A Hero in France

A Hero in France

Spring, 1941.

Author: Alan Furst

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781474602938

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 825

Spring, 1941. Britain is losing the war. Paris is occupied by the Nazis, dark and silent at night. But when the clouds part, and moonlight floods the city, a Resistance leader called Mathieu steps out to begin his work. The fighters of the French Resistance are determined not to give up. These courageous men and women - young and old, aristocrats and nightclub owners, teachers and students - help downed British airmen reach the border with Spain. In farmhouses and rural churches, in secret hotels, and on the streets, they risk everything to open Europe's sealed doors and lead Allied fighters to freedom. But as the military police heightens surveillance, Mathieu and his team face a new threat, dispatched from the Reich to destroy them all.
Categories: Fiction

Marquis de Lafayette and the French Read along ebook

Marquis de Lafayette and the French  Read along ebook

An American Hero from France In 1777, thirteen British colonies in the New World fought for their freedom. Everyone who supported the war wanted to help. Soldiers prepared to fight. Military leaders planned for battle.

Author: Christine Dugan

Publisher: Teacher Created Materials

ISBN: 9781087648378

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 931

In this high-interest, nonfiction text, The Marquis de Lafayette and the French, readers will learn about the fascinating life of the Marquis de Lafayette and his influence on Alexander Hamilton and the Revolutionary War. Through the use of dynamic primary sources like maps and letters, middle school students will be engaged as they read about history and build their literacy skills. Supporting current social studies standards, this full-color text includes intriguing images, interesting sidebars, a glossary, and other important text features to support learning and strengthen key comprehension skills. Challenging activities require students to use text-evidence to connect back to what they've read.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

P tain

P  tain

A portrait of the controversial French army commander-in-chief who surrendered France's Jewish population to Nazi occupiers describes Ptain's youth as an orphan peasant and identifies the determining factors behind his decisions.

Author: Charles Williams

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: 1403970114

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 147

A portrait of the controversial French army commander-in-chief who surrendered France's Jewish population to Nazi occupiers describes Ptain's youth as an orphan peasant and identifies the determining factors behind his decisions. By the author of The Last Great Frenchman: A Life of General de Gaulle.
Categories: History

The World at Night

The World at Night

Here is a brilliant re-creation of France—its spirit in the moment of defeat, its valor in the moment of rebirth.

Author: Alan Furst

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780307432773

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 593

“First-rate research collaborates with first-rate imagination. . . . Superb.”—The Boston Globe Paris, 1940. The civilized, upper-class life of film producer Jean Casson is derailed by the German occupation of Paris, but Casson learns that with enough money, compromise, and connections, one need not deny oneself the pleasures of Parisian life. Somewhere inside Casson, though, is a stubborn romantic streak. When he’s offered the chance to take part in an operation of the British secret service, this idealism gives him the courage to say yes. A simple mission, but it goes wrong, and Casson realizes he must gamble everything—his career, the woman he loves, life itself. Here is a brilliant re-creation of France—its spirit in the moment of defeat, its valor in the moment of rebirth. Praise for The World at Night “[The World at Night] earns a comparison with the serious entertainments of Graham Greene and John le Carré. . . . Gripping, beautifully detailed . . . an absorbing glimpse into the moral maze of espionage.”—Richard Eder, Los Angeles Times “[The World at Night] is the world of Eric Ambler, the pioneering British author of classic World War II espionage fiction. . . . The novel is full of keen dialogue and witty commentary . . . . Thrilling.”—Herbert Mitgang, Chicago Tribune “With the authority of solid research and a true fascination for his material, Mr. Furst makes idealism, heroism, and sacrifice believable and real.”—David Walton, The Dallas Morning News
Categories: Fiction

A Hero s Daughter

A Hero s Daughter

Makine is considered internationally as one of the most important writers of this time. Here, the harsh realities of World War II and the postwar era are unsparingly depicted.

Author: Andreï Makine

Publisher: Arcade Publishing

ISBN: 1559706872

Category: Fiction

Page: 228

View: 765

Makine is considered internationally as one of the most important writers of this time. Here, the harsh realities of World War II and the postwar era are unsparingly depicted.
Categories: Fiction

And There Was Light

And There Was Light

When Jacques Lusseyran was an eight-year-old Parisian schoolboy, he was blinded in an accident.

Author: Jacques Lusseyran

Publisher: New World Library

ISBN: 9781608682690

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 306

View: 378

When Jacques Lusseyran was an eight-year-old Parisian schoolboy, he was blinded in an accident. He finished his schooling determined to participate in the world around him. In 1941, when he was seventeen, that world was Nazi-occupied France. Lusseyran formed a resistance group with fifty-two boys and used his heightened senses to recruit the best. Eventually, Lusseyran was arrested and sent to the Buchenwald concentration camp in a transport of two thousand resistance fighters. He was one of only thirty from the transport to survive. His gripping story is one of the most powerful and insightful descriptions of living and thriving with blindness, or indeed any challenge, ever published.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The War that Ended Peace

The War that Ended Peace

44 Although, as a man who valued reason, he opposed war he also believed in making France's armed forces stronger. He became something of a hero for French nationalists and there was a surge in the number of babies christened Raymond.

Author: Margaret MacMillan

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781847654168

Category: History

Page: 1267

View: 433

WINNER of the International Affairs Book of the Year at the Political Book Awards 2014Longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2013 The First World War followed a period of sustained peace in Europe during which people talked with confidence of prosperity, progress and hope. But in 1914, Europe walked into a catastrophic conflict which killed millions of its men, bled its economies dry, shook empires and societies to pieces, and fatally undermined Europe's dominance of the world. It was a war which could have been avoided up to the last moment-so why did it happen? Beginning in the early nineteenth century, and ending with the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand, award-winning historian Margaret MacMillan uncovers the huge political and technological changes, national decisions and -- just as important-the small moments of human muddle and weakness that led Europe from peace to disaster. This masterful exploration of how Europe chose its path towards war will change and enrich how we see this defining moment in our history.
Categories: History

The Flame of Resistance

The Flame of Resistance

This is the story of her heroic personal resistance to Nazi Germany.

Author: DAMIEN. LEWIS

Publisher:

ISBN: 1529416760

Category:

Page: 0

View: 427

'I have always been fascinated by that charismatic hero of the Resistance, Josephine Baker, but it turns out I didn't know the half of it. Lewis' story-telling blew my mind. Again.' - Dan Snow 'A story of incredible bravery in the face of tyrants who invaded a free and democratic nation, this will have powerful resonance today.' - Tim Spicer 'An eye-opening, pulse-quickening history. Josephine Baker led a wartime double life of extraordinary jeopardy and Damien Lewis's needle-sharp narrative is jagged with suspense. Yet he also writes with great warmth and sensitivity, creating a powerfully moving portrait of a woman who fought prejudice and hate in all its forms.' - Sinclair McKay 'A gripping true story of a remarkable heroine. The details of Josephine Baker's espionage for the Deuxieme Bureau, the French military intelligence agency during the war, make for a fascinating read in Damien Lewis's meticulously researched account' - Deborah Cadbury During WW2, Josephine Baker, the world's richest and most glamorous entertainer, was an Allied spy in Occupied France. This is the story of her heroic personal resistance to Nazi Germany. Prior to World War II, Josephine Baker was a music hall diva renowned for her singing and exotic dancing, her beauty and sexuality; she was the most highly-paid female performer in Europe. When the Nazis seized her adopted city, Paris, she was banned from the stage, along with all 'negroes and Jews'. Yet, instead of returning to America, she vowed to stay and to fight the Nazi evil. Overnight she went from performer to Resistance spy. In The Flame of Resistance best-selling author Damien Lewis uncovers this little known history of the famous singer's life. During the years of the war, as a member of the French Nurse paratroopers - a cover for her spying work-- she participated in numerous clandestine activities and emerged as formidable spy. In turn, she was a hero of the three countries in whose name she served: the US, the nation of her birth; France, the land that embraced her during her adult career; and Britain, the country from which she took her orders, as one of London's most closely-guarded special agents. Baker's secret war embodies a tale of unbounded courage, passion, devotion and sacrifice, and of deep and bitter tragedy, fueled by her own desire to combat the rise of Nazism, and to fight for all that is good and right in the world. Drawing on a plethora of new historical material and rigorous research, including previously undisclosed letters and journals, Lewis upends the conventional story of Josephine Baker, revealing that her mark on history went far beyond the confines of the stage.
Categories:

Contemporary France

Contemporary France

The poststructuralist and post-modernist writings of some French writers may still fascinate some people in American university campuses, and Michel Foucault may still be a hero there, but in France itself the political thought debate ...

Author: David Howarth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134659197

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 288

View: 378

At least since the French Revolution, France has the peculair distinction of simultaneously fascinating, charming and exasperating its neighbours and foreign observers. Contemporary France provides an essential introduction for students of French politics and society, exploring contemporary developments while placing them in a deeper historical, intellectual, cultural and social context that makes for insightful analysis. Thus, chapters on France's economic policy and welfare state, its foreign and European policies and its political movements and recent institutional developments are informed by an analysis of the country's unique political and institutional traditions, distinct forms of nationalism and citizenship, dynamic intellectual life and recent social trends. Summaries of key political, economic and social movements and events are displayed as exhibits.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

For the Soul of France

For the Soul of France

The conviction upon which Boulangism thrived, that France needed a hero to clean house, was greatly strengthened inSeptember 1887 by a scandal.It began,like theplay illustrating Eugène Scribe's dictum “Great effects from small causes,” ...

Author: Frederick Brown

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307592927

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 994

Frederick Brown, cultural historian, author of acclaimed biographies of Émile Zola (“Magnificent”—The New Yorker) and Flaubert (“Splendid . . . Intellectually nuanced, exquisitely written”—The New Republic) now gives us an ambitious, far-reaching book—a perfect joining of subject and writer: a portrait of fin-de-siècle France. He writes about the forces that led up to the twilight years of the nineteenth century when France, defeated by Prussia in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, was forced to cede the border states of Alsace and Lorraine, and of the resulting civil war, waged without restraint, that toppled Napoléon III, crushed the Paris Commune, and provoked a dangerous nationalism that gripped the Republic. The author describes how postwar France, a nation splintered in the face of humiliation by the foreigner—Prussia—dissolved into two cultural factions: moderates, proponents of a secular state (“Clericalism, there is the enemy!”), and reactionaries, who saw their ideal nation—militant, Catholic, royalist—embodied by Joan of Arc, with their message, that France had suffered its defeat in 1871 for having betrayed its true faith. A bitter debate took hold of the heart and soul of the country, framed by the vision of “science” and “technological advancement” versus “supernatural intervention.” Brown shows us how Paris’s most iconic monuments that rose up during those years bear witness to the passionate decades-long quarrel. At one end of Paris was Gustave Eiffel’s tower, built in iron and more than a thousand feet tall, the beacon of a forward-looking nation; at Paris’ other end, at the highest point in the city, the basilica of the Sacré-Coeur, atonement for the country’s sins and moral laxity whose punishment was France’s defeat in the war . . . Brown makes clear that the Dreyfus Affair—the cannonade of the 1890s—can only be understood in light of these converging forces. “The Affair” shaped the character of public debate and informed private life. At stake was the fate of a Republic born during the Franco-Prussian War and reared against bitter opposition. The losses that abounded during this time—the financial loss suffered by thousands in the crash of the Union Génerale, a bank founded in 1875 to promote Catholic interests with Catholic capital outside the Rothschilds’ sphere of influence, along with the failure of the Panama Canal Company—spurred the partisan press, which blamed both disasters on Jewry. The author writes how the roiling conflicts that began thirty years before Dreyfus did not end with his exoneration in 1900. Instead they became the festering point that led to France’s surrender to Hitler’s armies in 1940, when the Third Republic fell and the Vichy government replaced it, with Marshal Pétain heralded as the latest incarnation of Joan of Arc, France’s savior . . .
Categories: History