Haruki Murakami and the Search for Self Therapy

Haruki Murakami and the Search for Self Therapy

Rubin and Gabriel), 1Q84, 385. 27 Kawamura, “Naze kōiu monogatari,” 53. ... 34 Thorne, “1Q84 by Haruki Murakami.” 35 Schulz, “Murakami's Mega-Opus.” 36 Kuroko, 1Q84 hihan, 48–9, 68. 37 Kuroko, 1Q84 hihan, 68. 38 Murakami (trans.

Author: Jonathan Dil

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350270558

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 392

Haruki Murakami, a global literary phenomenon, has said that he started writing fiction as a means of self-therapy. What he has not discussed as much is what he needed self-therapy for. This book argues that by understanding more about why Murakami writes, and by linking this with the question of how he writes, readers can better understand what he writes. Murakami's fiction, in other words, can be read as a search for self-therapy. In five chapters which explore Murakami's fourteen novels to date, this book argues that there are four prominent therapeutic threads woven through Murakami's fiction that can be traced back to his personal traumas - most notably Murakami's falling out with his late father and the death of a former girlfriend – and which have also transcended them in significant ways as they have been transformed into literary fiction. The first thread looks at the way melancholia must be worked through for mourning to occur and healing to happen; the second thread looks at how symbolic acts of sacrifice can help to heal intergenerational trauma; the third thread looks at the way people with avoidant attachment styles can begin to open themselves up to love again; the fourth thread looks at how individuation can manifest as a response to nihilism. Meticulously researched and written with sensitivity, the result is a sophisticated exploration of Murakami's published novels as an evolving therapeutic project that will be of great value to all scholars of Japanese literature and culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Murakami Haruki and Our Years of Pilgrimage

Murakami Haruki and Our Years of Pilgrimage

Patricia Welch In 1Q84 (2011; 1Q84 [2009–2010]) Murakami Haruki makes reference to George Orwell's bleak dystopic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) to present a tale that reveals the importance of dreams, memory, and narrative at both ...

Author: Gitte Marianne Hansen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429594915

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 310

This book is a timely and expansive volume on Murakami Haruki, arguably Japan's most high-profile contemporary writer. With contributions from prominent Murakami scholars, this book approaches the works of Murakami Haruki through interdisciplinary perspectives, discussing their significance and value through the lenses of history; geography; politics; gender and sexuality; translation; and literary influence and circulation. Together the chapters provide a multifaceted assessment on Murakami’s literary oeuvre in the last four decades, vouching for its continuous importance in understanding the world and Japan in contemporary times. The book also features exclusive material that includes the cultural critic Katō Norihiro’s final work on Murakami – his chapter here is one of the few works ever translated into English – to interviews with Murakami and discussions from his translators and editors, shedding light not only on Murakami’s works as literature but as products of cross-cultural exchanges. Murakami Haruki and Our Years of Pilgrimage will prove a valuable resource for students and scholars of Japanese studies, comparative and world literature, cultural studies, and beyond.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A History of European Literature

A History of European Literature

Murakami's 1Q84 (2009–10) is still more opaque in allegorical terms, even though most of it takes place in the alternative universe of the title. The allusion to Orwell is unambiguous in Japanese: the pronunciation of “Q” is the same as ...

Author: Walter Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191078910

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 560

View: 394

Walter Cohen argues that the history of European literature and each of its standard periods can be illuminated by comparative consideration of the different literary languages within Europe and by the ties of European literature to world literature. World literature is marked by recurrent, systematic features, outcomes of the way that language and literature are at once the products of major change and its agents. Cohen tracks these features from ancient times to the present, distinguishing five main overlapping stages. Within that framework, he shows that European literatures ongoing internal and external relationships are most visible at the level of form rather than of thematic statement or mimetic representation. European literature emerges from world literature before the birth of Europe — during antiquity, whose Classical languages are the heirs to the complex heritage of Afro-Eurasia. This legacy is later transmitted by Latin to the various vernaculars. The uniqueness of the process lies in the gradual displacement of the learned language by the vernacular, long dominated by Romance literatures. That development subsequently informs the second crucial differentiating dimension of European literature: the multicontinental expansion of its languages and characteristic genres, especially the novel, beginning in the Renaissance. This expansion ultimately results in the reintegration of European literature into world literature and thus in the creation of todays global literary system. The distinctiveness of European literature is to be found in these interrelated trajectories.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Idolizing authorship

Idolizing authorship

Navigating Literary Worlds: 1Q84 Although the novel consists of approximately a 1000 pages in the 2011 English translation, Strecher observes that Murakami's 1Q84 'may be summed up quite simply as the story of two soulmates, ...

Author: Rick Honings

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048528677

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 886

Though fame might be fickle, it is what drives contemporary culture. We live in a celebrity society, which revolves around movie stars, pop idols, political icons, and sport heroes. However, celebrity is not only reserved for the world of entertainment or popular culture. In literary history, too, celebrities can be found. Throughout the centuries, readers have idolized writers - for their extra-ordinary life styles, their shocking opinions, or their enigmatic personalities. These 'star authors' succeeded in creating their own branded identities and continue to offer influential models of identity construction. Though celebrity authorship has received a great deal of critical attention so far, there has been no broad overview of literary celebrity that combines authors from different nationalities, eras, and statures. This volume provides exactly this. It bundles insights from scholars with expertise in a variety of national literatures. Exploring both more and less known literary celebrities, all contributors analyse how authors create a public image, and how readers co-construct the celebrity image and allow it to circulate in the cultural domain. As a whole, the volume allows for transhistorical and transnational comparisons and offers intriguing new insights in the history of literary celebrity.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Making Identity Count

Making Identity Count

Novels Murakami, Haruki, 1Q84 Book 1-1 (Tokyo: Shincho, 2012). _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , 1Q84 Book 1-2 (Tokyo: Shincho, 2012). _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , 1Q84 Book 2-3 (Tokyo: Shincho, 2012). _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , 1Q84 Book 2-4 (Tokyo: Shincho, 2012).

Author: Ted Hopf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190255497

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 604

Constructivism, despite being one of the three main streams of IR theory, along with realism and liberalism, is rarely, if ever, tested in large-n quantitative work. Constructivists almost unanimously eschew quantitative approaches, assuming that variables of interest to constructivists, defy quantification. Quantitative scholars mostly ignore constructivist variables as too fuzzy and vague. And the rare instances in which quantitative scholars have operationalized identity as a variable, they have unfortunately realized all the constructivists' worst fears about reducing national identity to a single measure, such as language, religion, or ethnicity, thereby violating one of the foundational assumptions of constructivism: intersubjectivity. Making Identity Count presents a new method for the recovery of national identity, applies the method in 9 country cases, and draws conclusions from the empirical evidence for hegemonic transitions and a variety of quantitative theories of identity. Ted Hopf and Bentley B. Allan make the constructivist variable of national identity a valid measure that can be used by large-n International Relations scholars in a variety of ways. They lay out what is wrong with how identity has been conceptualized, operationalized and measured in quantitative IR so far and specify a methodological approach that allows scholars to recover the predominant national identities of states in a more valid and systematic fashion. The book includes "national identity reports" on China, the US, UK, Germany, France, Brazil, Japan, and India to both test the authors' method and demonstrate the promise of the approach. Hopf and Allan use these data to test a constructivist hypothesis about the future of Western neoliberal democratic hegemony. Finally, the book concludes with an assessment of the method, including areas of possible improvement, as well as a description of what an intersubjective national identity data base of great powers from 1810-2010 could mean for IR scholarship.
Categories: Political Science

The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami

The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami

“Ō o koroshita ato ni: Kindai to iu shisutemu ni aragau sakuhin 1Q84” [After killing the king: 1Q84 as a text that challenges the modern system]. In Murakami Haruki 1Q84 o dō yomu ka [How to read Murakami Haruki's 1Q84?], ...

Author: Matthew Carl Strecher

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452943060

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 412

In an “other world” composed of language—it could be a fathomless Martian well, a labyrinthine hotel or forest—a narrative unfolds, and with it the experiences, memories, and dreams that constitute reality for Haruki Murakami’s characters and readers alike. Memories and dreams in turn conjure their magical counterparts—people without names or pasts, fantastic animals, half-animals, and talking machines that traverse the dark psychic underworld of this writer’s extraordinary fiction. Fervently acclaimed worldwide, Murakami’s wildly imaginative work in many ways remains a mystery, its worlds within worlds uncharted territory. Finally in this book readers will find a map to the strange realm that grounds virtually every aspect of Murakami’s writing. A journey through the enigmatic and baffling innermost mind, a metaphysical dimension where Murakami’s most bizarre scenes and characters lurk, The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami exposes the psychological and mythological underpinnings of this other world. Matthew Carl Strecher shows how these considerations color Murakami’s depictions of the individual and collective soul, which constantly shift between the tangible and intangible but in this literary landscape are undeniably real. Through these otherworldly depths The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami also charts the writer’s vivid “inner world,” whether unconscious or underworld (what some Japanese critics call achiragawa, or “over there”), and its connectivity to language. Strecher covers all of Murakami’s work—including his efforts as a literary journalist—and concludes with the first full-length close reading of the writer’s newest novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Locating Heisei in Japanese Fiction and Film

Locating Heisei in Japanese Fiction and Film

Murakami Haruki 1Q84 wo dō yomu ka, edited by Kawade Shobō Shinsha, 13–18. Tokyo: Kawade. Dick, Philip K. 1962. The Man in the High Castle. New York: Putnam. Elias, Amy. 2001. Sublime Desire: History and Post-1960s Fiction.

Author: Marc Yamada

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000712438

Category: Social Science

Page: 166

View: 909

This book provides the first interdisciplinary examination of the popular fiction and film of the “lost decades” of Japan’s Heisei period (1989–2019). Presenting original analysis of major Heisei writers, filmmakers, and manga artists, the chapters examine the work of Urasawa Naoki, Kurosawa Kiyoshi, Murakami Haruki, and Shinkai Makoto, among others. Through the work of these cultural figures, the book also explores the struggle to define the history of Heisei—three decades of economic stagnation, social malaise, and natural disaster. In particular, it explores the dissonance between the dominant history of Japan’s recent past and the representation of this past in the popular imagination of the period. In so doing, this book argues that traumatic events from the years leading up to Heisei complicate the narration of a cohesive sense of history for the period, requiring works of fiction and film to explore new connections to the past. Incorporating literary and film theory to assess the works of culture, Locating Heisei in Japanese Fiction and Film will be useful to students and scholars of Japanese culture, society, and history.
Categories: Social Science

Thinking About Love

Thinking About Love

They each think the same words without expressing it aloud, “It was such a long time” (1Q84 907). Far from being cut off from Tengo in her own solipsistic world, Aomame hears everything that goes on in Tengo's heart, and so they must ...

Author: Diane Enns

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271076188

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 602

Does love command an ineffability that remains inaccessible to the philosopher? Thinking About Love considers the nature and experience of love through the writing of well-known Continental philosophers such as Hannah Arendt, Simone de Beauvoir, Jacques Derrida, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Evolving forms of social organization, rapid developments in the field of psychology, and novel variations on relationships demand new approaches to and ways of talking about love. Rather than offering prescriptive claims, this volume explores how one might think about the concept philosophically, without attempting to resolve or alleviate its ambiguities, paradoxes, and limitations. The essays focus on the contradictions and limits of love, manifested in such phenomena as trust, abuse, grief, death, violence, politics, and desire. An erudite examination of the many facets of love, this book fills a lacuna in the philosophy of this richly complicated topic. Along with the editors, the contributors are Sophie Bourgault, John Caruana, Christina M. Gschwandtner, Marguerite La Caze, Alphonso Lingis, Christian Lotz, Todd May, Dawne McCance, Dorothea Olkowski, Felix Ó Murchadha, Fiona Utley, and Mélanie Walton.
Categories: Philosophy

Asian Religions

Asian Religions

With 1Q84, the contemporary novelist Haruki Murakami ( ᖓ͊ ᓄឲ, b. 1949) returned to writing in his native language after a series of novels written in English. 1Q84 (in Japanese pronounced the same as the numbers 1-9-8-4, ...

Author: Randall L. Nadeau

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118471968

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 478

ASIAN RELIGIONS “A unique introduction to Asian religions, combining the scholarly rigor of an established historian of Asian religions with the willingness to engage empathetically with the traditions and to suggest that readers do the same.” Joseph A. Adler, Kenyon College “Randall L. Nadeau has accomplished what only a few have tried, but which has been much needed in the study of religions. He has written a genuinely novel approach to the religions of Asia… This is a work that should find its way into Asian humanities, history, religion, and civilization courses.” Ronnie Littlejohn, Belmont University This all-embracing introduction to Asian religious practices and beliefs takes a unique approach; not only does it provide a complete overview of the basic tenets of the major Asian religions, but it also demonstrates how Asian spiritualities are lived and practiced, exploring the meaning and significance they hold for believers. In a series of engaging and lively chapters, the book explores the beliefs and practices of Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Japanese religions, including Shintō. Using a comparative approach, it highlights the contrasts between Asian and Western modes of thinking and living, and debates the influence of religion on real-world issues including work, economic growth, the environment, human rights, and gender relations. Nadeau, a leading figure in this field, takes an empathetic approach to Asian religious and cultural traditions, and considers Asian spiritualities to be viable systems of belief for today’s global citizens. Integrating exercises, activities, and an appealing mixture of examples, such as novels and biographies, this refreshing book leads readers to an enhanced understanding of the ideas and practice of Asian religions, and of their continuing relevance today.
Categories: Religion

The Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literatures

The Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literatures

2010) and Haruki Murakami's 1Q84 (2009–2010) are two recent novels from Japan that do explicitly reference utopian traditions, while demonstrating inherently Japanese interpretations of the imaginary of the ideal.

Author: Peter Marks

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030886547

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 742

View: 680

The Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literatures celebrates a literary genre already over 500 years old. Specially commissioned essays from established and emerging international scholars reflect the vibrancy of utopian vision, and its resiliency as idea, genre, and critical mode. Covering politics, environment, geography, body and mind, and social organization, the volume surveys current research and maps new areas of study. The chapters include investigations of anarchism, biopolitics, and postcolonialism and study film, art, and literature. Each essay considers central questions and key primary works, evaluates the most recent research, and outlines contemporary debates. Literatures of Africa, Australia, China, Latin America, and the Middle East are discussed in this global, cross-disciplinary, and comprehensive volume.
Categories: Literary Criticism