The Roots of Rough Justice

The Roots of Rough Justice

His trenchant and concise analysis anchors the first book to consider the crucial emergence of the practice of lynching of slaves in antebellum America.

Author: Michael J. Pfeifer

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252093098

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 129

In this deeply researched prequel to his 2006 study Rough Justice: Lynching and American Society, 1874–1947, Michael J. Pfeifer analyzes the foundations of lynching in American social history. Scrutinizing the vigilante movements and lynching violence that occurred in the middle decades of the nineteenth century on the Southern, Midwestern, and far Western frontiers, The Roots of Rough Justice: Origins of American Lynching offers new insights into collective violence in the pre-Civil War era. Pfeifer examines the antecedents of American lynching in an early modern Anglo-European folk and legal heritage. He addresses the transformation of ideas and practices of social ordering, law, and collective violence in the American colonies, the early American Republic, and especially the decades before and immediately after the American Civil War. His trenchant and concise analysis anchors the first book to consider the crucial emergence of the practice of lynching of slaves in antebellum America. Pfeifer also leads the way in analyzing the history of American lynching in a global context, from the early modern British Atlantic to the legal status of collective violence in contemporary Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. Seamlessly melding source material with apt historical examples, The Roots of Rough Justice tackles the emergence of not only the rhetoric surrounding lynching, but its practice and ideology. Arguing that the origins of lynching cannot be restricted to any particular region, Pfeifer shows how the national and transatlantic context is essential for understanding how whites used mob violence to enforce the racial and class hierarchies across the United States.
Categories: History

American Lynching

American Lynching

This book should be the point of entry for anyone interested in the tragic and sordid history of American lynching.” —W.

Author: Ashraf H. A. Rushdy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300184747

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 781

A history of lynching in America over the course of three centuries, from colonial Virginia to twentieth-century Texas. After observing the varying reactions to the 1998 death of James Byrd Jr. in Texas, called a lynching by some, denied by others, Ashraf Rushdy determined that to comprehend this event he needed to understand the long history of lynching in the United States. In this meticulously researched and accessibly written interpretive history, Rushdy shows how lynching in America has endured, evolved, and changed in meaning over the course of three centuries, from its origins in early Virginia to the present day. “A work of uncommon breadth, written with equally uncommon concision. Excellent.” —N. D. B. Connolly, Johns Hopkins University “Provocative but careful, opinionated but persuasive . . . Beyond synthesizing current scholarship, he offers a cogent discussion of the evolving definition of lynching, the place of lynchers in civil society, and the slow-in-coming end of lynching. This book should be the point of entry for anyone interested in the tragic and sordid history of American lynching.” —W. Fitzhugh Brundage, author of Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 “A sophisticated and thought-provoking examination of the historical relationship between the American culture of lynching and the nation’s political traditions. This engaging and wide-ranging meditation on the connection between democracy, lynching, freedom, and slavery will be of interest to those in and outside of the academy.” —William Carrigan, Rowan University “In this sobering account, Rushdy makes clear that the cultural values that authorize racial violence are woven into the very essence of what it means to be American. This book helps us make sense of our past as well as our present.” —Jonathan Holloway, Yale University
Categories: History

Lynching Photographs

Lynching Photographs

Presents an analysis of lynching photographs, covering their history, meanings, uses, and displays.

Author: Dora Apel

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520253322

Category: Art

Page: 101

View: 559

Presents an analysis of lynching photographs, covering their history, meanings, uses, and displays.
Categories: Art

The End of American Lynching

The End of American Lynching

The End of American Lynching questions how we think about the dynamics of lynching, what lynchings mean to the society in which they occur, how lynching is defined, and the circumstances that lead to lynching.

Author: Ashraf H. A. Rushdy

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813552934

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 923

The End of American Lynching questions how we think about the dynamics of lynching, what lynchings mean to the society in which they occur, how lynching is defined, and the circumstances that lead to lynching. Ashraf H. A. Rushdy looks at three lynchings over the course of the twentieth century—one in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in 1911, one in Marion, Indiana, in 1930, and one in Jasper, Texas, in 1998—to see how Americans developed two distinct ways of thinking and talking about this act before and after the 1930s. One way takes seriously the legal and moral concept of complicity as a way to understand the dynamics of a lynching; this way of thinking can give us new perceptions into the meaning of mobs and the lynching photographs in which we find them. Another way, which developed in the 1940s and continues to influence us today, uses a strategy of denial to claim that lynchings have ended. Rushdy examines how the denial of lynching emerged and developed, providing insight into how and why we talk about lynching the way we do at the dawn of the twenty-first century. In doing so, he forces us to confront our responsibilities as American citizens and as human beings.
Categories: History

Living with Lynching

Living with Lynching

The Left of Black interview with author Koritha Mitchell begins at 14:00. An interview with Koritha Mitchell at The Ohio Channel.

Author: Koritha Mitchell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252093524

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 642

Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890–1930 demonstrates that popular lynching plays were mechanisms through which African American communities survived actual and photographic mob violence. Often available in periodicals, lynching plays were read aloud or acted out by black church members, schoolchildren, and families. Koritha Mitchell shows that African Americans performed and read the scripts in community settings to certify to each other that lynch victims were not the isolated brutes that dominant discourses made them out to be. Instead, the play scripts often described victims as honorable heads of household being torn from model domestic units by white violence. In closely analyzing the political and spiritual uses of black theatre during the Progressive Era, Mitchell demonstrates that audiences were shown affective ties in black families, a subject often erased in mainstream images of African Americans. Examining lynching plays as archival texts that embody and reflect broad networks of sociocultural activism and exchange in the lives of black Americans, Mitchell finds that audiences were rehearsing and improvising new ways of enduring in the face of widespread racial terrorism. Images of the black soldier, lawyer, mother, and wife helped readers assure each other that they were upstanding individuals who deserved the right to participate in national culture and politics. These powerful community coping efforts helped African Americans band together and withstand the nation's rejection of them as viable citizens.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Lynching

Lynching

Addressing one of the most controversial and emotive issues of American history, this book presents a thorough reexamination of the background, dynamics, and decline of American lynching.

Author: Robert W. Thurston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317102960

Category: History

Page: 442

View: 920

Addressing one of the most controversial and emotive issues of American history, this book presents a thorough reexamination of the background, dynamics, and decline of American lynching. It argues that collective homicide in the US can only be partly understood through a discussion of the unsettled southern political situation after 1865, but must also be seen in the context of a global conversation about changing cultural meanings of 'race'. A deeper comprehension of the course of mob murder and the dynamics that drove it emerges through comparing the situation in the US with violence that was and still is happening around the world. Drawing on a variety of approaches - historical, anthropological and literary - the study shows how concepts of imperialism, gender, sexuality, and civilization profoundly affected the course of mob murder in the US. Lynching provides thought-provoking analyses of cases where race was - and was not - a factor. The book is constructed as a series of case studies grouped into three thematic sections. Part I, Understanding Lynching, starts with accounts of mob murder around the world. Part II, Lynching and Cultural Change, examines shifting concepts of race, gender, and sexuality by drawing first on the romantic travel and adventure fiction of the era 1880-1920, from authors such as H. Rider Haggard and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Changing images of black and white bodies form another major focus of this section. Part III, Blood, Debate, and Redemption in Georgia, follows the story of American collective murder and growing opposition to it in Georgia, a key site of lynching, in the early twentieth century. By situating American mob murder in a wide international context, and viewing the phenomenon as more than simply a tool of racial control, this book presents a reappraisal of one of the most unpleasant, yet important periods of America's history, one that remains crucial for understanding race relations and collective violence around the world.
Categories: History

Lynching in America

Lynching in America

From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order."--Publisher description.

Author: Christopher Waldrep

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814793992

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 167

"Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order."--Publisher description.
Categories: History

Lynching Beyond Dixie

Lynching Beyond Dixie

This collection of essays by prominent and rising scholars fills this gap by illuminating the factors that distinguished lynching in the West, the Midwest, and the Mid-Atlantic.

Author: Michael J. Pfeifer

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252094651

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 545

In recent decades, scholars have explored much of the history of mob violence in the American South, especially in the years after Reconstruction. However, the lynching violence that occurred in American regions outside the South, where hundreds of persons, including Hispanics, whites, African Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans died at the hands of lynch mobs, has received less attention. This collection of essays by prominent and rising scholars fills this gap by illuminating the factors that distinguished lynching in the West, the Midwest, and the Mid-Atlantic. The volume adds to a more comprehensive history of American lynching and will be of interest to all readers interested in the history of violence across the varied regions of the United States. Contributors are Jack S. Blocker Jr., Brent M. S. Campney, William D. Carrigan, Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, Dennis B. Downey, Larry R. Gerlach, Kimberley Mangun, Helen McLure, Michael J. Pfeifer, Christopher Waldrep, Clive Webb, and Dena Lynn Winslow.
Categories: Social Science

A Spectacular Secret

A Spectacular Secret

Publisher Description

Author: Jacqueline Goldsby

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226301389

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 536

This incisive study takes on one of the grimmest secrets in America's national life—the history of lynching and, more generally, the public punishment of African Americans. Jacqueline Goldsby shows that lynching cannot be explained away as a phenomenon peculiar to the South or as the perverse culmination of racist politics. Rather, lynching—a highly visible form of social violence that has historically been shrouded in secrecy—was in fact a fundamental part of the national consciousness whose cultural logic played a pivotal role in the making of American modernity. To pursue this argument, Goldsby traces lynching's history by taking up select mob murders and studying them together with key literary works. She focuses on three prominent authors—Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Stephen Crane, and James Weldon Johnson—and shows how their own encounters with lynching influenced their analyses of it. She also examines a recently assembled archive of evidence—lynching photographs—to show how photography structured the nation's perception of lynching violence before World War I. Finally, Goldsby considers the way lynching persisted into the twentieth century, discussing the lynching of Emmett Till in 1955 and the ballad-elegies of Gwendolyn Brooks to which his murder gave rise. An empathic and perceptive work, A Spectacular Secret will make an important contribution to the study of American history and literature.
Categories: History

Rough Justice

Rough Justice

This work examines the influence of race, gender, and class on understandings of criminal justice and shows how they varied across regions.

Author: Michael James Pfeifer

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252029178

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 325

Investigates the pervasive and persistent commitment to "rough justice" that characterized rural and working class areas of most of the United States in the late nineteenth century. This work examines the influence of race, gender, and class on understandings of criminal justice and shows how they varied across regions.
Categories: Social Science

Lynching and Spectacle

Lynching and Spectacle

In Lynching and Spectacle, Amy Wood explains what it meant for white Americans to perform and witness these sadistic spectacles and how lynching played a role in establishing and affirming white supremacy.

Author: Amy Louise Wood

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807878111

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 725

Lynch mobs in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America exacted horrifying public torture and mutilation on their victims. In Lynching and Spectacle, Amy Wood explains what it meant for white Americans to perform and witness these sadistic spectacles and how lynching played a role in establishing and affirming white supremacy. Lynching, Wood argues, overlapped with a variety of cultural practices and performances, both traditional and modern, including public executions, religious rituals, photography, and cinema, all which encouraged the horrific violence and gave it social acceptability. However, she also shows how the national dissemination of lynching images ultimately fueled the momentum of the antilynching movement and the decline of the practice. Using a wide range of sources, including photos, newspaper reports, pro- and antilynching pamphlets, early films, and local city and church records, Wood reconfigures our understanding of lynching's relationship to modern life. Wood expounds on the critical role lynching spectacles played in establishing and affirming white supremacy at the turn of the century, particularly in towns and cities experiencing great social instability and change. She also shows how the national dissemination of lynching images fueled the momentum of the antilynching movement and ultimately led to the decline of lynching. By examining lynching spectacles alongside both traditional and modern practices and within both local and national contexts, Wood reconfigures our understanding of lynching's relationship to modern life.
Categories: History

Beyond the Rope

Beyond the Rope

Beyond the Rope is an interdisciplinary study that draws on narrative theory and cultural studies methodologies to trace African Americans' changing attitudes and relationships to lynching over the twentieth century.

Author: Karlos K. Hill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107044135

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 723

This book tells the story of African Americans' evolving attitudes towards lynching from the 1880s to the present. Unlike most histories of lynching, it explains how African Americans were both purveyors and victims of lynch mob violence and how this dynamic has shaped the meaning of lynching in black culture.
Categories: History

Popular Justice

Popular Justice

Manfred Berg traces the history of lynching in America from the colonial era to the present. Berg focuses on lynching as extralegal communal punishment performed by "ordinary" people.

Author: Manfred Berg

Publisher: Government Institutes

ISBN: 1566639204

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 391

Manfred Berg traces the history of lynching in America from the colonial era to the present. Berg focuses on lynching as extralegal communal punishment performed by "ordinary" people. He confronts racially fragmented historical memory and legacies of popular justice to help the reader make better sense of lynching as part of American history.
Categories: History

The 1891 New Orleans Lynchings and U S Italian Relations

The 1891 New Orleans Lynchings and U S  Italian Relations

Jeno F . Paulucci , National Italian American “ This fascinating inquiry , based on
both U . S . and Italian archives , explores lynching in the south , its resulting
travail for the Sicilian immigrants in N and the major crisis it produced in the
foreign ...

Author: Marco Rimanelli

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: UOM:39015029187559

Category: Social Science

Page: 425

View: 815

On the centenary of the 1891 New Orleans Crisis and U.S.-Italian war-scare, this authoritative study by Marco Rimanelli and Sheryl L. Postman represents the latest, and most complete and objective socio-politico-literary study of that period. Although long forgotten, this key domestic and diplomatic crisis exposed in a flash of violence all the simmering anti-Italian racial tensions rocking New Orleans and America. Ethnic hostility toward southern Italian immigration and "Mafia" criminality exploded in New Orleans with the murder of Police Chief D.C. Hennessy and the lynching by a 20,000-strong mob of 11 imprisoned Italians. Far from being spontaneous, the lynching was secretly engineered by Lousiana's establishment in a strategy to exterminate the "Mafia," expropriate the rich Italian tropical fruit trade with Central America, and especially, cajole the independent-minded Italians into joining the White Supremacist front, which disenfranchised Louisiana's Blacks in 1898. Nationally, the lynching split Americans between advocates and opposers of "popular justice" and anti-immigration laws. Even more importantly, the New Orleans Lynchings provoked a major international crisis and war-scare with Italy in 1891-92, while promoting at home the long awaited nationalistic "Reunification" of North and South against "foreign foes." The U.S. government's refusal to pay reparations until 1892 led Italy to break diplomatic relations, while both governments were trapped in a rigid international confrontation by their own domestic political fragility and collapsing electoral support. Finally America's own defenselessness against Italy's navy (The world's third largest) forced the U.S. to build a new modern navy, which first propelled them to victory in the 1898 Spanish-American War, and later on to global Superpowership.
Categories: Social Science

Strange Fruit

Strange Fruit

By focusing on women's unique view of lynching, this collection of plays reveals a social history of interracial cooperation between black and white women and an artistic tradition that continues to evolve through the work of African ...

Author: Kathy A. Perkins

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253211638

Category: Drama

Page: 423

View: 897

"These lynching dramas may not present the picture that America wants to see of itself, but these visions cannot be ignored because they are grounded—not only in the truth of white racism's toxic effect on our national existence but also in the truth that there exists a contesting, collective response that is part of an on-going and continually building momentum." —Theaatre Journal "A unique, powerful collection worthy of high school and college classroom assignment and discussion." —Bookwatch This anthology is the first to address the impact of lynching on U.S. theater and culture. By focusing on women's unique view of lynching, this collection of plays reveals a social history of interracial cooperation between black and white women and an artistic tradition that continues to evolve through the work of African American women artists. Included are plays spanning the period 1916 to 1994 from playwrights such as Angelina Weld Grimke, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Lillian Smith, and Michon Boston.
Categories: Drama

African American Review

African American Review

the Anti - Lynching Campaign section of organization's papers ( See Group 1 ,
Boxes C - 353 and C - 355 ) located in the Library of Congress and on microfilm .
I researched local responses to the incident while working as an assistant ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P01161193M

Category: African American arts

Page:

View: 362

Categories: African American arts

Western American Literature

Western American Literature

Reviewed by Bridget R. Cooks University of California , Irvine In this ambitious
historical research project , Lynching in the ... His text challenges the
assumptions that the history of lynchings belongs solely to the American South
and that black ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCBK:C094189665

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 747

Categories: American literature

Legacies of Lynching

Legacies of Lynching

Yet, Jonathan Markovitz notes, the act's symbolic power has endured long after the practice of lynching has largely faded away.Legacies of Lynching examines the evolution of lynching as a symbol of racial hatred and a metaphor for race ...

Author: Jonathan Markovitz

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816639957

Category: Social Science

Page: 227

View: 464

Between 1880 and 1930, thousands of African Americans were lynched in the United States. Beyond the horrific violence inflicted on these individuals, lynching terrorized whole communities and became a defining characteristic of Southern race relations in the Jim Crow era. As spectacle, lynching was intended to serve as a symbol of white supremacy. Yet, Jonathan Markovitz notes, the act's symbolic power has endured long after the practice of lynching has largely faded away.Legacies of Lynching examines the evolution of lynching as a symbol of racial hatred and a metaphor for race relations in popular culture, art, literature, and political speech. Markovitz credits the efforts of the antilynching movement with helping to ensure that lynching would be understood not as a method of punishment for black rapists but as a terrorist practice that provided stark evidence of the brutality of Southern racism and as America's most vivid symbol of racial oppression. Cinematic representations of lynching, from Birth of a Nation to Do the Right Thing, he contends, further transform the ways that American audiences remember and understand lynching, as have disturbing recent cases in which alleged or actual acts of racial violence reconfigured stereotypes of black criminality. Markovitz further reveals how lynching imagery has been politicized in contemporary society with the example of Clarence Thomas, who condemned the Senate's investigation into allegations of sexual harassment during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings as a "high-tech lynching."Even today, as revealed by the 1998 dragging death of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and the national soul-searching it precipitated, lynching continues to pervade America's collective memory. Markovitz concludes with an analysis of debates about a recent exhibition of photographs of lynchings, suggesting again how lynching as metaphor remains always in the background of our national discussions of race and racial relations.Jonathan Markovitz is a lecturer in sociology at the University of California, San Diego.
Categories: Social Science

American Journalism

American Journalism

in 1933 concluded that African - Americans were lynched for a wide variety of
alleged offenses , many of them frivolous or petty , such as " trying to act like a
white man " or mere suspicion of stealing hogs or cattle . The researchers ' review
of ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105015128379

Category: Journalism

Page:

View: 908

Categories: Journalism