A Spy Named Orphan

A Spy Named Orphan

Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, A Spy Named Orphan now tells this story for the first time in full, revealing the character and devastating impact of perhaps the most dangerous Soviet agent of the twentieth century. ...

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473545106

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 490

Donald Maclean was a star diplomat, an establishment insider and a keeper of some of the West’s greatest secrets. He was also a Russian spy... Codenamed ‘Orphan’ by his Russian recruiter, Maclean was Britain’s most gifted traitor. But as he leaked huge amounts of top-secret intelligence, an international code-breaking operation was rapidly closing in on him. Moments before he was unmasked, Maclean escaped to Moscow. Drawing on a wealth of previously classified material, A Spy Named Orphan now tells this story for the first time in full, revealing the character and devastating impact of perhaps the most dangerous Soviet agent of the twentieth century. ‘Superb’ William Boyd ‘Fascinating... An exceptional story of espionage and betrayal, thrillingly told’ Philippe Sands ‘A cracking story... Impressively researched’ Sunday Times ‘Philipps makes the story and the slow uncovering of [Maclean’s] treachery a gripping narrative’ Alan Bennett
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Victoire

Victoire

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Arrow

ISBN: 1529111293

Category:

Page: 352

View: 821

Categories:

The Cold War The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection 5 volumes

The Cold War  The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection  5 volumes

Newton, Verne W. The Cambridge Spies: The Untold Story of McLean, Philby, and Burgess in America. Lanham, MD: Madison Books, 1991. Philipps, Roland. A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean. New York: Norton, 2018.

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440860768

Category: History

Page: 2181

View: 475

This sweeping reference work covers every aspect of the Cold War, from its ignition in the ashes of World War II, through the Berlin Wall and the Cuban Missile Crisis, to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The Cold War superpower face-off between the Soviet Union and the United States dominated international affairs in the second half of the 20th century and still reverberates around the world today. This comprehensive and insightful multivolume set provides authoritative entries on all aspects of this world-changing event, including wars, new military technologies, diplomatic initiatives, espionage activities, important individuals and organizations, economic developments, societal and cultural events, and more. This expansive coverage provides readers with the necessary context to understand the many facets of this complex conflict. The work begins with a preface and introduction and then offers illuminating introductory essays on the origins and course of the Cold War, which are followed by some 1,500 entries on key individuals, wars, battles, weapons systems, diplomacy, politics, economics, and art and culture. Each entry has cross-references and a list of books for further reading. The text includes more than 100 key primary source documents, a detailed chronology, a glossary, and a selective bibliography. Numerous illustrations and maps are inset throughout to provide additional context to the material. Includes more than 1,500 entries covering all facets of the Cold War from its origins to its aftermath, including all political, diplomatic, military, social, economic, and cultural aspects Incorporates the scholarship of more than 200 internationally recognized contributors from around the world, many writing about events and issues from the perspective of their country of origin Offers more than 100 original documents—a collection that draws heavily on material from archives in China, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union Provides hundreds of powerful images and dozens of informative maps detailing specific military conflicts and movements of various groups Includes a detailed chronology of important events that occurred before, during, and after the Cold War
Categories: History

Agent Moli re

Agent Moli  re

11 Cairncross, The Enigma Spy, p. 115. 12 Graham Greene, Ways of Escape (The Bodley Head, 1980), p. 34. 13 West and Tsarev The Crown Jewels, p. 221. 14 Ibid., pp. 220–1. 15 Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean, p.

Author: Geoff Andrews

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781838606763

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 391

The Cambridge Spies continue to fascinate - but one of them, John Cairncross, has always been more of an enigma than the others. He worked alone and was driven by his hostility to Fascism rather than to the promotion of Communism. During his war-time work at Bletchley Park, he passed documents to the Soviets which went on to influence the Battle of Kursk. Now, Geoff Andrews has access to the Cairncross papers and secrets, and has spoken to friends, relatives and former colleagues. A complex individual emerges – a scholar as well as a spy – whose motivations have often been misunderstood. After his resignation from the Civil Service, Cairncross moved to Italy and here he rebuilt his life as a foreign correspondent, editor and university professor. This gave him new circles and friendships – which included the writer Graham Greene – while he always lived with the fear that his earlier espionage would come to light. The full account of Cairncross's spying, his confession and his dramatic public exposure as the 'fifth man' will be told here for the first time, while also unveiling the story of his post-espionage life.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Victoire

Victoire

About the Author Roland Philipps was a leading publisher for many years. His first book, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean, was published in 2018 to wide acclaim. Also by Roland Philipps A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma.

Author: Roland Philipps

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473567955

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 102

'The wartime spy career of Mathilde Carré - aka "the Cat" and "Agent Victoire" - is so extraordinary it almost defies belief' The Times 'A truly astonishing story, meticulously and brilliantly told' Philippe Sands, author of The Ratline RESISTANCE, COLLABORATION AND BETRAYAL Occupied Paris, 1940. A woman in a red hat and a black fur coat hurries down a side-street. She is Mathilde Carré, codenamed 'the Cat', later known as Agent Victoire. She is charismatic, daring, and a spy; her story is one of heroism and survival against the odds. These are the darkest days for France, half-occupied by Nazi Germany, half-governed by the collaborationist Vichy regime; and dark days for Britain, isolated and under threat of invasion. Yet Mathilde is driven by a sense of destiny that she will be her nation's saviour. With little training or support, Mathilde and her Polish collaborator, Roman Czerniawski, create a huge web of agents in a matter of weeks to form the first great Allied intelligence network of the Second World War. They risk torture and execution to deliver their coded reports, London's sole source of reliable information about the Occupation. But the 'Big Network' is threatened at every turn and when the Germans inevitably close in Mathilde makes a desperate compromise. She enters a hall of mirrors in which any bond is doubtful and every action could be fatal. Nobody is certain where her allegiances lie - her German handler, the founder of the Resistance she ensnares and the British who eventually succeed in extracting her on a fast boat all have to make their own calculations. Is she a double, possibly even a triple agent, and, if so, can she be trusted to turn yet again? Victoire is the story of a passionate, courageous spy but also of a fragile hero, desperate to belong - a portrait of patriotism and survival in momentous times. Drawing on a wide range of new and first-hand material, Roland Philipps has written a dazzling tale of audacity, complicity and the choices made in wartime.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Researching National Security Intelligence

Researching National Security Intelligence

For example, the Romanian Orthodox Church's efforts to prevent the release of the names of priests identified as ... The Spy Who Knew Everyone (London: Biteback, 2016); Roland Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean ...

Author: Stephen Coulthart

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 9781626167049

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 997

Researchers in the rapidly growing field of intelligence studies face unique and difficult challenges ranging from finding and accessing data on secret activities, to sorting through the politics of intelligence successes and failures, to making sense of complex socio-organizational or psychological phenomena. The contributing authors to Researching National Security Intelligence survey the state of the field and demonstrate how incorporating multiple disciplines helps to generate high-quality, policy-relevant research. Following this approach, the volume provides a conceptual, empirical, and methodological toolkit for scholars and students informed by many disciplines: history, political science, public administration, psychology, communications, and journalism. This collection of essays written by an international group of scholars and practitioners propels intelligence studies forward by demonstrating its growing depth, by suggesting new pathways to the creation of knowledge, and by identifying how scholarship can enhance practice and accountability.
Categories: Political Science

The Last Cambridge Spy

The Last Cambridge Spy

Perry, R., The Last of the Cold War Spies: The Life of Michael Straight, The Only American in Britain's Cambridge Spy Ring (Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press, 2005). Philipps, R., A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean (London: The ...

Author: Chris Smith

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780750991728

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 174

JOHN CAIRNCROSS was among the most damaging spies of the twentieth century. A member of the infamous Cambridge Ring of Five, he leaked highly sensitive documents from Bletchley Park, MI6 and the Treasury to the Soviet Union – including the first atomic secrets and raw decrypts from Enigma and Tunny that influenced the outcome of the Battle of Kursk. In 2014, Cairncross appeared as a secondary, though key, character in the biopic of Alan Turing’s life, The Imitation Game. While the other members of the Cambridge Ring of Five have been the subject of extensive biographical study, Cairncross has largely been overlooked by both academic and popular writers. Despite clear interest, he has remained a mystery – until now. The Last Cambridge Spy is the first ever biography of John Cairncross, using newly released material to tell the story of his life and espionage.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Witchfinder

Witchfinder

... Spy Master: The Life of Britain's Most Decorated Cold War Spy and Head of MI6, Sir Maurice Oldfield; Kim Philby, My Silent War: The Autobiography of a Spy; Roland Philipps, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean; ...

Author: Andrew Williams

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473631779

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 950

'Rich, densely plotted... If le Carré needs a successor, Williams has all the equipment for the role.' Times Literary Supplement Books of the Year 'The most authentic spy novel ever written [...] an utterly fascinating account of a very dangerous time in British history when elements of the Secret State were out of control' Edward Wilson 'Gripped me, not just because of its crisp writing but because of its skilful blending of history and imagination... A clever cautionary tale' The Tablet London 1963. The Beatles, Carnaby Street, mini skirts. But the new mood hasn't reached the drab and fearful corridors of MI5 and MI6. Many agents joined the secret service to fight the Nazis. Now they are locked in a Cold War against the Russians. And some of them are traitors. The service has been shaken to its core by the high-profile defections of Cambridge-educated spies Burgess, MacLean and now Philby. Appalled at such flagrant breaches of British security, the Americans are demanding a rigorous review. Harry Vaughan is brought back from Vienna to be part of it. The Chief asks him to join two investigators - Arthur Martin and Peter Wright - who are determined to clean out the stables, and the first target of their suspicions is the Deputy Director General of MI5, Graham Mitchell. Harry slips back into a relationship with an old flame, Elsa, and joins the hunt - somewhat reluctantly. He is sceptical of the case against Mitchell and wary of the messianic fervour of the two spycatchers. But the further the investigation goes - and the deeper his commitment to Elsa becomes - the greater the sense of paranoia and distrust that spreads through the 'wilderness of mirrors' that is the secret service. The only certainty is that no one is above suspicion. Including Harry Vaughan. *** 'Every bit as cynical in tone as Mick Herron's Slough House mob' Irish Times 'If a good spy novel needs anything, it's uncertainty, a hall of mirrors; and Witchfinder delivers it in spades. Great stuff' Dominick Donald, author of Breathe 'One of Britain's most accomplished thriller writers' Daily Mail 'Williams is an accomplished thriller writer and this may be his best book yet. London in the 1960s, its smoky pubs, damp streets and crackle of sexual liberation is so well portrayed that reading Witchfinder is almost like time travel. Williams blends fact and fiction to make a captivating read.' Financial Times
Categories: Fiction

Love and Deception

Love and Deception

Page, Bruce, Leitch, David and Knightley, Phillip, Philby: The Spy who Betrayed a Generation (London: Penguin, ... 1999) Philipps, Roland, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean (London: The Bodley Head, 2018) Pincher, ...

Author: James Hanning

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781472155931

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 112

'A brilliantly researched and revelatory book, written with compelling authority and great narrative drive. Completely fascinating' William Boyd Love & Deception is the extraordinary story of how Eleanor, an able, cultured American living in the espionage hot spot of 1950s Beirut, fell in love with the kindest, most sensitive of men. Unknown to her, that man, a Lebanon-based journalist, Kim Philby, was under suspicion by the British and US intelligence services of having secretly signed up to help the Russians fight fascism in the 1930s, and of remaining in their pay at the height of the Cold War. Despite his mysterious past, Eleanor adored and married Philby, who later begged her to defy his difficulties. As the net closed in on Philby, he manoeuvred to save himself, but would their love survive? The outline of Philby's story is familiar to many, but Love & Deception breaks remarkable new ground - even for spy buffs. Through in-depth research, Hanning produces an eye-opening tale of friendship, politics, love, and loyalty.
Categories: History

British Traitors

British Traitors

... The Philby Conspiracy, New York: Doubleday, 1968 Penrose, Barrie and Freeman, Simon, Conspiracy of Silence: The Secret Life of Anthony Blunt, London: Grafton, 1986 Phillips, Roland, A Spy Named Orphan: The Enigma of Donald Maclean, ...

Author: Gordon Kerr

Publisher: Oldcastle Books Ltd

ISBN: 9780857304803

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 398

Capital punishment was abolished for murder in Great Britain in 1969, but remained as the punishment for high treason until as recently as 1998, demonstrating how seriously we take the crime of betraying your country. But even with the threat of the noose hanging over them, many still chose the path of treachery during the cataclysmic events of last century. British Traitors examines the lives and motivations of a number of the perpetrators of this most heinous of crimes, following the footsteps of Fascist traitors such as William Joyce (Lord Haw-Haw) and John Amery to the gallows, investigating what drove men such as Wilfred Macartney and John Herbert King to betray their country during the war to end all wars and delving into the mysterious web of espionage and subterfuge surrounding the Cambridge Spy Ring that spied for the Soviet Union from the nineteen-thirties until the early nineteen-fifties. People commit treason for many reasons - some seek adventure, some seek reward, some are motivated by political philosophy, while others are sucked into it by their own foolishness. British Traitors provides a fascinating look at the lives and impulses of those who chose to betray their country.
Categories: History