifacts, and documentary sources, or by themes, such asdating, ethics, and report writing Written accessibly and amply referenced to provide readers witha guide to further resources on techniques and theirapplications Enlivened by a range of boxed case studies throughout the maintext
Release

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191650390

Category: Social Science

Page: 872

View: 1508

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.
Release

The Cultural Life of Images

Visual Representation in Archaeology

Author: Brian Leigh Molyneaux

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134546300

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 7733

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Pictures are often admired for their aesthetic merits but they are rarely treated as if they had as much to offer as the written word. They are often overlooked as objects of analysis themselves, and tend to be seen simply as adjuncts to the text. Images, however, are not passive, and have a direct impact that engages attention in ways independent of any specific text. Advertising, entertainment and propaganda have realised the extent of this power to shape ideas, but the scientific community has hitherto neglected the ways in which visual material conditions the ways in which we think. With subjects including prehistoric artworks, excavation illustrations, artists' impressions of ancient sites and peoples and contemporary landscapes, photographs and drawings, this study explores how pictures shape our perceptions and our expectations of the past. This volume is not concerned with the accuracy of pictures from the past or directly about the past itself, but is interested instead in why certain subjects are selected, why they are depicted the way they are, and what effects such images have on our idea of the past. This collection constitutes a ground-breaking study in historiography which radically reassesses the ways that history can be written.
Release