Alfred Tarski Philosophy of Language and Logic

Alfred Tarski  Philosophy of Language and Logic

This study looks to the work of Tarski's mentors Stanislaw Lesniewski and Tadeusz Kotarbinski, and reconsiders all of the major issues in Tarski scholarship in light of the conception of Intuitionistic Formalism developed: semantics, truth, ...

Author: Douglas Patterson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230367227

Category: Mathematics

Page: 262

View: 502

This study looks to the work of Tarski's mentors Stanislaw Lesniewski and Tadeusz Kotarbinski, and reconsiders all of the major issues in Tarski scholarship in light of the conception of Intuitionistic Formalism developed: semantics, truth, paradox, logical consequence.
Categories: Mathematics

The Logical Syntax of Language

The Logical Syntax of Language

Available for the first time in 20 years, here is the Rudolf Carnap's famous “principle of tolerance” by which everyone is free to mix and match the rules of language and logic.

Author: Rudolf Carnap

Publisher: Open Court Publishing

ISBN: 9780812695243

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 505

Available for the first time in 20 years, here is the Rudolf Carnap's famous "principle of tolerance” by which everyone is free to mix and match the rules of language and logic. In The Logical Syntax of Language, Carnap explains how his entire theory of language structure came to him like a vision when he was ill. He postulates that concepts of the theory of logic are purely syntactical and therefore can be formulated in logical syntax.
Categories: Philosophy

Alfred Tarski and the Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages

Alfred Tarski and the  Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages

In J. Jadacki (Ed.), Alfred Tarski: dedukcja i semantyka (déduction et sémantique) (pp. 61–76). Wydawnictwo Naukowe Semper. Patterson, D. (2012). Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of language and logic. New York: Palgrave. Putnam, H. (1994).

Author: Monika Gruber

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319326160

Category: Philosophy

Page: 187

View: 640

This book provides a detailed commentary on the classic monograph by Alfred Tarski, and offers a reinterpretation and retranslation of the work using the original Polish text and the English and German translations. In the original work, Tarski presents a method for constructing definitions of truth for classical, quantificational formal languages. Furthermore, using the defined notion of truth, he demonstrates that it is possible to provide intuitively adequate definitions of the semantic notions of definability and denotation and that the notion in a structure can be defined in a way that is analogous to that used to define truth. Tarski’s piece is considered to be one of the major contributions to logic, semantics, and epistemology in the 20th century. However, the author points out that some mistakes were introduced into the text when it was translated into German in 1935. As the 1956 English version of the work was translated from the German text, those discrepancies were carried over in addition to new mistakes. The author has painstakingly compared the three texts, sentence-by-sentence, highlighting the inaccurate translations, offering explanations as to how they came about, and commenting on how they have influenced the content and suggesting a correct interpretation of certain passages. Furthermore, the author thoroughly examines Tarski’s article, offering interpretations and comments on the work.
Categories: Philosophy

Philosophy and Logical Syntax

Philosophy and Logical Syntax

The purpose of the book -- as of the lectures -- is to give a first impression of our method and of the direction of our questions and investigations to those who are not yet acquainted with them.' -- From the Preface.

Author: Rudolf Carnap

Publisher: Thoemmes Press

ISBN: UOM:39015010802141

Category: Science

Page: 100

View: 232

'My endeavour in these pages is to explain the main features of the method of philosophizing which we, the Vienna Circle, use, and by using try to develop further. It is the method of the logical analysis of science, or more precisely, of the syntactical analysis of scientific language.... The purpose of the book -- as of the lectures -- is to give a first impression of our method and of the direction of our questions and investigations to those who are not yet acquainted with them.' -- From the Preface.
Categories: Science

Semantics and Truth

Semantics and Truth

The book provides a historical (with an outline of the history of the concept of truth from antiquity to our time) and systematic exposition of the semantic theory of truth formulated by Alfred Tarski in the 1930s.

Author: Jan Woleński

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030245368

Category: Philosophy

Page: 375

View: 885

The book provides a historical (with an outline of the history of the concept of truth from antiquity to our time) and systematic exposition of the semantic theory of truth formulated by Alfred Tarski in the 1930s. This theory became famous very soon and inspired logicians and philosophers. It has two different, but interconnected aspects: formal-logical and philosophical. The book deals with both, but it is intended mostly as a philosophical monograph. It explains Tarski’s motivation and presents discussions about his ideas (pro and contra) as well as points out various applications of the semantic theory of truth to philosophical problems (truth-criteria, realism and anti-realism, future contingents or the concept of correspondence between language and reality).
Categories: Philosophy

The Lvov Warsaw School Past and Present

The Lvov Warsaw School  Past and Present

Tarski,. His. Background. and. His. Ideas. 1. Bro ̇zek, A., Chybi ́nska, A., Jadacki, J.J., Wole ́nski, J. (eds.): ... Feferman, A., Feferman, S.: Alfred Tarski: Life and Logic. ... D.: Alfred Tarski. Philosophy of Language and Logic.

Author: Ángel Garrido

Publisher: Birkhäuser

ISBN: 9783319654300

Category: Mathematics

Page: 815

View: 448

This is a collection of new investigations and discoveries on the history of a great tradition, the Lvov-Warsaw School of logic and mathematics, by the best specialists from all over the world. The papers range from historical considerations to new philosophical, logical and mathematical developments of this impressive School, including applications to Computer Science, Mathematics, Metalogic, Scientific and Analytic Philosophy, Theory of Models and Linguistics.
Categories: Mathematics

Introduction to Symbolic Logic and Its Applications

Introduction to Symbolic Logic and Its Applications

Clear, comprehensive, and rigorous treatment develops the subject from elementary concepts to the construction and analysis of relatively complex logical languages. Hundreds of problems, examples, and exercises. 1958 edition.

Author: Rudolf Carnap

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486143491

Category: Mathematics

Page: 272

View: 293

Clear, comprehensive, and rigorous treatment develops the subject from elementary concepts to the construction and analysis of relatively complex logical languages. Hundreds of problems, examples, and exercises. 1958 edition.
Categories: Mathematics

Meaning and Necessity

Meaning and Necessity

"This book is valuable as expounding in full a theory of meaning that has its roots in the work of Frege and has been of the widest influence. . . . The chief virtue of the book is its systematic character.

Author: Rudolf Carnap

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226093475

Category: Philosophy

Page: 258

View: 674

"This book is valuable as expounding in full a theory of meaning that has its roots in the work of Frege and has been of the widest influence. . . . The chief virtue of the book is its systematic character. From Frege to Quine most philosophical logicians have restricted themselves by piecemeal and local assaults on the problems involved. The book is marked by a genial tolerance. Carnap sees himself as proposing conventions rather than asserting truths. However he provides plenty of matter for argument."—Anthony Quinton, Hibbert Journal
Categories: Philosophy

Reason causation and compatibility with the phenomena

Reason  causation and compatibility with the phenomena

Tarski regarded the truth and assertability of all instances of a sentence in a language L as not only a ... and a finite group of operations of inference, “which 40Patterson (2012), Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of Language and Logic, p.

Author: Basil Evangelidis

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 9781622737758

Category: Science

Page: 207

View: 460

'Reason, Causation and Compatibility with the Phenomena' strives to give answers to the philosophical problem of the interplay between realism, explanation and experience. This book is a compilation of essays that recollect significant conceptions of rival terms such as determinism and freedom, reason and appearance, power and knowledge. This title discusses the progress made in epistemology and natural philosophy, especially the steps that led from the ancient theory of atomism to the modern quantum theory, and from mathematization to analytic philosophy. Moreover, it provides possible gateways from modern deadlocks of theory either through approaches to consciousness or through historical critique of intellectual authorities. This work will be of interest to those either researching or studying in colleges and universities, especially in the departments of philosophy, history of science, philosophy of science, philosophy of physics and quantum mechanics, history of ideas and culture. Greek and Latin Literature students and instructors may also find this book to be both a fascinating and valuable point of reference.
Categories: Science

Alfred Tarski

Alfred Tarski

Publisher Description

Author: Anita Burdman Feferman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521802407

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 425

View: 741

Publisher Description
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Carnap Tarski and Quine at Harvard

Carnap  Tarski  and Quine at Harvard

II of Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, pp. 3–36. Patterson, D. 2012. Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of Language and Logic. History of Analytic Philosophy. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. Poincaré, H. 1902/1905.

Author: Greg Frost-Arnold

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 9780812698374

Category: Philosophy

Page: 270

View: 300

During the academic year 1940-1941, several giants of analytic philosophy congregated at Harvard: Bertrand Russell, Alfred Tarski, Rudlof Carnap, W. V. Quine, Carl Hempel, and Nelson Goodman were all in residence. This group held regular private meetings, with Carnap, Tarski, and Quine being the most frequent attendees. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine at Harvard allows the reader to act as a fly on the wall for their conversations. Carnap took detailed notes during his year at Harvard. This book includes both a German transcription of these shorthand notes and an English translation in the appendix section. Carnap’s notes cover a wide range of topics, but surprisingly, the most prominent question is: if the number of physical items in the universe is finite (or possibly finite), what form should scientific discourse, and logic and mathematics in particular, take? This question is closely connected to an abiding philosophical problem, one that is of central philosophical importance to the logical empiricists: what is the relationship between the logico-mathematical realm and the material realm studied by natural science? Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s attempts to answer this question involve a number of issues that remain central to philosophy of logic, mathematics, and science today. This book focuses on three such issues: nominalism, the unity of science, and analyticity. In short, the book reconstructs the lines of argument represented in these Harvard discussions, discusses their historical significance (especially Quine’s break from Carnap), and relates them when possible to contemporary treatments of these issues. Nominalism. The founding document of twentieth-century Anglophone nominalism is Goodman and Quine’s 1947 “Steps Toward a Constructive Nominalism.” In it, the authors acknowledge that their project’s initial impetus was the conversations of 1940-1941 with Carnap and Tarski. Frost-Arnold's exposition focuses upon the rationales given for and against the nominalist program at its inception. Tarski and Quine’s primary motivation for nominalism is that mathematical sentences will be ‘unintelligible’ or meaningless, and thus perniciously metaphysical, if (contra nominalism) their component terms are taken to refer to abstract objects. Their solution is to re-interpret mathematical language so that its terms only refer to concrete entities—and if the number of concreta is finite, then portions of classical mathematics will be considered meaningless. Frost-Arnold then identifies and reconstructs Carnap’s two most forceful responses to Tarski and Quine’s view: (1) all of classical mathematics is meaningful, even if the number of concreta is finite, and (2) nominalist strictures lead to absurd consequences in mathematics and logic. The second is familiar from modern debates over nominalism, and its force is proportional to the strength of one’s commitment to preserving all of classical mathematics. The first, however, has no direct correlate in the modern debate, and turns upon the question of whether Carnap’s technique for partially interpreting a language can confer meaningfulness on the whole language. Finally, the author compares the arguments for and against nominalism found in the discussion notes to the leading arguments in the current nominalist debate: the indispensability argument and the argument from causal theories of reference and knowledge. Analyticity. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s conversations on finitism have a direct connection to the tenability of the analytic-synthetic distinction: under a finitist-nominalist regime, portions of arithmetic—a supposedly analytic enterprise—become empirical. Other portions of the 1940-41 notes address analyticity directly. Interestingly, Tarski’s criticisms are more sustained and pointed than Quine’s. For example, Tarski suggests that Gödel’s first incompleteness theorem furnishes evidence against Carnap’s conception of analyticity. After reconstructing this argument, Frost-Arnold concludes that it does not tell decisively against Carnap—provided that language is not treated fundamentally proof-theoretically. Quine’s points of disagreement with Carnap in the discussion notes are primarily denials of Carnap’s premises without argument. They do, however, allow us new and more precise characterizations of Carnap and Quine’s differences. Finally, the author forwards two historical conjectures concerning the radicalization of Quine’s critique of analyticity in the period between “Truth by Convention” and “Two Dogmas.” First, the finitist conversations could have shown Quine how the apparently analytic sentences of arithmetic could be plausibly construed as synthetic. Second, Carnap’s shift during his semantic period toward intensional analyses of linguistic concepts, including synonymy, perhaps made Quine, an avowed extensionalist, more skeptical of meaning and analyticity. Unity of Science. The unity of science movement originated in Vienna in the 1920s, and figured prominently in the transplantation of logical empiricism into North America in the 1940s. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s search for a total language of science that incorporates mathematical language into that of the natural and social sciences is a clear attempt to unify the language of science. But what motivates the drive for such a unified science? Frost-Arnold locates the answer in the logical empiricists’ antipathy towards speculative metaphysics, in contrast with meaningful scientific claims. I present evidence that, for logical empiricists over several decades, an apparently meaningful assertion or term is metaphysical if and only if that assertion or term cannot be incorporated into a language of unified science. Thus, constructing a single language of science that encompasses the mathematical and natural domains would ensure that mathematical entities are not on par with entelechies and Platonic Forms. The author explores various versions of this criterion for overcoming metaphysics, focusing on Carnap and Neurath. Finally, I consider an obstacle facing their strategy for overcoming metaphysics: there is no effective procedure to show that a given claim or term cannot be incorporated within a language.
Categories: Philosophy

Uncovering Facts and Values Studies in Contemporary Epistemology and Political Philosophy

Uncovering Facts and Values  Studies in Contemporary Epistemology and Political Philosophy

Language and Philosophy, pp. 89–107. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. ... Alfred Tarski Philosophy of Language and Logic. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmilla. Russell, B. (1912). The Problems of Philosophy. London: William and Norgate. Tarski ...

Author: Adrian Kuźniar

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004312654

Category: Philosophy

Page: 376

View: 162

This volume contains new papers on foundational issues in epistemology, ethics and political philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy

Meaning Without Representation

Meaning Without Representation

'Tarski's Theory of Truth'. ... In Unifying the Philosophy of Truth, edited by T. Achourioti, H. Galinon, K. Fujimoto, and J. Martinez-Fernandez. Berlin: Springer. Glanzberg, Michael. ... Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of Language and Logic.

Author: Steven Gross

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198722199

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 376

View: 892

Challenges the idea that representation of how the world is should play a fundamental explanatory role in any explanation of language. Examines deflationary accounts of truth, the role of language in expressing mental states, and the normative and the natural as they relate to issues of representation.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Foundations of Logical Consequence

Foundations of Logical Consequence

Relevant Logic: A Philosophical Interpretation. ... “Review of Etchemendy: the concept of logical consequence” Journal of Symbolic Logic 57:329–32. McGee, Vann. 1992b. ... Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of Language and Logic.

Author: Colin R. Caret

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198715696

Category: Consequentia (Logic)

Page: 357

View: 679

This volume presents new work on a central issue in the philosophy of logic. Leading figures in the field offer ground-breaking insights into topics including the nature of logical consequence; the relation between logic and inference; the relativity of logic; and the structural properties of the consequence relation.
Categories: Consequentia (Logic)

The Oxford Handbook of Truth

The Oxford Handbook of Truth

“Tarski, Truth, and Semantics,” The Philosophical Review 106:533–54. ... “What Languages Have Tarskian Truth Definitions?,” Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 126: 93–113. ... Alfred Tarski: Philosophy of Language and Logic.

Author: Michael Glanzberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191502651

Category: Philosophy

Page: 800

View: 864

Truth is one of the central concepts in philosophy, and has been a perennial subject of study. Michael Glanzberg has brought together 36 leading experts from around the world to produce the definitive guide to philosophical issues to do with truth. They consider how the concept of truth has been understood from antiquity to the present day, surveying major debates about truth during the emergence of analytic philosophy. They offer critical assessments of the standard theories of truth, including the coherence, correspondence, identity, and pragmatist theories. They explore the role of truth in metaphysics, with lively discussion of truthmakers, proposition, determinacy, objectivity, deflationism, fictionalism, relativism, and pluralism. Finally the handbook explores broader applications of truth in philosophy, including ethics, science, and mathematics, and reviews formal work on truth and its application to semantic paradox. This Oxford Handbook will be an invaluable resource across all areas of philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy

Le niewski s Systems of Logic and Foundations of Mathematics

Le  niewski s Systems of Logic and Foundations of Mathematics

With material on his early philosophical views, his contributions to set theory and his work on nominalism and higher-order quantification, this book offers a uniquely expansive critical commentary on one of analytical philosophy’s great ...

Author: Rafal Urbaniak

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783319004822

Category: Science

Page: 229

View: 466

This meticulous critical assessment of the ground-breaking work of philosopher Stanislaw Leśniewski focuses exclusively on primary texts and explores the full range of output by one of the master logicians of the Lvov-Warsaw school. The author’s nuanced survey eschews secondary commentary, analyzing Leśniewski's core philosophical views and evaluating the formulations that were to have such a profound influence on the evolution of mathematical logic. One of the undisputed leaders of the cohort of brilliant logicians that congregated in Poland in the early twentieth century, Leśniewski was a guide and mentor to a generation of celebrated analytical philosophers (Alfred Tarski was his PhD student). His primary achievement was a system of foundational mathematical logic intended as an alternative to the Principia Mathematica of Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell. Its three strands—‘protothetic’, ‘ontology’, and ‘mereology’, are detailed in discrete sections of this volume, alongside a wealth other chapters grouped to provide the fullest possible coverage of Leśniewski’s academic output. With material on his early philosophical views, his contributions to set theory and his work on nominalism and higher-order quantification, this book offers a uniquely expansive critical commentary on one of analytical philosophy’s great pioneers.​
Categories: Science

The Logical Structure of the World

The Logical Structure of the World

Available for the first time in 20 years, here are two important works from the 1920s by the best-known representative of the Vienna Circle.

Author: Rudolf Carnap

Publisher: Open Court Publishing

ISBN: 0812695232

Category: Philosophy

Page: 364

View: 786

Available for the first time in 20 years, here are two important works from the 1920s by the best-known representative of the Vienna Circle. In The Logical Structure of the World, Carnap adopts the position of ?methodological solipsism” and shows that it is possible to describe the world from the immediate data of experience. In his Pseudoproblems in Philosophy, he asserts that many philosophical problems are meaningless.
Categories: Philosophy

Russell s Philosophy of Logical Analysis 1897 1905

Russell s Philosophy of Logical Analysis  1897 1905

History of Analytic Philosophy Series Editor: Michael Beaney, University of York, UK Titles include: Stewart ... ON ABSOLUTE AND RELATIVE TRUTH Douglas Patterson ALFRED TARSKI Philosophy of Language and Logic Erich Reck (editor) THE ...

Author: J. Galaugher

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137302076

Category: Philosophy

Page: 218

View: 774

This systematic and historical treatment of Russell's contributions to analytic philosophy, from his embrace of analysis in 1898 to his landmark theory of descriptions in 1905, draws important connections between his philosophically motivated conception of analysis and the technical apparatus he devised to facilitate analyses in mathematics
Categories: Philosophy

Wittgenstein on Logic as the Method of Philosophy

Wittgenstein on Logic as the Method of Philosophy

Quine, W. V. O. Philosophy of Logic. Second Edition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1986. Patterson, Douglas. Alfred Tarski: The Philosophy of Language and Logic. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Pears, David.

Author: Oskari Kuusela

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192565310

Category: Philosophy

Page: 312

View: 543

In Wittgenstein on Logic as the Method of Philosophy, Oskari Kuusela examines Wittgenstein's early and late philosophies of logic, situating their philosophical significance in early and middle analytic philosophy with particular reference to Frege, Russell, Carnap, and Strawson. He argues that not only the early but also the later Wittgenstein sought to further develop the logical-philosophical approaches of his contemporaries. Throughout his career Wittgenstein's aim was to resolve problems with and address the limitations of Frege's and Russell's accounts of logic and their logical methodologies so as to achieve the philosophical progress that originally motivated the logical-philosophical approach. By re-examining the roots and development of analytic philosophy, Kuusela seeks to open up covered up paths for the further development of analytic philosophy. Offering a novel interpretation of the philosopher, he explains how Wittgenstein extends logical methodology beyond calculus-based logical methods and how his novel account of the status of logic enables one to do justice to the complexity and richness of language use and thought while retaining rigour and ideals of logic such as simplicity and exactness. In addition, this volume outlines the new kind of non-empiricist naturalism developed in Wittgenstein's later work and explaining how his account of logic can be used to dissolve the long-standing methodological dispute between the ideal and ordinary language schools of analytic philosophy. It is of interest to scholars, researchers, and advance students of philosophy interested in engaging with a number of scholarly debates.
Categories: Philosophy