A New History of Japanese Cinema

A New History of Japanese Cinema

The book's coverage of the post-occupation period looks at "romance" films in particular. Avant-garde directors came to the fore during the 1960s and early seventies, and their work is discussed in depth.

Author: Isolde Standish

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441161543

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 925

In A New History of Japanese Cinema Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film. She details an industry and an art form shaped by the competing and merging forces of traditional culture and of economic and technological innovation. Adopting a thematic, exploratory approach, Standish links the concept of Japanese cinema as a system of communication with some of the central discourses of the twentieth century: modernism, nationalism, humanism, resistance, and gender. After an introduction outlining the earliest years of cinema in Japan, Standish demonstrates cinema's symbolic position in Japanese society in the 1930s - as both a metaphor and a motor of modernity. Moving into the late thirties and early forties, Standish analyses cinema's relationship with the state-focusing in particular on the war and occupation periods. The book's coverage of the post-occupation period looks at "romance" films in particular. Avant-garde directors came to the fore during the 1960s and early seventies, and their work is discussed in depth. The book concludes with an investigation of genre and gender in mainstream films of recent years. In grappling with Japanese film history and criticism, most western commentators have concentrated on offering interpretations of what have come to be considered "classic" films. A New History of Japanese Cinema takes a genuinely innovative approach to the subject, and should prove an essential resource for many years to come.
Categories: Performing Arts

What Is Japanese Cinema

What Is Japanese Cinema

In What Is Japanese Cinema? Yomota Inuhiko provides a concise and lively history of Japanese film that shows how cinema tells the story of Japan’s modern age.

Author: Yomota Inuhiko

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231549486

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 228

View: 846

What might Godzilla and Kurosawa have in common? What, if anything, links Ozu’s sparse portraits of domestic life and the colorful worlds of anime? In What Is Japanese Cinema? Yomota Inuhiko provides a concise and lively history of Japanese film that shows how cinema tells the story of Japan’s modern age. Discussing popular works alongside auteurist masterpieces, Yomota considers films in light of both Japanese cultural particularities and cinema as a worldwide art form. He covers the history of Japanese film from the silent era to the rise of J-Horror in its historical, technological, and global contexts. Yomota shows how Japanese film has been shaped by traditonal art forms such as kabuki theater as well as foreign influences spanning Hollywood and Italian neorealism. Along the way, he considers the first golden age of Japanese film; colonial filmmaking in Korea, Manchuria, and Taiwan; the impact of World War II and the U.S. occupation; the Japanese film industry’s rise to international prominence during the 1950s and 1960s; and the challenges and technological shifts of recent decades. Alongside a larger thematic discussion of what defines and characterizes Japanese film, Yomota provides insightful readings of canonical directors including Kurosawa, Ozu, Suzuki, and Miyazaki as well as genre movies, documentaries, indie film, and pornography. An incisive and opinionated history, What Is Japanese Cinema? is essential reading for admirers and students of Japan’s contributions to the world of film.
Categories: Performing Arts

Time Frames

Time Frames

Scott Nygren explores how Japanese film criticism and history has been written both within and beyond Japan. He takes up the central question of which, and whose, Japan do critics and historians mean when reviewing the country's cinema.

Author: Scott Nygren

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816647089

Category: History

Page: 297

View: 685

Until 1951, when Kurosawa’s Rashomon won the Golden Lion award for best film at the Venice Film Festival, Japanese cinema was isolated from world distribution and the international discourse on film. After this historic event, however, Japanese cinema could no longer be ignored.In Time Frames, Scott Nygren explores how Japanese film criticism and history has been written both within and beyond Japan, before and after Rashomon. He takes up the central question of which, and whose, Japan do critics and historians mean when reviewing the country’s cinema—an issue complicated by assumptions about cultural purity, Japan’s appropriation of Western ideas and technologies, and the very existence of a West and an Orientalist non-West.Deftly moving backward and forward from the pivotal 1951 festival, Nygren traces the invention of Japanese film history as a disciplinary mode of knowledge. His analysis includes such topics as the reconfiguration of prewar films in light of postwar recognition, the application of psychoanalytic theory to Japanese art and culture, and the intersection of kanji and cinema. He considers the historical inscription of 1950s Japan as “the golden age of the humanist film,” the identification of a Japanese New Wave and the implications of categorizing Japanese film through analogy to other national cinemas. Bringing the discussion to Japan’s reception of postmodernism, Nygren looks at the emergence of video art and anime and the end of Japanese film history as a meaningful concept in the rise of the Internet and globalization.Nygren highlights the creative exchange among North American, European, and Asian media, places Japanese film at the center of this discourse, and, ultimately, reveals its global role as a cultural medium, capable of transforming theory.Scott Nygren is associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Florida.
Categories: History

Historical Dictionary of Japanese Cinema

Historical Dictionary of Japanese Cinema

The cross-referenced dictionary entries cover key films, genres, studios, directors, performers, and other individuals. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Japanese cinema.

Author: Jasper Sharp

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810875418

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 564

View: 197

The cinema of Japan predates that of Russia, China, and India, and it has been able to sustain itself without outside assistance for over a century. Japanese cinema's long history of production and considerable output has seen films made in a variety of genres, including melodramas, romances, gangster movies, samurai movies, musicals, horror films, and monster films. It has also produced some of the most famous names in the history of cinema: Akira Kurosawa, Hayao Miyazaki, Beat Takeshi, Toshirô Mifune, Godzilla, The Ring, Akira, Rashomon, and Seven Samurai. The Historical Dictionary of Japanese Cinema is an introduction to and overview of the long history of Japanese cinema. It aims to provide an entry point for those with little or no familiarity with the subject, while it is organized so that scholars in the field will also be able to use it to find specific information. This is done through a detailed chronology, an introductory essay, and appendixes of films, film studios, directors, and performers. The cross-referenced dictionary entries cover key films, genres, studios, directors, performers, and other individuals. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Japanese cinema.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Japanese Cinema Book

The Japanese Cinema Book

The Japanese Cinema Book provides a new and comprehensive survey of one of the world's most fascinating and widely admired filmmaking regions.

Author: Hideaki Fujiki

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781844576814

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 624

View: 230

The Japanese Cinema Book provides a new and comprehensive survey of one of the world's most fascinating and widely admired filmmaking regions. In terms of its historical coverage, broad thematic approach and the significant international range of its authors, it is the largest and most wide-ranging publication of its kind to date. Ranging from renowned directors such as Akira Kurosawa to neglected popular genres such as the film musical and encompassing topics such as ecology, spectatorship, home-movies, colonial history and relations with Hollywood and Europe, The Japanese Cinema Book presents a set of new, and often surprising, perspectives on Japanese film. With its plural range of interdisciplinary perspectives based on the expertise of established and emerging scholars and critics, The Japanese Cinema Book provides a groundbreaking picture of the different ways in which Japanese cinema may be understood as a local, regional, national, transnational and global phenomenon. The book's innovative structure combines general surveys of a particular historical topic or critical approach with various micro-level case studies. It argues there is no single fixed Japanese cinema, but instead a fluid and varied field of Japanese filmmaking cultures that continue to exist in a dynamic relationship with other cinemas, media and regions. The Japanese Cinema Book is divided into seven inter-related sections: · Theories and Approaches · * Institutions and Industry · * Film Style · * Genre · * Times and Spaces of Representation · * Social Contexts · * Flows and Interactions
Categories: Performing Arts

A Hundred Years of Japanese Film

A Hundred Years of Japanese Film

This guide has been updated to include not only the best new movie releases, but also classic films available in these formats for the first time.

Author: Donald Richie

Publisher: Kodansha USA Incorporated

ISBN: 1568364393

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 317

View: 588

The authoritative guide to Japanese film, completely revised and updated. Now available in paperback for the first time, A Hundred Years of Japanese Film by Donald Richie, the foremost Western expert on Japanese film, gives us an incisive, detailed, and fully illustrated history of the country's cinema. Called "the dean of Japan's arts critics" by Time magazine, Richie takes us from the inception of Japanese cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, through the achievements of Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Ozu, then on to the notable works of contemporary filmmakers. This revised edition includes analyses of the latest trends in Japanese cinema, such as the revival of the horror genre, and introduces today's up-and-coming directors and their works. As Paul Schrader writes in his perceptive foreword, Richie's accounting of the Japanese film "retains his sensitivity to the actual circumstances of film production (something filmmakers know very well but historians often overlook) . . . and shows the interweave of filmmaking-the contributions of directors, writers, cinematographers, actors, musicians, art directors, as well as financiers." Of primary interest to those who would like to watch the works introduced in these pages, Richie has provided capsule reviews of the major subtitled Japanese films commercially available in DVD and VHS formats. This guide has been updated to include not only the best new movie releases, but also classic films available in these formats for the first time.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Cinema

The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Cinema

This book provides a multifaceted single-volume account of Japanese cinema.

Author: Daisuke Miyao

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199731664

Category: History

Page: 483

View: 641

This book provides a multifaceted single-volume account of Japanese cinema. It addresses productive debates about what Japanese cinema is, where Japanese cinema is, as well as what and where Japanese cinema studies is, at the so-called period of crisis of national boundary under globalization and the so-called period of crisis of cinema under digitalization.
Categories: History

The Japanese Film

The Japanese Film

Tracing the development of the Japanese cinema from 1896 (when the first Kinetoscope was imported) through the golden ages of film in Japan up to today, this work reveals the once flourishing film industry and the continuing unique art of ...

Author: Joseph L. Anderson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691187464

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 750

Tracing the development of the Japanese cinema from 1896 (when the first Kinetoscope was imported) through the golden ages of film in Japan up to today, this work reveals the once flourishing film industry and the continuing unique art of the Japanese film. Now back in print with updated sections, major revaluations, a comprehensive international bibliography, and an exceptional collection of 168 stills ranging over eight decades, this book remains the unchallenged reference for all who seek a broad understanding of the aesthetic, historical, and economic elements of motion pictures from Japan.
Categories: Performing Arts

The End of Japanese Cinema

The End of Japanese Cinema

In The End of Japanese Cinema Alexander Zahlten moves film theory beyond the confines of film itself, attending to the emergence of new kinds of aesthetics, politics, temporalities, and understandings of film and media.

Author: Alexander Zahlten

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822372462

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 305

In The End of Japanese Cinema Alexander Zahlten moves film theory beyond the confines of film itself, attending to the emergence of new kinds of aesthetics, politics, temporalities, and understandings of film and media. He traces the evolution of a new media ecology through deep historical analyses of the Japanese film industry from the 1960s to the 2000s. Zahlten focuses on three popular industrial genres: Pink Film (independently distributed softcore pornographic films), Kadokawa (big-budget productions as part of a transmedia strategy), and V-Cinema (direct-to-video films). He examines the conditions of these films' production to demonstrate how the media industry itself becomes part of the politics of the media text and to highlight the complex negotiation between media and politics, culture, and identity in Japan. Zahlten points to a different history of film, one in which a once-powerful film industry transformed into becoming only one component within a complex media-mix ecology. In so doing, Zahlten opens new paths for uncovering similar broad processes in other large media societies. A Study of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University
Categories: Social Science

Kurosawa

Kurosawa

This work will become not only the newly definitive study of Kurosawa, but will redefine the field of Japanese cinema studies, particularly as the field exists in the west. “Yoshimoto’sKurosawais destined to take its place along with ...

Author: Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822325195

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 485

View: 196

This work will become not only the newly definitive study of Kurosawa, but will redefine the field of Japanese cinema studies, particularly as the field exists in the west.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Imperial Screen

The Imperial Screen

Peter B. High's treatment of the Japanese film world as a microcosm of the entire sphere of Japanese wartime culture demonstrates what happens when conscientious artists and intellectuals become enmeshed in a totalitarian regime.

Author: Peter B. High

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299181340

Category: History

Page: 586

View: 646

From the late 1920s through World War II, film became a crucial tool in the state of Japan. Detailing the way Japanese directors, scriptwriters, company officials, and bureaucrats colluded to produce films that supported the war effort, The Imperial Screen is a highly-readable account of the realities of cultural life in wartime Japan. Widely hailed as "epoch-making" by the Japanese press, it presents the most comprehensive survey yet published of "national policy" films, relating their montage and dramatic structures to the cultural currents, government policies, and propaganda goals of the era. Peter B. High's treatment of the Japanese film world as a microcosm of the entire sphere of Japanese wartime culture demonstrates what happens when conscientious artists and intellectuals become enmeshed in a totalitarian regime.
Categories: History

Japanese Cinema

Japanese Cinema

Bringing together leading international scholars and showcasing pioneering new research, this book is essential reading for all students and general readers interested in one of the world’s most important film industries.

Author: Alastair Phillips

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134334223

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 244

Japanese Cinema includes twenty-four chapters on key films of Japanese cinema, from the silent era to the present day, providing a comprehensive introduction to Japanese cinema history and Japanese culture and society. Studying a range of important films, from Late Spring, Seven Samurai and In the Realm of the Senses to Godzilla, Hana-Bi and Ring, the collection includes discussion of all the major directors of Japanese cinema including Ozu, Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, Oshima, Suzuki, Kitano and Miyazaki. Each chapter discusses the film in relation to aesthetic, industrial or critical issues and ends with a complete filmography for each director. The book also includes a full glossary of terms and a comprehensive bibliography of readings on Japanese cinema. Bringing together leading international scholars and showcasing pioneering new research, this book is essential reading for all students and general readers interested in one of the world’s most important film industries.
Categories: Performing Arts

Japanese Cinema Between Frames

Japanese Cinema Between Frames

This book explores the rich complexity of Japan’s film history by tracing how cinema has been continually reshaped through its dynamic engagement within a shifting media ecology.

Author: Laura Lee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319663739

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 177

View: 570

This book explores the rich complexity of Japan’s film history by tracing how cinema has been continually reshaped through its dynamic engagement within a shifting media ecology. Focusing on techniques that draw attention to the interval between frames on the filmstrip, something that is generally obscured in narrative film, Lee uncovers a chief mechanism by which, from its earliest period, the medium has capitalized on its materiality to instantiate its contemporaneity. In doing so, cinema has bound itself tightly with adjacent visual forms such as anime and manga to redefine itself across its history of interaction with new media, including television, video, and digital formats. Japanese Cinema Between Frames is a bold examination of Japanese film aesthetics that reframes the nation’s cinema history, illuminating processes that have both contributed to the unique texture of Japanese films and yoked the nation’s cinema to the global sphere of film history.
Categories: Performing Arts

Japanese Cinema

Japanese Cinema

Japanese film has recently emerged as one of the major national cinemas and now commands world respect and attention.Donald Richie, the internationally recognized authority, who did so much to introduce the work of directors of the calibre ...

Author: Donald Richie

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: UOM:39015019557183

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 102

View: 149

Japanese film has recently emerged as one of the major national cinemas and now commands world respect and attention.Donald Richie, the internationally recognized authority, who did so much to introduce the work of directors of the calibre of Yasujiro Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Akira Kurosawa to the West, now provides the first ever introduction to Japanese cinema, offering both an up-to-date history and aninvestigation into the qualities of the jidai-geki (costume drama) and the gendai-geji (contemporary drama) that make Japanese film Japanese.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Nippon Modern

Nippon Modern

Nippon Modern is the first intensive study of Japanese cinema in the 1920s and 1930s, a period in which the country's film industry was at its most prolific and a time when cinema played a singular role in shaping Japanese modernity.

Author: Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824831820

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 185

View: 186

Nippon Modern is the first intensive study of Japanese cinema in the 1920s and 1930s, a period in which the country's film industry was at its most prolific and a time when cinema played a singular role in shaping Japanese modernity. During the interwar period, the signs of modernity were ubiquitous in Japan's urban architecture, literature, fashion, advertising, popular music, and cinema. The reconstruction of Tokyo following the disastrous earthquake of 1923 highlighted the extent of this cultural transformation, and the film industry embraced the reconfigured space as an expression of the modern. Shochiku Kamata Film Studios (1920-1936), the focus of this study, was the only studio that continued filmmaking in Tokyo following the city's complete destruction. Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano points to the influence of the new urban culture in Shochiku's interwar films, acclaimed as modan na eiga, or modern films, by and for Japanese. Wada-Marciano's thought-provoking examinations illustrate the reciprocal relationship between cinema and Japan's vernacular modernity--what Japanese modernity actually meant to Japanese. Her thorough and thoughtful analyses of dozens of films within the cultural contexts of Japan contribute to the current inquiry into non-Western vernacular modernities.
Categories: Performing Arts

Contemporary Japanese Film

Contemporary Japanese Film

Presents some 400 reviews of Japanese films made in the 1990s. Also includes profiles of 15 Japanese directors, including Akira Kurosawa, Takeshi Kitano, and Jun Ichikawa.

Author: Mark Schilling

Publisher: Weatherhill, Incorporated

ISBN: 0834804158

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 399

View: 928

Presents some 400 reviews of Japanese films made in the 1990s. Also includes profiles of 15 Japanese directors, including Akira Kurosawa, Takeshi Kitano, and Jun Ichikawa.
Categories: Performing Arts

Reframing Japanese Cinema

Reframing Japanese Cinema

Authorship, Genre, History Nolletti, Jr. (Arthur), Arthur Nolletti, David Desser. is
not explicit in the words . The reading of these works is more complex than single
- track reading of a novel that has only scattered , incidental illustrations . 16 Iharu
 ...

Author: Nolletti, Jr. (Arthur)

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015028432949

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 365

View: 920

Categories: Performing Arts

Classical Japanese Cinema Revisited

Classical Japanese Cinema Revisited

Including studies of landmark films by Ozu, Kurosawa and other directors, this book provides a perfect introduction to a crucial and often misunderstood area of Japanese cultural output.

Author: Catherine Russell

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441144614

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 116

Catherine Russell's highly accessible book approaches Japanese cinema as an industry closely modeled on Hollywood, focusing on the classical period - those years in which the studio system dominated all film production in Japan, from roughly 1930 to 1960. Respectful and thoroughly informed about the aesthetics and critical values of the Japanese canon, Russell is also critical of some of its ideological tendencies, and her analyses provide new insights on class and gender dynamics. Russell locates Japanese cinema within a global system of reception, and she highlights the importance of the industrial production context of these films. Including studies of landmark films by Ozu, Kurosawa and other directors, this book provides a perfect introduction to a crucial and often misunderstood area of Japanese cultural output. With a critical approach that highlights the "everydayness" of Japanese studio-era cinema, Catherine Russell demystifies the canon of great Japanese cinema, treating it with fewer auteurist and Orientalist assumptions than many other scholars and critics.
Categories: Performing Arts

Traveling Film History

Traveling Film History

Author: Sharon H. Hayashi

Publisher: Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International

ISBN: OCLC:434869089

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 558

View: 499

Categories: Motion pictures

From Book to Screen

From Book to Screen

The author has written this book to help Western audiences see Japanese films for what they are: universal in appeal, if sometimes difficult to access thanks to differences as vast as Eastern and Western culture.

Author: Keiko I. McDonald

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 0765603888

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 326

View: 817

Of all the world's cinemas, Japan's is perhaps unique in its closeness to the nation's literature, past and contemporary. The Western world became aware of this when Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon was awarded the Grand Prize at the Venice film festival in 1951 and the Oscar for best foreign film in 1952. More recent examples include Shohei Imamura's Eel, which won him the Palme d'Or (Best Picture) at Cannes in 1997. From Book to Screen breaks new ground by exploring important connections between Japan's modern literary tradition and its national cinema. The first part offers a historical and cultural overview of the working relation that developed between pure literature and film. It deals with three important periods in which filmmakers relied most heavily on literary works for enriching and developing cinematic art. The second part gives detailed analyses of a dozen literary works and their screen adaptations. For many reasons, the works selected for comparison and study all deserve cross-disciplinary analysis. For example, Ooka's Lady Musashino and Mizoguchi's film adaptation of it study adultery as a topic of great concern in postwar Japan. Even so, they differ significantly in their modes of representation. Both Toson's Broken Commandment and Ichikawa's film version investigate a difficult social issue, the plight of the outcast; here again, writer and director approach and interpret it in completely different ways. The author has written this book to help Western audiences see Japanese films for what they are: universal in appeal, if sometimes difficult to access thanks to differences as vast as Eastern and Western culture. Now that our century of cinema is yielding to a centuryof video, the need to bridge differences can only grow more pressing -- and rewarding.
Categories: Literary Collections