Curating Contemporary Music Festivals

Curating Contemporary Music Festivals

A New Perspective on Music's Mediation Brandon Farnsworth. in particular the perhaps best-known practitioner of this approach to exhibitionmaking, Harald Szeemann. As has been shown in section 2.3.1, Szeemann was one of a group of ...

Author: Brandon Farnsworth

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 9783839452431

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 326

View: 198

Contemporary music, like other arts, is dealing with the rise of »curators« laying claim to everything from festivals to playlists - but what are they and what do they do anyway? Drawing from backgrounds ranging from curatorial studies to festival studies and musicology, Brandon Farnsworth lays out a theory for understanding curatorial practices in contemporary music, and how they could be a solution to the field's diminishing social relevance. The volume focuses on two case studies, the Munich Biennale for New Music Theatre, and the Maerzmusik Festival at the Berliner Festspiele, putting them in a transdisciplinary history of curatorial practice, and showing what music curatorial practice can be.
Categories: Business & Economics

Contemporary Musical Expressions in Canada

Contemporary Musical Expressions in Canada

Key Sources on Ethnomusicology in Canada Perhaps the most comprehensive survey of music cultures and ethnomusicological research trends in Canada is the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: The United States and Canada, edited by Ellen ...

Author: Anna Hoefnagels

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228000150

Category: Music

Page: 536

View: 981

Music and dance in Canada today are diverse and expansive, reflecting histories of travel, exchange, and interpretation and challenging conceptions of expressive culture that are bounded and static. Reflecting current trends in ethnomusicology, Contemporary Musical Expressions in Canada examines cultural continuity, disjuncture, intersection, and interplay in music and dance across the country. Essays reconsider conceptual frameworks through which cultural forms are viewed, critique policies meant to encourage crosscultural sharing, and address ways in which traditional forms of expression have changed to reflect new contexts and audiences. From North Indian kathak dance, Chinese lion dance, early Toronto hip hop, and contemporary cantor practices within the Byzantine Ukrainian Church in Canada to folk music performances in twentieth-century Quebec, Gaelic milling songs in Cape Breton, and Mennonite songs in rural Manitoba, this collection offers detailed portraits of contemporary music practices and how they engage with diverse cultural expressions and identities. At a historical moment when identity politics, multiculturalism, diversity, immigration, and border crossings are debated around the world, Contemporary Musical Expressions in Canada demonstrates the many ways that music and dance practices in Canada engage with these broader global processes. Contributors include Rebecca Draisey-Collishaw (Queen's University), Meghan Forsyth (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Monique Giroux (University of Lethbridge), Ian Hayes (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Anna Hoefnagels (Carleton University), Judith Klassen (Canadian Museum of History), Chris McDonald (Cape Breton University), Colin McGuire (University College Cork), Marcia Ostashewski (Cape Breton University), Laura Risk (McGill University), Neil Scobie (University Western Ontario), Gordon Smith (Queen's University), Heather Sparling (Cape Breton University), Jesse Stewart (Carleton University), Janice Esther Tulk (Cape Breton University), Margaret Walker (Queen's University), and Louise Wrazen (York University).
Categories: Music

Saving Abstraction

Saving Abstraction

Patrons and musicians gave little support to contemporary music in the years 1933–1942. ... Ernest Bloch).64 Other concerts featured a survey of contemporary art song from Strauss and Mahler and a concert devoted to French music.

Author: Ryan Dohoney

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190948597

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 738

Saving Abstraction: Morton Feldman, the de Menils, and the Rothko Chapel tells the story of the 1972 premier of Morton Feldman's music for the Rothko Chapel in Houston. Built in 1971 for "people of all faiths or none," the chapel houses 14 monumental paintings by famed abstract expressionist Mark Rothko, who had committed suicide only one year earlier. Upon its opening, visitors' responses to the chapel ranged from spiritual succor to abject tragedy--the latter being closest to Rothko's intentions. However the chapel's founders--art collectors and philanthropists Dominique and John de Menil--opened the space to provide an ecumenically and spiritually affirming environment that spoke to their avant-garde approach to Catholicism. A year after the chapel opened, Morton Feldman's musical work Rothko Chapel proved essential to correcting the unintentionally grave atmosphere of the de Menil's chapel, translating Rothko's existential dread into sacred ecumenism for visitors. Author Ryan Dohoney reconstructs the network of artists, musicians, and patrons who collaborated on the premier of Feldman's music for the space, and documents the ways collaborators struggled over fundamental questions about the emotional efficacy of art and its potential translation into religious feeling. Rather than frame the debate as a conflict of art versus religion, Dohoney argues that the popular claim of modernism's autonomy from religion has been overstated and that the two have been continually intertwined in an agonistic tension that animates many 20th-century artistic collaborations.
Categories: Music

Rethinking Prokofiev

Rethinking Prokofiev

Composers” of his Survey of Contemporary Music (1924), Cecil Gray concluded that Prokofiev “is quite clever and ... Like others, Gray was critical of the composer's musical language, which he considered to be an “empty” modernist style ...

Author: Rita McAllister

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190670795

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 910

Among major 20th-century composers whose music is poorly understood, Sergei Prokofiev stands out conspicuously. The turbulent times in which Prokofiev lived and the chronology of his travels-he left Russia in the wake of Revolution, and returned at the height of the Stalinist purges-have caused unusually polarized appraisals of his music. While individual, distinctive, and instantly recognizable, Prokofiev's music was also idiosyncratically tonal in an age when tonality was largely passé. Prokofiev's output therefore has been largely elusive and difficult to assess against contemporary trends. More than sixty years after the composer's death, editors Rita McAllister and Christina Guillaumier offer Rethinking Prokofiev as an assessment that redresses this enigmatic composer's legacy. Often more political than artistic, these appraisals have depended not only upon the date of publication but also the geographical location of the writer. Commissioned from some of the most distinguished and rising scholars in the field, this collection highlights the background and context of Prokofiev's work. Contributors delve into the composer's relationship to nineteenth-century Russian traditions, Silver-Age and Symbolist composers and poets, the culture of Paris in the 1920s and '30s, and to his later Soviet colleagues and younger contemporaries. They also investigate his reception in the West, his return to Russia, and the effect of his music on contemporary popular culture. Still, the main focus of the book is on the music itself: his early, experimental piano and vocal works, as well as his piano concertos, operas, film scores, early ballets, and late symphonies. Through an empirical examination of his characteristic harmonies, melodies, cadences, and musical gestures-and through an analysis of the newly uncovered contents of his sketch-books-contributors reveal much of what makes Prokofiev an idiosyncratic genius and his music intriguing, often dramatic, and almost always beguiling.
Categories: Music

Space and Spatialization in Contemporary Music History and Analysis Ideas and Implementations

Space and Spatialization in Contemporary Music  History and Analysis  Ideas and Implementations

Finally (in section 2.4), I discuss and examplify the shift in the meaning of "musical space" towards the physical-acoustic-perceptual space. This chapter, a comprehensive historical survey of the idea of space in music, ...

Author: Maria Anna Harley

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780996398169

Category:

Page: 483

View: 285

This dissertation presents the history of space in the musical thought of the 20th­ century (from Kurth to Clifton, from Varese to Xenakis) and outlines the development of spatialization in the theory and practice of contemporary music (after 1950). The text emphasizes perceptual and temporal aspects of musical spatiality, thus reflecting the close connection of space and time in human experience. A new definition of spatialization draws from Ingarden's notion of the musical work; a typology of spatial designs embraces music for different acoustic environments, movements of performers and audiences, various positions of musicians in space, etc. The study of spatialization includes a survey of the composers's writings (lves, Boulez, Stockhausen, Cage, etc.) and an examination of their works. The final part presents three unique approaches to spatialization: Brant's simultaneity of sound layers, Xenakis's movement of sound, and Schafer's music of ritual and soundscape.
Categories:

Opera in the Jazz Age

Opera in the Jazz Age

Cecil Gray wrote in his study of contemporary composers that 'No living composer is more despised and execrated by the leaders of musical opinion today in every country'. Cecil Gray, A Survey of Contemporary Music, 2nd edn (London: ...

Author: Alexandra Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190912680

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 723

Jazz, the Charleston, nightclubs, cocktails, cinema, and musical theatre: 1920s British nightlife was vibrant and exhilarating. But where did opera fit into this fashionable new entertainment world? Opera in the Jazz Age: Cultural Politics in 1920s Britain explores the interaction between opera and popular culture at a key historical moment when there was a growing imperative to categorize art forms as "highbrow," "middlebrow," or "lowbrow." Literary studies of the so-called "battle of the brows" have been numerous, but this is the first book to consider the place of opera in interwar debates about high and low culture. This study by Alexandra Wilson argues that opera was extremely difficult to pigeonhole: although some contemporary commentators believed it to be too highbrow, others thought it not highbrow enough. Opera in the Jazz Age paints a lively and engaging picture of 1920s operatic culture, and introduces a charismatic cast of early twentieth-century critics, conductors, and celebrity singers. Opera was performed during this period to socially mixed audiences in a variety of spaces beyond the conventional opera house: music halls, cinemas, cafés and schools. Performance and production standards were not always high - often quite the reverse - but opera-going was evidently great fun. Office boys whistled operatic tunes they had heard on the gramophone and there was a genuine sense that opera was for everyone. In this provocative and timely study, Wilson considers how the opera debate of the 1920s continues to shape the ways in which we discuss the art form, and draws connections between the battle of the brows and present-day discussions about elitism. The book makes a major contribution to our understanding of the cultural politics of twentieth-century Britain and is essential reading for anybody interested in the history of opera, the battle of the brows, or simply the perennially fascinating decade that was the 1920s.
Categories: Music

Delius and the Sound of Place

Delius and the Sound of Place

Delius's permanent residence in Grez coincided with a significant change of emphasis in his music, in which images of countryside and village ... Cecil Gray, A Survey of Contemporary Music (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1924), 73.

Author: Daniel M. Grimley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108470391

Category: Music

Page: 337

View: 850

Offers a radical and interdisciplinary analysis that will transform readers' understanding of this deeply compelling early twentieth-century composer.
Categories: Music

Imperialism And Music

Imperialism And Music

66 Mackenzie , My Record of Music , p . 83 . 67 Cecil Gray , A Survey of Contemporary Music , London : Oxford University Press , 1924 , p . 78 . 68 Ibid . , pp . 79-81 . 69 Cecil Gray , Musical Chairs , London : Hogarth Press ...

Author: Jeffrey Richards

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719045061

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 803

This is the first book to consider the relationship between British imperialism and music. With its unique ability to stimulate the emotions and to create mental images, music was used to dramatize, illustrate, and reinforce the components of the ideological cluster that constituted British imperialism in its heyday: patriotism, monarchism, hero-worship, Protestantism, racialism, and chivalry. It was also used to emphasize the inclusiveness of Britain by stressing the contributions of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland to the imperial project.
Categories: History

Gustav Holst

Gustav Holst

Includes musical examples and a facsimile of a drawing of Holst by William Rothenstein. Holst in context Monographs ... Music in England, 1885–1920: As Recounted in Hazell's Annual. ... In A Survey of Contemporary Music, pp. 240–253.

Author: Mary Christison Huismann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135845278

Category: Music

Page: 277

View: 351

First published in 2011. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Music