American Indian Treaties

American Indian Treaties

Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning.

Author: Francis Paul Prucha

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520919165

Category: History

Page: 562

View: 429

American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive history of these treaties and their role in American life. Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning. The term "treaty" implies a contract between sovereign independent nations, yet Indians were always in a position of inequality and dependence as negotiators, a fact that complicates their current attempts to regain their rights and tribal sovereignty. Prucha's impeccably researched book, based on a close analysis of every treaty, makes possible a thorough understanding of a legal dilemma whose legacy is so palpably felt today.
Categories: History

The Indians in American Society

The Indians in American Society

Describes the history of the policies of the American government toward the Indians and discusses how paternalism caused the Indians to become dependent on the government

Author: Francis Paul Prucha

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520063440

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 583

Describes the history of the policies of the American government toward the Indians and discusses how paternalism caused the Indians to become dependent on the government
Categories: History

Cohen s Handbook of Federal Indian Law

Cohen s Handbook of Federal Indian Law

Press 2013); Francis Paul Prucha, American Indian Treaties: The History of a
Political Anomaly (Univ. Cal. Press 1997); Robert A. Williams, Jr., Linking Arms
Together: American Indian Treaty Visions of Law and Peace, 1600–1800 (Oxford
 ...

Author:

Publisher: LexisNexis

ISBN: 9780327171522

Category: Law

Page: 102

View: 381

Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law is an encyclopedic treatise written by experts in the field, and provides general overviews to relevant information as well as in-depth study of specific areas within this complex area of federal law. This is an updated and revised edition of what has been referred to as the "bible" of federal Indian law. This publication focuses on the relationship between tribes, the states and the federal government within the context of civil and criminal jurisdiction, as well as areas of resource management and government structure. The 2012 Edition of Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law also includes coverage of: • Current topics such as Indian gaming and taxation • History and structure of tribal governments and tribal law • Tribal and individual Indian property rights, including intellectual property rights • Water rights • Hunting, fishing, and gathering rights • Economic development issues • Government programs This compact publication is the only comprehensive treatise explicating one of the most difficult areas of federal law. Used by judges as well as practitioners, this publication provides the tools to understand the law and to find relevant cases, statutes, regulations, and opinions critical to answering legal questions about federal Indian law. This updated edition remains the definitive guide to federal Indian law.
Categories: Law

Encyclopedia of American Indian History 4 volumes

Encyclopedia of American Indian History  4 volumes

After the Indian Claims Commission was founded in 1946, the Sioux sought to
reintroduce the claim, but it was barred because of the earlier review as a matter
of res judicata. ... American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly.

Author: Bruce E. Johansen

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781851098187

Category: Social Science

Page: 1423

View: 595

This new four-volume encyclopedia is the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource available on the history of Native Americans, providing a lively, authoritative survey ranging from human origins to present-day controversies. • Approximately 450 entries within four separate volumes • Approximately 110 contributors from among the foremost scholars in the fields, including Troy Johnson on self-determination movements, Richard King on sports mascots, and Jon Rehyner on recovery of Native languages • Hundreds of images, including illustrations, photographs, and maps • A series of helpful research tools rounding out the fourth volume, including an extensive chronology, topical bibliography, and a comprehensive index
Categories: Social Science

Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Society

Encyclopedia of Race  Ethnicity  and Society

endeavored to maintain the region free from outside, White, influences, according
to the treaty. Gold was discovered officially during the ... American Indian Treaties
: The History of a Political Anomaly. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Author: Richard T. Schaefer

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412926942

Category: Social Science

Page: 1622

View: 999

This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area
Categories: Social Science

Separate Peoples One Land

Separate Peoples  One Land

4; Prucha, The Great Father; Frances Paul Prucha, American Indian Treaties: The
History of a Political Anomaly (Berkeley, 1994); Shoemaker, A Strange Likeness,
83–103. 9. White, Middle Ground; Alexandra Harmon, Indians in the Making: ...

Author: Cynthia Cumfer

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469606590

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 837

Exploring the mental worlds of the major groups interacting in a borderland setting, Cynthia Cumfer offers a broad, multiracial intellectual and cultural history of the Tennessee frontier in the Revolutionary and early national periods, leading up to the era of rapid westward expansion and Cherokee removal. Attentive to the complexities of race, gender, class, and spirituality, Cumfer offers a rare glimpse into the cultural logic of Native American, African American, and Euro-American men and women as contact with one another powerfully transformed their ideas about themselves and the territory they came to share. The Tennessee frontier shaped both Cherokee and white assumptions about diplomacy and nationhood. After contact, both groups moved away from local and personal notions about polity to embrace nationhood. Excluded from the nationalization process, slaves revived and modified African and American premises about patronage and community, while free blacks fashioned an African American doctrine of freedom that was both communal and individual. Paying particular attention to the influence of older European concepts of civilization, Cumfer shows how Tennesseans, along with other Americans and Europeans, modified European assumptions to contribute to a discourse about civilization, one both dynamic and destructive, which has profoundly shaped world history.
Categories: History

The Great Confusion in Indian Affairs

The Great Confusion in Indian Affairs

Steven Pavlik (Los Angeles: UCLA American Indian Studies Center, 1998), 121;
Edward H. Spicer, Cycles of ... Prucha, American Indian Treaties: The History of a
Political Anomaly (Berkeley and Los Angeles: Univ. of California Press, 1994).

Author: Tom Holm

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292779570

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 194

The United States government thought it could make Indians "vanish." After the Indian Wars ended in the 1880s, the government gave allotments of land to individual Native Americans in order to turn them into farmers and sent their children to boarding schools for indoctrination into the English language, Christianity, and the ways of white people. Federal officials believed that these policies would assimilate Native Americans into white society within a generation or two. But even after decades of governmental efforts to obliterate Indian culture, Native Americans refused to vanish into the mainstream, and tribal identities remained intact. This revisionist history reveals how Native Americans' sense of identity and "peoplehood" helped them resist and eventually defeat the U.S. government's attempts to assimilate them into white society during the Progressive Era (1890s-1920s). Tom Holm discusses how Native Americans, though effectively colonial subjects without political power, nonetheless maintained their group identity through their native languages, religious practices, works of art, and sense of homeland and sacred history. He also describes how Euro-Americans became increasingly fascinated by and supportive of Native American culture, spirituality, and environmental consciousness. In the face of such Native resiliency and non-Native advocacy, the government's assimilation policy became irrelevant and inevitably collapsed. The great confusion in Indian affairs during the Progressive Era, Holm concludes, ultimately paved the way for Native American tribes to be recognized as nations with certain sovereign rights.
Categories: Social Science

Legal Research and Law Library Management

Legal Research and Law Library Management

8 The original treaties that remain in force provide the basis for current protection
of Indian lands and reserved rights such as hunting , fishing and ... See also F . P
. Prucha ' s American Indian Treaties , the History of a Political Anomaly .

Author: Julius J. Marke

Publisher: Law Journal Press

ISBN: 1588520137

Category: Law libraries

Page: 297

View: 872

Categories: Law libraries

Nation to Nation

Nation to Nation

American Indian Treaties. History of a Political Anomaly. Berkeley: University of
California Press, 1997. Prucha, Francis Paul. The Great rather: the United States
Government and the American Indians. 2 vols. Lincoln: University of Nebraska ...

Author: Suzan Shown Harjo

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 9781588344793

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 819

Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indians explores the promises, diplomacy, and betrayals involved in treaties and treaty making between the United States government and Native Nations. One side sought to own the riches of North America and the other struggled to hold on to traditional homelands and ways of life. The book reveals how the ideas of honor, fair dealings, good faith, rule of law, and peaceful relations between nations have been tested and challenged in historical and modern times. The book consistently demonstrates how and why centuries-old treaties remain living, relevant documents for both Natives and non-Natives in the 21st century.
Categories: Social Science

Recognition Sovereignty Struggles and Indigenous Rights in the United States

Recognition  Sovereignty Struggles  and Indigenous Rights in the United States

For additional background on the California treaties, see Francis Paul Prucha,
American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly (Berkeley: University
of California Press, 1994): 243–46. 18. Cohen, Cohen's Handbook, 159 ...

Author: Amy E. Den Ouden

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469602172

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 773

This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide. Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. Den Ouden, Timothy Q. Evans (Haliwa-Saponi), Les W. Field, Angela A. Gonzales (Hopi), Rae Gould (Nipmuc), J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), K. Alexa Koenig, Alan Leventhal, Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Wilkins (Lumbee).
Categories: Social Science

Writing Indian Nations

Writing Indian Nations

Native Intellectuals and the Politics of Historiography, 1827-1863 Maureen
Konkle. Inhabitants of North America, with Particular Reference to the Seneca
Nation. Philadelphia: J. ... American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political
Anomaly.

Author: Maureen Konkle

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807875902

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 975

In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.
Categories: Social Science

Crooked Paths to Allotment

Crooked Paths to Allotment

Owens, Robert M. Mr. Jefferson's Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the
Origins of American Indian Policy. Norman: University of ... Press, 1976. _____.
American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly. bibliography : 213.

Author: C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807837412

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 571

Standard narratives of Native American history view the nineteenth century in terms of steadily declining Indigenous sovereignty, from removal of southeastern tribes to the 1887 General Allotment Act. In Crooked Paths to Allotment, C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa complicates these narratives, focusing on political moments when viable alternatives to federal assimilation policies arose. In these moments, Native American reformers and their white allies challenged coercive practices and offered visions for policies that might have allowed Indigenous nations to adapt at their own pace and on their own terms. Examining the contests over Indian policy from Reconstruction through the Gilded Age, Genetin-Pilawa reveals the contingent state of American settler colonialism. Genetin-Pilawa focuses on reformers and activists, including Tonawanda Seneca Ely S. Parker and Council Fire editor Thomas A. Bland, whose contributions to Indian policy debates have heretofore been underappreciated. He reveals how these men and their allies opposed such policies as forced land allotment, the elimination of traditional cultural practices, mandatory boarding school education for Indian youth, and compulsory participation in the market economy. Although the mainstream supporters of assimilation successfully repressed these efforts, the ideas and policy frameworks they espoused established a tradition of dissent against disruptive colonial governance.
Categories: History

Essays in the History of Canadian Law

Essays in the History of Canadian Law

Pucha, American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly (Berkeley:
University of California Press, 1994); K. McNeil, Common Law Aboriginal Title (
Oxford: Clarendon, 1989). Compare S.G. Drummond, Incorporating the Familiar:
An ...

Author: George Blaine Baker

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442670068

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 780

The essays in this volume deal with the legal history of the Province of Quebec, Upper and Lower Canada, and the Province of Canada between the British conquest of 1759 and confederation of the British North America colonies in 1867. The backbone of the modern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec, this geographic area was unified politically for more than half of the period under consideration. As such, four of the papers are set in the geographic cradle of modern Quebec, four treat nineteenth-century Ontario, and the remaining four deal with the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes watershed as a whole. The authors come from disciplines as diverse as history, socio-legal studies, women’s studies, and law. The majority make substantial use of second-language sources in their essays, which shade into intellectual history, social and family history, regulatory history, and political history.
Categories: History

Kindred by Choice

Kindred by Choice

Germans and American Indians since 1800 H. Glenn Penny. Otto, Victor. ... “'
Playing Ourselves': First Nations and Native American Interpreters at Living
History Sites.” Public ... American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political
Anomaly.

Author: H. Glenn Penny

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469607658

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 687

How do we explain the persistent preoccupation with American Indians in Germany and the staggering numbers of Germans one encounters as visitors to Indian country? As H. Glenn Penny demonstrates, that preoccupation is rooted in an affinity for American Indians that has permeated German cultures for two centuries. This affinity stems directly from German polycentrism, notions of tribalism, a devotion to resistance, a longing for freedom, and a melancholy sense of shared fate. Locating the origins of the fascination for Indian life in the transatlantic world of German cultures in the nineteenth century, Penny explores German settler colonialism in the American Midwest, the rise and fall of German America, and the transnational worlds of American Indian performers. As he traces this phenomenon through the twentieth century, Penny engages debates about race, masculinity, comparative genocides, and American Indians' reactions to Germans' interests in them. He also assesses what persists of the affinity across the political ruptures of modern German history and challenges readers to rethink how cultural history is made.
Categories: History

The White Earth Nation

The White Earth Nation

... be necessary to protect the range from deterioration,” according to the Indian
Reorganization Act. Francis Paul Prucha noted in American Indian Treaties: The
History of a Political Anomaly thatJohn Collier, the commissioner of Indian Affairs,
 ...

Author: Gerald Vizenor

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803244658

Category: Social Science

Page: 112

View: 427

The White Earth Nation of Anishinaabeg Natives ratified a new constitution in 2009, the first indigenous democratic constitution, on a reservation in Minnesota. Many Native constitutions were written by the federal government, and with little knowledge of the people and cultures. The White Earth Nation set out to create a constitution that reflected its own culture. The resulting document provides a clear Native perspective on sovereignty, independent governance, traditional leadership values, and the importance of individual and human rights. This volume includes the text of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation; an introduction by David E. Wilkins, a legal and political scholar who was a special consultant to the White Earth Constitutional Convention; an essay by Gerald Vizenor, the delegate and principal writer of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation; and articles first published in Anishinaabeg Today by Jill Doerfler, who coordinated and participated in the deliberations and ratification of the Constitution. Together these essays and the text of the Constitution provide direct insight into the process of the delegate deliberations, the writing and ratification of this groundbreaking document, and the current constitutional, legal, and political debates about new constitutions.
Categories: Social Science

Black Slaves Indian Masters

Black Slaves  Indian Masters

Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South Barbara
Krauthamer ... Naylor, Celia E. African Cherokees in Indian Territory: From
Chattel to Citizens. ... American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political
Anomaly.

Author: Barbara Krauthamer

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469607115

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 931

From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.
Categories: Social Science

Aboriginal Title

Aboriginal Title

210 FP Prucha, American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly (
Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1994), 408 and 385. For an
American example of off-reservation treaty hunting and fishing rights, see
Minnesota v Mille ...

Author: P. G. McHugh

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191018541

Category: Law

Page: 378

View: 422

Aboriginal title represents one of the most remarkable and controversial legal developments in the common law world of the late-twentieth century. Overnight it changed the legal position of indigenous peoples. The common law doctrine gave sudden substance to the tribes' claims to justiciable property rights over their traditional lands, catapulting these up the national agenda and jolting them out of a previous culture of governmental inattention. In a series of breakthrough cases national courts adopted the argument developed first in western Canada, and then New Zealand and Australia by a handful of influential scholars. By the beginning of the millennium the doctrine had spread to Malaysia, Belize, southern Africa and had a profound impact upon the rapid development of international law of indigenous peoples' rights. This book is a history of this doctrine and the explosion of intellectual activity arising from this inrush of legalism into the tribes' relations with the Anglo settler state. The author is one of the key scholars involved from the doctrine's appearance in the early 1980s as an exhortation to the courts, and a figure who has both witnessed and contributed to its acceptance and subsequent pattern of development. He looks critically at the early conceptualisation of the doctrine, its doctrinal elaboration in Canada and Australia - the busiest jurisdictions - through a proprietary paradigm located primarily (and constrictively) inside adjudicative processes. He also considers the issues of inter-disciplinary thought and practice arising from national legal systems' recognition of aboriginal land rights, including the emergent and associated themes of self-determination that surfaced more overtly during the 1990s and after. The doctrine made modern legal history, and it is still making it.
Categories: Law

Exchange

Exchange

Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs , Report of the Secretary of Interior .
Flathead ... The 1855 Hell Gate Treaty and the Origin of the Flathead Indian
Reservation . Edited by ... American Indian Treaties . The History of a Political
Anomaly .

Author: Pierre Lagayette

Publisher: Presses Paris Sorbonne

ISBN: 284050359X

Category: Cultural relations

Page: 395

View: 773

L'échange, comme système de transaction entre individus ou communautés humaines, s'applique d'abord aux bien matériels, mais exprime aussi d'autres modalités d'interaction, symboliques, philosophiques ou idéologiques. Le présent ouvrage se penche sur la façon dont se présente ou se représente l'activité d'échange en Amérique du Nord, traditionnel carrefour de cultures et lieu de mélanges, où se sont élaborés, à mi-chemin entre Europe et Pacifique, bien des paradigmes du contact, de l'échange et du progrès. On trouvera ici un assortiment de textes qui examinent aussi bien la pratique concrète de l'échange - commercial ou culturel - que ses manifestations imaginaires. Chronologiquement, ces essais couvrent une période qui court de l'exploration de Lewis et Clark jusqu'à l'ère de l'Internet. On y aborde les relations ethniques, notamment avec les tribus indiennes, et les conditions régionales ou locales de l'échange, par exemple du côté de la frontière mexicaine, ou de la Californie, ou dans les îles du Pacifique. Le lecteur entame ainsi un périple qui le conduit des zones-frontières continentales jusqu'au-delà des océans, des banlieues aux grands espaces de l'Ouest, sans pour autant oublier les grands voyages de l'esprit que garantissent les grandes œuvres littéraires ou la musique. L'idée-force qui se dégage de ce volume, c'est la nécessaire revalorisation de l'échange comme moyen d'entente entre les peuples, comme support d'une idéologie transnationale fondée sur la compréhension et l'équilibre des intérêts, afin que cessent les exclusions et s'apaisent les rancœurs dans un contexte mondial d'interdépendances accrues.
Categories: Cultural relations

West from Appomattox

West from Appomattox

The Treaty of Fort Laramie is at 2:998– 1007, 1008–15. Francis Paul Prucha,
American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly (Berkeley: University
of California Press, 1994), pp. 279–85. Prucha, Great Father, 1: 488–96. 64.
Hagan ...

Author: Heather Cox Richardson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300137850

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 318

“This thoughtful, engaging examination of the Reconstruction Era . . . will be appealing . . . to anyone interested in the roots of present-day American politics” (Publishers Weekly). The story of Reconstruction is not simply about the rebuilding of the South after the Civil War. In many ways, the late nineteenth century defined modern America, as Southerners, Northerners, and Westerners forged a national identity that united three very different regions into a country that could become a world power. A sweeping history of the United States from the era of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt, this engaging book tracks the formation of the American middle class while stretching the boundaries of our understanding of Reconstruction. Historian Heather Cox Richardson ties the North and West into the post–Civil War story that usually focuses narrowly on the South. By weaving together the experiences of real individuals who left records in their own words—from ordinary Americans such as a plantation mistress, a Native American warrior, and a labor organizer, to prominent historical figures such as Andrew Carnegie, Julia Ward Howe, Booker T. Washington, and Sitting Bull—Richardson tells a story about the creation of modern America.
Categories: History

The Iron Way

The Iron Way

Railroads, the Civil War, and the Making of Modern America William G. Thomas
... And Francis Paul Prucha, American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political
Anomaly (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994), 235-287. For the most ...

Author: William G. Thomas

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300171686

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 708

How railroads both united and divided us: “Integrates military and social history…a must-read for students, scholars and enthusiasts alike.”—Civil War Monitor Beginning with Frederick Douglass’s escape from slavery in 1838 on the railroad, and ending with the driving of the golden spike to link the transcontinental railroad in 1869, this book charts a critical period of American expansion and national formation, one largely dominated by the dynamic growth of railroads and telegraphs. William G. Thomas brings new evidence to bear on railroads, the Confederate South, slavery, and the Civil War era, based on groundbreaking research in digitized sources never available before. The Iron Way revises our ideas about the emergence of modern America and the role of the railroads in shaping the sectional conflict. Both the North and the South invested in railroads to serve their larger purposes, Thomas contends. Though railroads are often cited as a major factor in the Union’s victory, he shows that they were also essential to the formation of “the South” as a unified region. He discusses the many—and sometimes unexpected—effects of railroad expansion, and proposes that America’s great railroads became an important symbolic touchstone for the nation’s vision of itself. “In this provocative and deeply researched book, William G. Thomas follows the railroad into virtually every aspect of Civil War history, showing how it influenced everything from slavery’s antebellum expansion to emancipation and segregation—from guerrilla warfare to grand strategy. At every step, Thomas challenges old assumptions and finds new connections on this much-traveled historical landscape."—T.J. Stiles, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt
Categories: History