9 11 Fiction Empathy and Otherness

9 11 Fiction  Empathy  and Otherness

Span style=""font-weight:bold;""Tim Gauthier is director of interdisciplinary studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Author: Tim Gauthier

Publisher:

ISBN: 0739193457

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 465

9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness analyzes recent works of fiction whose principal subject is the attacks of September 11, 2001. The readings of the novels question and assess the validity and potential effectiveness of both the subsequent calls for a cosmopolitan outlook and the related, but no less significant, emphasis placed on empathy, and exhibited in such recent studies as Jeremy Rifkin's The Empathic Civilization, Karsten Stueber's Rediscovering Empathy, and Julinna Oxley's The Moral Dimensions of Empathy. As such, this study examines the extent to which "us" and "them" narratives proliferated after 9/11, and the degree to which calls for greater empathy and a renewed emphasis on cosmopolitan values served to counterbalance an apparent movement towards increased polarization, encapsulated in the oft-mentioned "clash of civilizations." A principal objective of the book is thus to examine the ethical and political implications revealed in the exercising or withholding of empathy. For though empathy, in and of itself, may not be sufficient, it is nevertheless a vital component in the generation of actions one might identify as cosmopolitan. In other words, this book examines the responses to 9/11 (in both Western and non-Western novels) in order to uncover what their dramatic renderings might tell us about the possibility of a truly globalized community. The attainability of any cosmopolitan engagement is contingent upon our abilities to understand the other, knowing always that otherness eludes our grasp, and the best we can do is imagine some version of it. It is primarily in this capacity that the novel has a role to play. Whether it is the challenge of connecting with the survivors of trauma and the inhabitants of a traumatized city, or with a hyperpower that has experienced its own vulnerability for the first time, or even with the terrorist who seeks to commit violent acts, these novels afford us the means of examining the complex dynamics involved in any exhibition of fellow-feeling for the other, and the ever-present potential failure of that engagement.
Categories: Literary Criticism

9 11 Fiction Empathy and Otherness

9 11 Fiction  Empathy  and Otherness

As will become clear, I believe that literature can play a vital role in the contemplation of these questions. This is made clear in a number of full-length studies on the literary subgenre now known as post-9/11 fiction.

Author: Tim Gauthier

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739193464

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 544

9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness analyzes recent works of fiction whose principal subject is the attacks of September 11, 2001.
Categories: Literary Criticism

British and American Representations of 9 11

British and American Representations of 9 11

One of them is Tim Gauthier, who in 2015 published 9/11 Fiction, Empathy and Otherness (Lexington Books). His focus, obvious from the title, shifts from what one feels (including trauma) to how one perceives what the other feels, ...

Author: Oana-Celia Gheorghiu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319752501

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 269

View: 288

This book argues that twenty-first-century neorealist fiction is inspired by political and journalistic discourses and, along with them, constitutes one of the many representations of the attacks on September 11 and their outcomes. Adopting a neorealist stance, this book is placed at the intersection of realism and fiction, with often reference to what is perceived as objective writing (media and political texts), not at all so divorced from the practice of literary writings on the event that shook the world on September 11, 2001.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Radical Planes 9 11 and Patterns of Continuity

Radical Planes  9 11 and Patterns of Continuity

Most recently, Kristine A. Miller's collection of essays, Transatlantic Literature and Culture After 9/11: The Wrong Side of Paradise (2014), ... 24 Gauthier, Tim, 9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness, Lanham, 2015, 255.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004324220

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 897

This volume explores the intersections between narrative disruption and continuity in post-9/11 narratives from an interdisciplinary transnational perspective, foregrounding the transatlantic cultural memory of 9/11.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Post 9 11 Historical Fiction and Alternate History Fiction

Post 9 11 Historical Fiction and Alternate History Fiction

9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness. London: Lexington Books, 2015. Gerstein, Mordicai. The Man Who Walked between the Towers. New Milford: Roaring 2003. Giles, Paul. The Global Remapping of American Literature. Princeton: Princeton UP ...

Author: Pei-chen Liao

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030524920

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 523

Drawing on theories of historiography, memory, and diaspora, as well as from existing genre studies, this book explores why contemporary writers are so fascinated with history. Pei-chen Liao considers how fiction contributes to the making and remaking of the transnational history of the U.S. by thinking beyond and before 9/11, investigating how the dynamics of memory, as well as the emergent present, influences readers’ reception of historical fiction and alternate history fiction and their interpretation of the past. Set against the historical backdrop of WWII, the Vietnam War, and the War on Terror, the novels under discussion tell Jewish, Japanese, white American, African, Muslim, and Native Americans’ stories of trauma and survival. As a means to transmit memories of past events, these novels demonstrate how multidirectional memory can be not only collective but connective, as exemplified by the echoes that post-9/11 readers hear between different histories of violence that the novels chronicle, as well as between the past and the present.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The City Since 9 11

The City Since 9 11

Reparations (2006) and, more recently, 9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness (2015). Karolina Golimowska studied English and American Studies, Media Studies and German Literature in Berlin and London. She holds a PhD in American Studies ...

Author: Keith Wilhite

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781611477191

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 302

View: 168

This book analyzes post-9/11 literature, film, and television through an interdisciplinary lens, taking into account contemporary debates about spatial practices, gentrification, cosmopolitanism, memory and history, nostalgia, the uncanny and the abject, postmodern virtuality, the politics of realism, and the economic and social life of cities. Featuring an international group of scholars, the volume theorizes how literary and visual representations expose the persistent conflicts that arise as cities rebuild in the shadow of past ruins.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cultural Imaginary of Terrorism in Public Discourse Literature and Film

The Cultural Imaginary of Terrorism in Public Discourse  Literature  and Film

88 Ann Keniston and Jeanne Follansbee Quinn, “Introduction: Representing 9/11: Literature and Resistance,” in ... in 9/11 Fiction (Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2014); Tim Gauthier, 9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness (Lanham, ...

Author: Michael C. Frank

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781134837298

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 777

This study investigates the overlaps between political discourse and literary and cinematic fiction, arguing that both are informed by, and contribute to, the cultural imaginary of terrorism. Whenever mass-mediated acts of terrorism occur, they tend to trigger a proliferation of threat scenarios not only in the realm of literature and film but also in the statements of policymakers, security experts, and journalists. In the process, the discursive boundary between the factual and the speculative can become difficult to discern. To elucidate this phenomenon, this book proposes that terror is a halfway house between the real and the imaginary. For what characterizes terrorism is less the single act of violence than it is the fact that this act is perceived to be the beginning, or part, of a potential series, and that further acts are expected to occur. As turn-of-the-century writers such as Stevenson and Conrad were the first to point out, this gives terror a fantastical dimension, a fact reinforced by the clandestine nature of both terrorist and counter-terrorist operations. Supported by contextual readings of selected texts and films from The Dynamiter and The Secret Agent through late-Victorian science fiction to post-9/11 novels and cinema, this study explores the complex interplay between actual incidents of political violence, the surrounding discourse, and fictional engagement with the issue to show how terrorism becomes an object of fantasy. Drawing on research from a variety of disciplines, The Cultural Imaginary of Terrorism will be a valuable resource for those with interests in the areas of Literature and Film, Terrorism Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, Trauma Studies, and Cultural Studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

US Narratives of Nuclear Terrorism Since 9 11

US Narratives of Nuclear Terrorism Since 9 11

9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. Print. Gavin, Patrick. 2013. Dorgan's Twist on Gridlock. Politico (July 8), http://www. politico.com/story/2013/07/gridlock-byron-dorgan-cyberthriller-093843/.

Author: David Seed

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137543288

Category: Political Science

Page: 347

View: 603

This study examines the US fiction and related films which makes a series of interventions in the cultural debate over the threat of nuclear terrorism. It traces the beginnings of this anxiety from the 1970s, which increased during the 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The traumatic events of 9/11 became a major reference point for this fiction, which expressed the fear that of a second and worse 9/11. The study examines narratives of conspiracies which are detected and forestalled, and of others which lead to the worst of all outcomes – nuclear detonations, sometimes delivered by suitcase nukes. In some of these narratives the very fate of the nation hangs in the balance in the face of nuclear apocalypse. The discussion considers cases of attacks by electromagnetic pulse (EMP), cyberterrorism and even bioterrorism. Some of the authors examined are present or former politicians, members of the CIA, and former president, Bill Clinton.
Categories: Political Science

Empathy in Contemporary Poetry after Crisis

Empathy in Contemporary Poetry after Crisis

An Eye for an Eye Makes the Whole World Blind: Poets on 9/11. Eds. Cohen and Matson. ... Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. ... Ed. Jean Decety. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2012. 263–73. Gauthier, Tim. 9/11 Fiction ...

Author: Anna Veprinska

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030343200

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 539

This book examines the representation of empathy in contemporary poetry after crisis, specifically poetry after the Holocaust, the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and Hurricane Katrina. The text argues that, recognizing both the possibilities and dangers of empathy, the poems under consideration variously invite and refuse empathy, thus displaying what Anna Veprinska terms empathetic dissonance. Veprinska proposes that empathetic dissonance reflects the texts’ struggle with the question of the value and possibility of empathy in the face of the crises to which these texts respond. Examining poems from Charlotte Delbo, Dionne Brand, Niyi Osundare, Charles Reznikoff, Robert Fitterman, Wisława Szymborska, Cynthia Hogue, Claudia Rankine, Paul Celan, Dan Pagis, Lucille Clifton, and Katie Ford, among others, Veprinska considers empathetic dissonance through language, witnessing, and theology. Merging comparative close readings with interdisciplinary theory from philosophy, psychology, cultural theory, history and literary theory, and trauma studies, this book juxtaposes a genocide, a terrorist act, and a natural disaster amplified by racial politics and human disregard in order to consider what happens to empathy in poetry after events at the limits of empathy.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

Although the effects of 9/11 are registered in the past's engulfing of the present through media saturation, ... 8; cited by Tim Gauthier in 9/11 Fiction, Empathy, and Otherness (New York and London: Lexington Books, 2015), p. 6. 5.

Author: James Acheson

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474403740

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 374

Focuses on the novels published since 2000 by twenty major British novelistsThe Contemporary British Novel Since 2000 is divided into five parts, with the first part examining the work of four particularly well-known and highly regarded twenty-first century writers: Ian McEwan, David Mitchell, Hilary Mantel and Zadie Smith. It is with reference to each of these novelists in turn that the terms arealist, apostmodernist, ahistorical and apostcolonialist fiction are introduced, while in the remaining four parts, other novelists are discussed and the meaning of the terms amplified. From the start it is emphasised that these terms and others often mean different things to different novelists, and that the complexity of their novels often obliges us to discuss their work with reference to more than one of the terms.Also discusses the works of: Maggie OFarrell, Sarah Hall, A.L. Kennedy, Alan Warner, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kate Atkinson, Salman Rushdie, Adam Foulds, Sarah Waters, James Robertson, Mohsin Hamid, Andrea Levy, and Aminatta Forna.
Categories: Literary Criticism