A Spy Named Orphan

A Spy Named Orphan

Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, A Spy Named Orphan now tells this story for the first time in full, revealing the character and devastating impact of perhaps the most dangerous Soviet agent of the twentieth century.

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1784703575

Category:

Page: 352

View: 644

Donald Maclean was a star diplomat, an establishment insider and a keeper of some of the West's greatest secrets. He was also a Russian spy, driven by passionately held beliefs, whose betrayal and defection to Moscow reverberated for decades.Christened 'Orphan? by his Russian recruiter, Maclean was the perfect spy and Britain?s most gifted traitor. But as he leaked huge amounts of top-secret intelligence, an international code-breaking operation was rapidly closing in on him. Moments before he was unmasked, Maclean vanished.Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, Roland Philipps now tells this story for the first time in full. He unravels Maclean?s character and contradictions- a childhood that was simultaneously liberal and austere; a Cambridge education mixing in Communist circles; a polished diplomat with a tendency to wild binges; a marriage complicated by secrets; an accelerated rise through the Foreign Office and, above all, a gift for deception. Taking us back to the golden age of espionage, A Spy Named Orphanreveals the impact of one of the most dangerous and enigmatic Soviet agents of the twentieth century, whose actions heightened the tensions of the Cold War.'This biography first grips and then lingers long in the mind. It is a page-turner of the most empathetic kind? Guardian'Superb? William Boyd
Categories:

A Spy Named Orphan

A Spy Named Orphan

The Enigma of Donald Maclean Roland Philipps. Party half a century earlier. In her eyes, constancy was the key to both Donalds. Ian Maclean was born in 1908, followed by Andrew in 1910, then Donald Duart (known by his parents as ...

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473545106

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 105

Donald Maclean was a star diplomat, an establishment insider and a keeper of some of the West’s greatest secrets. He was also a Russian spy... Codenamed ‘Orphan’ by his Russian recruiter, Maclean was Britain’s most gifted traitor. But as he leaked huge amounts of top-secret intelligence, an international code-breaking operation was rapidly closing in on him. Moments before he was unmasked, Maclean escaped to Moscow. Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, A Spy Named Orphan now tells this story for the first time in full, revealing the character and devastating impact of perhaps the most dangerous Soviet agent of the twentieth century. ‘Superb’ William Boyd ‘Fascinating... An exceptional story of espionage and betrayal, thrillingly told’ Philippe Sands ‘A cracking story... Impressively researched’ Sunday Times ‘Philipps makes the story and the slow uncovering of [Maclean’s] treachery a gripping narrative’ Alan Bennett
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Cold War The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection 5 volumes

The Cold War  The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection  5 volumes

Newton, Verne W. The Cambridge Spies: The Untold Story of McLean, Philby, and Burgess in America. Lanham, MD: Madison Books, 1991. Philipps, Roland. A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean. New York: Norton, 2018.

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440860768

Category: History

Page: 2181

View: 274

This sweeping reference work covers every aspect of the Cold War, from its ignition in the ashes of World War II, through the Berlin Wall and the Cuban Missile Crisis, to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The Cold War superpower face-off between the Soviet Union and the United States dominated international affairs in the second half of the 20th century and still reverberates around the world today. This comprehensive and insightful multivolume set provides authoritative entries on all aspects of this world-changing event, including wars, new military technologies, diplomatic initiatives, espionage activities, important individuals and organizations, economic developments, societal and cultural events, and more. This expansive coverage provides readers with the necessary context to understand the many facets of this complex conflict. The work begins with a preface and introduction and then offers illuminating introductory essays on the origins and course of the Cold War, which are followed by some 1,500 entries on key individuals, wars, battles, weapons systems, diplomacy, politics, economics, and art and culture. Each entry has cross-references and a list of books for further reading. The text includes more than 100 key primary source documents, a detailed chronology, a glossary, and a selective bibliography. Numerous illustrations and maps are inset throughout to provide additional context to the material. Includes more than 1,500 entries covering all facets of the Cold War from its origins to its aftermath, including all political, diplomatic, military, social, economic, and cultural aspects Incorporates the scholarship of more than 200 internationally recognized contributors from around the world, many writing about events and issues from the perspective of their country of origin Offers more than 100 original documents—a collection that draws heavily on material from archives in China, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union Provides hundreds of powerful images and dozens of informative maps detailing specific military conflicts and movements of various groups Includes a detailed chronology of important events that occurred before, during, and after the Cold War
Categories: History

Agent Moli re

Agent Moli  re

11 Cairncross, The Enigma Spy, p. 115. 12 Graham Greene, Ways of Escape (The Bodley Head, 1980), p. 34. 13 West and Tsarev The Crown Jewels, p. 221. 14 Ibid., pp. 220–1. 15 Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean, p.

Author: Geoff Andrews

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781838606763

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 965

The Cambridge Spies continue to fascinate - but one of them, John Cairncross, has always been more of an enigma than the others. He worked alone and was driven by his hostility to Fascism rather than to the promotion of Communism. During his war-time work at Bletchley Park, he passed documents to the Soviets which went on to influence the Battle of Kursk. Now, Geoff Andrews has access to the Cairncross papers and secrets, and has spoken to friends, relatives and former colleagues. A complex individual emerges – a scholar as well as a spy – whose motivations have often been misunderstood. After his resignation from the Civil Service, Cairncross moved to Italy and here he rebuilt his life as a foreign correspondent, editor and university professor. This gave him new circles and friendships – which included the writer Graham Greene – while he always lived with the fear that his earlier espionage would come to light. The full account of Cairncross's spying, his confession and his dramatic public exposure as the 'fifth man' will be told here for the first time, while also unveiling the story of his post-espionage life.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Researching National Security Intelligence

Researching National Security Intelligence

For example, the Romanian Orthodox Church's efforts to prevent the release of the names of priests identified as ... The Spy Who Knew Everyone (London: Biteback, 2016); Roland Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean ...

Author: Stephen Coulthart

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 9781626167049

Category: Political Science

Page: 270

View: 194

Researchers in the rapidly growing field of intelligence studies face unique and difficult challenges ranging from finding and accessing data on secret activities, to sorting through the politics of intelligence successes and failures, to making sense of complex socio-organizational or psychological phenomena. The contributing authors to Researching National Security Intelligence survey the state of the field and demonstrate how incorporating multiple disciplines helps to generate high-quality, policy-relevant research. Following this approach, the volume provides a conceptual, empirical, and methodological toolkit for scholars and students informed by many disciplines: history, political science, public administration, psychology, communications, and journalism. This collection of essays written by an international group of scholars and practitioners propels intelligence studies forward by demonstrating its growing depth, by suggesting new pathways to the creation of knowledge, and by identifying how scholarship can enhance practice and accountability.
Categories: Political Science

Victoire

Victoire

About the Author Roland Philipps was a leading publisher for many years. His first book, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean, was published in 2018 to wide acclaim. Also by Roland Philipps A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma.

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473567955

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 189

'The wartime spy career of Mathilde Carré - aka "the Cat" and "Agent Victoire" - is so extraordinary it almost defies belief' The Times An exhilarating true story of espionage, resistance, and one of WW2's most charismatic double-agents. Occupied Paris, 1940. A woman in a red hat and a black fur coat hurries down a side-street. She is Mathilde Carré, codenamed 'the Cat', later known as Agent Victoire - charismatic, daring and a spy. These are the darkest days for France, yet Mathilde is driven by a sense of destiny that she will be her nation's saviour. Soon, she is at the centre of the first great Allied intelligence network of the Second World War. But as Roland Philipps shows in this extraordinary account of her life, when the Germans close in, Mathilde makes a desperate and dangerous compromise. Nobody - not her German handler, nor the Resistance and the British - can be certain where her allegiances now lie... 'A truly astonishing story, meticulously and brilliantly told' Philippe Sands, author of The Ratline 'Gripping... Enough plot twists and moral ambiguity to satisfy any spy novelist' Spectator
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Last Cambridge Spy

The Last Cambridge Spy

Perry, R., The Last of the Cold War Spies: The Life of Michael Straight, The Only American in Britain's Cambridge Spy Ring (Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press, 2005). Philipps, R., A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean (London: The ...

Author: Chris Smith

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780750991728

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 951

JOHN CAIRNCROSS was among the most damaging spies of the twentieth century. A member of the infamous Cambridge Ring of Five, he leaked highly sensitive documents from Bletchley Park, MI6 and the Treasury to the Soviet Union – including the first atomic secrets and raw decrypts from Enigma and Tunny that influenced the outcome of the Battle of Kursk. In 2014, Cairncross appeared as a secondary, though key, character in the biopic of Alan Turing’s life, The Imitation Game. While the other members of the Cambridge Ring of Five have been the subject of extensive biographical study, Cairncross has largely been overlooked by both academic and popular writers. Despite clear interest, he has remained a mystery – until now. The Last Cambridge Spy is the first ever biography of John Cairncross, using newly released material to tell the story of his life and espionage.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Secret City

Secret City

Newton, Verne W. The Cambridge Spies: The Untold Story of Maclean, Philby, and Burgess in America. Lanham, MD: Madison Books, 1991. ... O'Donnell, Patrick K. Operatives, Spies, ... A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean.

Author: James Kirchick

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781627792332

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 603

The New York Times Bestseller "Not since Robert Caro’s Years of Lyndon Johnson have I been so riveted by a work of history. Secret City is not gay history. It is American history.” —George Stephanopoulos Washington, D.C., has always been a city of secrets. Few have been more dramatic than the ones revealed in James Kirchick’s Secret City. For decades, the specter of homosexuality haunted Washington. The mere suggestion that a person might be gay destroyed reputations, ended careers, and ruined lives. At the height of the Cold War, fear of homosexuality became intertwined with the growing threat of international communism, leading to a purge of gay men and lesbians from the federal government. In the fevered atmosphere of political Washington, the secret “too loathsome to mention” held enormous, terrifying power. Utilizing thousands of pages of declassified documents, interviews with over one hundred people, and material unearthed from presidential libraries and archives around the country, Secret City is a chronicle of American politics like no other. Beginning with the tragic story of Sumner Welles, Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s brilliant diplomatic advisor and the man at the center of “the greatest national scandal since the existence of the United States,” James Kirchick illuminates how homosexuality shaped each successive presidential administration through the end of the twentieth century. Cultural and political anxiety over gay people sparked a decades-long witch hunt, impacting everything from the rivalry between the CIA and the FBI to the ascent of Joseph McCarthy, the struggle for Black civil rights, and the rise of the conservative movement. Among other revelations, Kirchick tells of the World War II–era gay spymaster who pioneered seduction as a tool of American espionage, the devoted aide whom Lyndon Johnson treated as a son yet abandoned once his homosexuality was discovered, and how allegations of a “homosexual ring” controlling Ronald Reagan nearly derailed his 1980 election victory. Magisterial in scope and intimate in detail, Secret City will forever transform our understanding of American history.
Categories: History

Chums

Chums

Four of them were at Trinity College, with Maclean next door at Trinity Hall. ... Roland Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean (The Bodley Head, London, 2018), retrieved through Google Books. 11.

Author: Simon Kuper

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781782838180

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 649

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Power. Privilege. Parties. It's a very small world at the top. 'A searing onslaught on the smirking Oxford insinuation that politics is all just a game. It isn't. It matters' Matthew Parris 'A sparkling firework of a book' Lynn Barber, Spectator 'Exquisite and depressing in equal measure' Matthew Syed, Sunday Times Boris Johnson, Michael Gove, David Cameron, George Osborne, Theresa May, Dominic Cummings, Daniel Hannan, Jacob Rees-Mogg: Whitehall is swarming with old Oxonians. They debated each other in tutorials, ran against each other in student elections, and attended the same balls and black tie dinners. They aren't just colleagues - they are peers, rivals, friends. And, when they walked out of the world of student debates onto the national stage, they brought their university politics with them. Eleven of the fifteen postwar British prime ministers went to Oxford. In Chums, Simon Kuper traces how the rarefied and privileged atmosphere of this narrowest of talent pools - and the friendships and worldviews it created - shaped modern Britain. A damning look at the university clique-turned-Commons majority that will blow the doors of Westminster wide open and change the way you look at our democracy forever.
Categories: Political Science

Witchfinder

Witchfinder

... Spy Master: The Life of Britain's Most Decorated Cold War Spy and Head of MI6, Sir Maurice Oldfield; Kim Philby, My Silent War: The Autobiography of a Spy; Roland Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean; ...

Author: Andrew Williams

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473631779

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 837

'Rich, densely plotted... If le Carré needs a successor, Williams has all the equipment for the role.' Times Literary Supplement Books of the Year 'The most authentic spy novel ever written [...] an utterly fascinating account of a very dangerous time in British history when elements of the Secret State were out of control' Edward Wilson 'Gripped me, not just because of its crisp writing but because of its skilful blending of history and imagination... A clever cautionary tale' The Tablet London 1963. The Beatles, Carnaby Street, mini skirts. But the new mood hasn't reached the drab and fearful corridors of MI5 and MI6. Many agents joined the secret service to fight the Nazis. Now they are locked in a Cold War against the Russians. And some of them are traitors. The service has been shaken to its core by the high-profile defections of Cambridge-educated spies Burgess, MacLean and now Philby. Appalled at such flagrant breaches of British security, the Americans are demanding a rigorous review. Harry Vaughan is brought back from Vienna to be part of it. The Chief asks him to join two investigators - Arthur Martin and Peter Wright - who are determined to clean out the stables, and the first target of their suspicions is the Deputy Director General of MI5, Graham Mitchell. Harry slips back into a relationship with an old flame, Elsa, and joins the hunt - somewhat reluctantly. He is sceptical of the case against Mitchell and wary of the messianic fervour of the two spycatchers. But the further the investigation goes - and the deeper his commitment to Elsa becomes - the greater the sense of paranoia and distrust that spreads through the 'wilderness of mirrors' that is the secret service. The only certainty is that no one is above suspicion. Including Harry Vaughan. *** 'Every bit as cynical in tone as Mick Herron's Slough House mob' Irish Times 'If a good spy novel needs anything, it's uncertainty, a hall of mirrors; and Witchfinder delivers it in spades. Great stuff' Dominick Donald, author of Breathe 'One of Britain's most accomplished thriller writers' Daily Mail 'Williams is an accomplished thriller writer and this may be his best book yet. London in the 1960s, its smoky pubs, damp streets and crackle of sexual liberation is so well portrayed that reading Witchfinder is almost like time travel. Williams blends fact and fiction to make a captivating read.' Financial Times
Categories: Fiction