American Indians, American Justice

Author: Vine Deloria, Jr.,Clifford M. Lytle

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292789475

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 7669

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Baffled by the stereotypes presented by Hollywood and much historical fiction, many other Americans find the contemporary American Indian an enigma. Compounding their confusion is the highly publicized struggle of the contemporary Indian for self-determination, lost land, cultural preservation, and fundamental human rights—a struggle dramatized both by public acts of protest and by precedent-setting legal actions. More and more, the battles of American Indians are fought—and won—in the political arena and the courts. American Indians, American Justice explores the complexities of the present Indian situation, particularly with regard to legal and political rights. It is the first book to present an overview of federal Indian law in language readably accessible to the layperson. Remarkably comprehensive, it is destined to become a standard sourcebook for all concerned with the plight of the contemporary Indian. Beginning with an examination of the historical relationship of Indians and the courts, the authors describe how tribal courts developed and operate today, and how they relate to federal and state governments. They define such key legal concepts as tribal sovereignty and Indian Country. By comparing and contrasting the workings of Indian and non-Indian legal institutions, the authors illustrate how Indian tribes have adapted their customs, values, and institutions to the demands of the modern world. Describing the activities of attorneys and Indian advocates in asserting and defending Indian rights, they identify the difficulties typically faced by Indians in the criminal and civil legal arenas and explore the public policy and legal rights of Indians as regards citizenship, voting rights, religious freedom, and basic governmental services.
Release

Criminal Justice in Native America

Author: Marianne O. Nielsen,Robert A. Silverman

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816526536

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 6993

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Native Americans are disproportionately represented as offenders in the U.S. criminal justice system. However, until recently there was little investigation into the reasons. Furthermore, there has been little acknowledgment of the positive contributions of Native Americans to the criminal justice system- in rehabilitating offenders, aiding victims, and supporting service providers. This book offers a valuable and contemporary overview of how the American criminal justice system impacts Native Americans on both sides of the law. Contributors- many of whom are Native Americans- rank among the top scholars in their fields. Some of the chapters treat broad subjects, including crime, police, courts, victimization, corrections, and jurisdiction. Others delve into more specific topics, including hate crimes against Native Americans, state-corporate crimes against Native Americans, tribal peacemaking, and cultural stresses of police officers. Separate chapters are devoted to women and juveniles.
Release

Native American Justice

Author: Laurence French

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780830415755

Category: Games

Page: 244

View: 9800

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Tracing the history of U.S. Indian policy from the eighteenth century to the present, this book explores how the Euro-American ethos of Manifest Destiny fueled a devastating campaign of ethnic cleansing against Native Americans. After decimating the Indian population through organized massacres, the U.S. government forcibly removed the survivors from their homelands to live on reservations. Physical genocide gave way to attempts at cultural eradication through policies designed to Christianize and civilize the Indians. These policies included the traumatic separation of children from their families for indoctrination and abuse in remote boarding schools. Treaties and policies are linked to the concept of federal paternalism and its relationship to pervasive health and social problems endemic in Indian country, including substance abuse and addiction. The book is divided into three main parts. Part I covers the US government's treatment of Indians from the colonial era to the present. Part II describes how the Cherokees' aboriginal concept of blood vengeance gave way to justice models based on the Protestant ethic. Part II also discusses governmental restrictions of religious expression by Indians. Part III delves into the judicial system within Indian country, looking at tribal courts, the Navajo court system, law enforcement, and corrections. An epilogue covers the incompleteness of social justice in Indian country, as reflected in problems such as the misuse of Indian money by the federal government. A Burnham Publishers book
Release

American Indian Sovereignty and the U.S. Supreme Court

The Masking of Justice

Author: David E. Wilkins

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292774001

Category: Social Science

Page: 421

View: 9134

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"Like the miner's canary, the Indian marks the shift from fresh air to poison gas in our political atmosphere; and our treatment of Indians, even more than our treatment of other minorities, reflects the rise and fall in our democratic faith," wrote Felix S. Cohen, an early expert in Indian legal affairs. In this book, David Wilkins charts the "fall in our democratic faith" through fifteen landmark cases in which the Supreme Court significantly curtailed Indian rights. He offers compelling evidence that Supreme Court justices selectively used precedents and facts, both historical and contemporary, to arrive at decisions that have undermined tribal sovereignty, legitimated massive tribal land losses, sanctioned the diminishment of Indian religious rights, and curtailed other rights as well. These case studies—and their implications for all minority groups—make important and troubling reading at a time when the Supreme Court is at the vortex of political and moral developments that are redefining the nature of American government, transforming the relationship between the legal and political branches, and altering the very meaning of federalism.
Release

American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights

Author: Laughlin McDonald

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806186003

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 9433

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The struggle for voting rights was not limited to African Americans in the South. American Indians also faced discrimination at the polls and still do today. This book explores their fight for equal voting rights and carefully documents how non-Indian officials have tried to maintain dominance over Native peoples despite the rights they are guaranteed as American citizens. Laughlin McDonald has participated in numerous lawsuits brought on behalf of Native Americans in Montana, Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. This litigation challenged discriminatory election practices such as at-large elections, redistricting plans crafted to dilute voting strength, unfounded allegations of election fraud on reservations, burdensome identification and registration requirements, lack of language assistance, and noncompliance with the Voting Rights Act. McDonald devotes special attention to the VRA and its amendments, whose protections are central to realizing the goal of equal political participation. McDonald describes past and present-day discrimination against Indians, including land seizures, destruction of bison herds, attempts to eradicate Native language and culture, and efforts to remove and in some cases even exterminate tribes. Because of such treatment, he argues, Indians suffer a severely depressed socioeconomic status, voting is sharply polarized along racial lines, and tribes are isolated and lack meaningful interaction with non-Indians in communities bordering reservations. Far more than a record of litigation, American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights paints a broad picture of Indian political participation by incorporating expert reports, legislative histories, newspaper accounts, government archives, and hundreds of interviews with tribal members. This in-depth study of Indian voting rights recounts the extraordinary progress American Indians have made and looks toward a more just future.
Release

Encyclopedia of American Indian History [4 volumes]

Author: Bruce E. Johansen,Barry M. Pritzker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851098186

Category: Social Science

Page: 1423

View: 9356

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This new four-volume encyclopedia is the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource available on the history of Native Americans, providing a lively, authoritative survey ranging from human origins to present-day controversies. • Approximately 450 entries within four separate volumes • Approximately 110 contributors from among the foremost scholars in the fields, including Troy Johnson on self-determination movements, Richard King on sports mascots, and Jon Rehyner on recovery of Native languages • Hundreds of images, including illustrations, photographs, and maps • A series of helpful research tools rounding out the fourth volume, including an extensive chronology, topical bibliography, and a comprehensive index
Release

American Indian Politics and the American Political System

Author: David Eugene Wilkins

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742553460

Category: Political Science

Page: 375

View: 6300

DOWNLOAD NOW »

American Indian Politics and the American Political System provides a comprehensive introduction to the history, structure, and function of tribal governments and their relationship to contemporary American politics. The second edition incorporates fresh census data, thorough discussion of the critical electoral changes in the 2000 and 2004 national elections, and data on President Bush's first and second terms. This edition also explores the effects of changes in U.S. Senate and House personnel and state legislation on Indian rights and the state-tribal relationship.
Release

Braid of Feathers

American Indian Law and Contemporary Tribal Life

Author: Frank Pommersheim

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520919150

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 7549

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In this ambitious and moving book, Frank Pommersheim, who lived and worked on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation for ten years, challenges the dominant legal history of American Indians and their tribes—a history that concedes far too much power to the laws and courts of the "conqueror." Writing from the perspective of the reservation and contemporary Indian life, Pommersheim makes an urgent call for the advancement of tribal sovereignty and of tribal court systems that are based on Indian culture and values. Taking as its starting point the cultural, spiritual, and physical nature of the reservation, Braid of Feathers goes on to trace the development of Indian law from the 1770s to the present. Pommersheim considers the meaning of justice from the indigenous point of view. He offers a trenchant analysis of the tribal courts, stressing the importance of language, narrative, and story. He concludes by offering a "geography of hope,"one that lies in the West, where Native Americans control a significant amount of natural resources, and where a new ethic of development and preservation is emerging within the dominant society. Pommersheim challenges both Indians and non-Indians to forge an alliance at the local level based on respect and reciprocity—to create solidarity, not undo difference.
Release

American Indians

social justice and public policy

Author: Donald E. Green

Publisher: Univ Wisconsin System Inst

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 525

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Release