Women Before the Bar

Gender, Law, and Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789

Author: Cornelia Hughes Dayton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780807822449

Category: Law

Page: 382

View: 9617

Little explores the stormy American relationship with the Middle East from World War II through the war in Iraq, focusing particularly on the complex and often inconsistent attitudes and interests that helped put the United States on a collision course with radical Islam early in the new millennium. After documenting the persistence of "orientalist" stereotypes in American popular culture, Little examines oil, Israel, and other aspects of U.S. policy. For this updated third edition, Little covers events through 2007, including a new chapter on the Bush Doctrine, demonstrating that in many important ways, George W. Bush's Middle Eastern policies mark a sharp break with the past.
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The Many Legalities of Early America

Author: Christopher L. Tomlins,Bruce H. Mann

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 3394

Many Legalities of Early America
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Eloquence is power

oratory & performance in early America

Author: Sandra M. Gustafson

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807825754

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 287

View: 8090

Sandra Gustafson examines the verbal art of speech in sacred, political and diplomatic forms as it was created and practiced in colonial America and the early republic. She demonstrates that, in the distinctly American interaction of cultures, contact and conflict among Europeans, native Americans, and Africans gave particular significance and complexity to the uses of the spoken word.
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Prospero's America

John Winthrop, Jr., Alchemy, and the Creation of New England Culture, 1606-1676

Author: Walter W. Woodward

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807895938

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8474

In Prospero's America, Walter W. Woodward examines the transfer of alchemical culture to America by John Winthrop, Jr., one of English colonization's early giants. Winthrop participated in a pan-European network of natural philosophers who believed alchemy could improve the human condition and hasten Christ's Second Coming. Woodward demonstrates the influence of Winthrop and his philosophy on New England's cultural formation: its settlement, economy, religious toleration, Indian relations, medical practice, witchcraft prosecution, and imperial diplomacy. Prospero's America reconceptualizes the significance of early modern science in shaping New England hand in hand with Puritanism and politics.
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Banished

Common Law and the Rhetoric of Social Exclusion in Early New England

Author: Nan Goodman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812206479

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 2282

A community is defined not only by inclusion but also by exclusion. Seventeenth-century New England Puritans, themselves exiled from one society, ruthlessly invoked the law of banishment from another: over time, hundreds of people were forcibly excluded from this developing but sparsely settled colony. Nan Goodman suggests that the methods of banishment rivaled—even overpowered—contractual and constitutional methods of inclusion as the means of defining people and place. The law and rhetoric that enacted the exclusion of certain parties, she contends, had the inverse effect of strengthening the connections and collective identity of those that remained. Banished investigates the practices of social exclusion and its implications through the lens of the period's common law. For Goodman, common law is a site of negotiation where the concepts of community and territory are more fluid and elastic than has previously been assumed for Puritan society. Her legal history brings fresh insight to well-known as well as more obscure banishment cases, including those of Anne Hutchinson, Roger Williams, Thomas Morton, the Quakers, and the Indians banished to Deer Island during King Philip's War. Many of these cases were driven less by the religious violations that may have triggered them than by the establishment of rules for membership in a civil society. Law provided a language for the Puritans to know and say who they were—and who they were not. Banished reveals the Puritans' previously neglected investment in the legal rhetoric that continues to shape our understanding of borders, boundaries, and social exclusion.
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Molly Bannaky

Author: Alice McGill,Chris K. Soentpiet

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780395722879

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 2448

Relates how Benjamin Banneker's grandmother journeyed from England to Maryland in the late seventeenth century, worked as an indentured servant, began a farm of her own, and married a freed slave.
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Engendered Death

Pennsylvania Women who Kill

Author: Joseph W. Laythe

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1611460921

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 8565

Engendered Death: Pennsylvania Women Who Kill is an historical and interdisciplinary study of women who kill in Pennsylvania from the 18th century to the present. It is not an examination of what motivates women to kill, although the reader may deduce that from the case studies included. Instead, it is an examination of how society perceives women who kill and how the gender-lens is applied to them throughout the legal process in the media and in the courtroom. What makes this work particularly unique is its combination of both scholarly analysis and narrative case studies. As such, it will appeal to both the scholar and the reader of true-crime non-fiction. If we are to recognize the complex variables at play in all criminal offenses, we will need to understand that the laws of a community, its social values, its politics, economics, and even geography play a factor in what laws are enforced and against whom they are enforced. The decision to define and label certain behaviors and certain people was based on social, political, and economic considerations of each community. Thus, the commission of murder by a woman in Arizona may have a variety of factors associated with it that are not present in the case of a woman who murdered her husband in Maine. This study, in part because of the volume of cases and in part to limit the variables affecting the cases, has limited its scope of women killers to the state of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania is the ideal state to study because of its long and stable legal and political traditions, its historically diverse population, and the large number of newspapers that will help us gauge the public's view of women and women who kill. By limiting our scope to one state, we know that the legal definitions are fairly consistent for all of the women during a certain period and we can more easily identify the shifts in social values regarding women and homicide.
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The Making of an American Community

A Case Study of Democracy in a Frontier County

Author: Merle E. Curti

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804705349

Category: Social Science

Page: 483

View: 4907

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INHERITING THE REVOLUTION

Author: Joyce Oldham Appleby

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674006631

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 1177

Details the experiences of the first generation of Americans who inherited the independent country, discussing the lives, businesses, and religious freedoms that transformed the country in its early years.
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Over the Threshold

Intimate Violence in Early America

Author: Christine Daniels,Michael V. Kennedy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135250235

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 3421

Over the Threshold is the first in-depth work to explore the topic of intimate violence in the American colonies and the early Republic. The essays examine domestic violence in both urban and frontier environments, between husbands and wives, parents and children, and masters and slaves. This compelling collection puts commonly held notions about intimate violence under strict historical scrutiny, often producing surprising results.
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Child Victims of Homicide

Author: Christine Alder,Ken Polk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521002516

Category: Social Science

Page: 187

View: 5927

This international 2001 study explores gender and familial patterns in cases of child homicide.
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Not All Wives

Women of Colonial Philadelphia

Author: Karin A. Wulf

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801437021

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 2268

This book uses such sources as tax lists, censuses, poor relief records, newspapers, correspondence, wills, almanacs, and poetry to discuss the daily experiences of Philadelphia women who were widowed, divorced, separated, or never married.
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A Storm of Witchcraft

The Salem Trials and the American Experience

Author: Emerson W. Baker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199385149

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 304

View: 1009

Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history. Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria--but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since. Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak--the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them--and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy. Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.
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Female Felons

Women and Serious Crime in Colonial Massaschusetts

Author: N. E. H. Hull

Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 171

View: 5707

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Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited

China, Japan, and the United States

Author: Joseph Tobin,Yeh Hsueh,Mayumi Karasawa

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226805050

Category: Education

Page: 280

View: 5706

Published twenty years ago, the original Preschool in Three Cultures was a landmark in the study of education: a profoundly enlightening exploration of the different ways preschoolers are taught in China, Japan, and the United States. Here, lead author Joseph Tobin—along with new collaborators Yeh Hsueh and Mayumi Karasawa—revisits his original research to discover how two decades of globalization and sweeping social transformation have affected the way these three cultures educate and care for their youngest pupils. Putting their subjects’ responses into historical perspective, Tobin, Hsueh, and Karasawa analyze the pressures put on schools to evolve and to stay the same, discuss how the teachers adapt to these demands, and examine the patterns and processes of continuity and change in each country. Featuring nearly one hundred stills from the videotapes, Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited artfully and insightfully illustrates the surprising, illuminating, and at times entertaining experiences of four-year-olds—and their teachers—on both sides of the Pacific.
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Pillars of Salt, Monuments of Grace

New England Crime Literature and the Origins of American Popular Culture, 1674-1860

Author: Daniel A. Cohen

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781558495296

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 350

View: 4743

In this innovative study, Daniel A. Cohen explores a major cultural shift embodied in hundreds of early New England crime publications. Tracing the declining authority of Puritan ministers, he shows how the arbiters of an increasingly pluralistic literary marketplace gradually supplanted pious execution sermons with last-speech broadsides, gallows verses, criminal autobiographies, trial reports, newspaper stories, and romantic docudramas. Pillars of Salt, Monuments of Grace probes the forgotten origins of our modern mass media's preoccupation with crime and punishment.
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Indigenous Women, Work, and History

1940-1980

Author: Mary Jane Logan McCallum

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN: 0887554326

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5196

When dealing with Indigenous women’s history we are conditioned to think about women as private-sphere figures, circumscribed by the home, the reserve, and the community. Moreover, in many ways Indigenous men and women have been cast in static, pre-modern, and one-dimensional identities, and their twentieth century experiences reduced to a singular story of decline and loss. In Indigenous Women, Work, and History, historian Mary Jane Logan McCallum rejects both of these long-standing conventions by presenting case studies of Indigenous domestic servants, hairdressers, community health representatives, and nurses working in “modern Native ways” between 1940 and 1980. Based on a range of sources, including the records of the Departments of Indian Affairs and National Health and Welfare, interviews, and print and audio-visual media, McCallum shows how state-run education and placement programs were part of Canada’s larger vision of assimilation and extinguishment of treaty obligations. Conversely, she also shows how Indigenous women link these same programs to their social and cultural responsibilities of community building and state resistance. By placing the history of these modern workers within a broader historical context of Aboriginal education and health, federal labour programs, post-war Aboriginal economic and political developments, and Aboriginal professional organizations, McCallum challenges us to think about Indigenous women’s history in entirely new ways.
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Suffering Childhood in Early America

Violence, Race, and the Making of the Child Victim

Author: Anna Mae Duane

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820340588

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 9903

Nothing tugs on American heartstrings more than an image of a suffering child. Anna Mae Duane goes back to the nation's violent beginnings to examine how the ideal of childhood in early America was fundamental to forging concepts of ethnicity, race, and gender. Duane argues that children had long been used to symbolize subservience, but in the New World those old associations took on more meaning. Drawing on a wide range of early American writing, she explores how the figure of a suffering child accrued political weight as the work of infantilization connected the child to Native Americans, slaves, and women. In the making of the young nation, the figure of the child emerged as a vital conceptual tool for coming to terms with the effects of cultural and colonial violence, and with time childhood became freighted with associations of vulnerability, suffering, and victimhood. As Duane looks at how ideas about the child and childhood were manipulated by the colonizers and the colonized alike, she reveals a powerful line of colonizing logic in which dependence and vulnerability are assigned great emotional weight. When early Americans sought to make sense of intercultural contact—and the conflict that often resulted—they used the figure of the child to help displace their own fear of lost control and shifting power.
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