This Place, These People

Life and Shadow on the Great Plains

Author: David Stark

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231165226

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 1968

The numbers of farms and farmers on the Great Plains are dwindling. Disappearing even faster are the farm places -- the houses, barns, and outbuildings that made the rural landscape a place of habitation. Nancy Warner's photographs tell the stories of buildings that were once loved yet have now been abandoned. Her evocative images are juxtaposed with the voices of Nebraska farm people, lovingly recorded by sociologist David Stark. These plainspoken recollections tell of a way of life that continues to evolve in the face of wrenching change. Warner's spare, formal photographs invite readers to listen to the cadences and tough-minded humor of everyday speech in the Great Plains. Stark's afterword grounds the project in the historical relationship between people and their land. In the tradition of Wright Morris, this combination of words and images is both art and document, evoking memories, emotions, and questions for anyone with rural American roots.
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Handbook on the Geographies of Energy

Author: Barry D. Solomon,Kirby E. Calvert

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1785365622

Category:

Page: 576

View: 6347

This extensive Handbook captures a range of expertise and perspectives on the changing geographies and landscapes of energy production, distribution, and use. Combining established and emerging scholarship from across disciplines, the expert contributions provide a broad overview of research frontiers for the changing geographies of energy worldwide. Interdisciplinary in nature and broad in scope, it serves to answer a range of questions and provide the reader with conceptual and methodological foundations.
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Drift

Illicit Mobility and Uncertain Knowledge

Author: Jeff Ferrell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520295552

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 4469

“This book was written late in the North American night, with the rumbling thuds and booming train horns of the nearby rail yard echoing through my windows, reminding me of the train hoppers and gutter punks out there rolling through the darkness.” In Drift, Jeff Ferrell shows how dislocation and disorientation can become phenomena in their own right. Examining the history of drifting, Ferrell situates the contemporary global phenomenon of drift within today’s economic, social, and cultural dynamics. He also highlights a distinctly North American form of drift—that of the train-hopping hobo—by tracing the hobo’s political history and by sharing his own immersion in the world of contemporary train-hoppers. Along the way, Ferrell sheds light on the ephemeral intensity of drifting communities and explores the contested politics of drift—the legal and political strategies designed to control drifters in the interest of economic development, the irony by which these strategies spawn further social and spatial exclusion, and the ways in which drifters and those who embrace drift create their own slippery strategies of resistance. With an eye toward the truth, Ferrell keenly argues that the lessons of drift can provide us with new models for knowing and engaging with the world around us.
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The Sense of Dissonance

Accounts of Worth in Economic Life

Author: David Stark

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400831005

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 8473

What counts? In work, as in other areas of life, it is not always clear what standards we are being judged by or how our worth is being determined. This can be disorienting and disconcerting. Because of this, many organizations devote considerable resources to limiting and clarifying the logics used for evaluating worth. But as David Stark argues, firms would often be better off, especially in managing change, if they allowed multiple logics of worth and did not necessarily discourage uncertainty. In fact, in many cases multiple orders of worth are unavoidable, so organizations and firms should learn to harness the benefits of such "heterarchy" rather than seeking to purge it. Stark makes this argument with ethnographic case studies of three companies attempting to cope with rapid change: a machine-tool company in late and postcommunist Hungary, a new-media startup in New York during and after the collapse of the Internet bubble, and a Wall Street investment bank whose trading room was destroyed on 9/11. In each case, the friction of competing criteria of worth promoted an organizational reflexivity that made it easier for the company to change and deal with market uncertainty. Drawing on John Dewey's notion that "perplexing situations" provide opportunities for innovative inquiry, Stark argues that the dissonance of diverse principles can lead to discovery.
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Shadows on the Rock

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307805263

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 5488

Willa Cather's novel of seventeenth-century Quebec is a luminous evocation of North American origins, and of the men and women who struggled to adapt to a new world even as they clung to the artifacts and manners of one they left behind. In 1697, Quebec is an island of French civilization perched on a bare gray rock amid a wilderness of trackless forests. For many of its settlers, Quebec is a place of exile, so remote that an entire winter passes without a word from home. But to twelve-year-old Cécile Auclair, the rock is home, where even the formidable Governor Frontenac entertains children in his palace and beavers lie beside the lambs in a Christmas créche. As Cather follows this devout and resourceful child over the course of a year, she re-creates the continent as it must have appeared to its first European inhabitants. And she gives us a spellbinding work of historical fiction in which great events occur first as rumors and then as legends—and in which even the most intimate domestic scenes are suffused with a sense of wonder. BONUS: The edition includes an excerpt from The Selected Letters of Willa Cather.
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Shadows on the Grass

Author: Isak Dinesen,Karen Blixen

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961465

Category: Fiction

Page: 144

View: 8953

Isak Dinesen takes up the absorbing story of her life in Kenya begun in the unforgettable Out of Africa, which she published under the name of Karen Blixen. With warmth and humanity these four stories illuminate her love both for the African people, their dignity and traditions, and for the beauty and wildness of the landscape. The first three were written in the 1950s and the last, 'Echoes from the Hills', was written especially for this volume in the summer of 1960 when the author was in her seventies. In all they provide a moving final chapter to her African reminiscences.
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The Modern Pulpit

Sermons Delivered by Ministers of Various Denominations in 1902

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Brooklyn (New York, N.Y.)

Page: 87

View: 1324

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The Plains Indian Photographs of Edward S. Curtis

Author: Edward S. Curtis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803215122

Category: Photography

Page: 81

View: 6401

The traditional cultures of the Indians of the Great Plains?Lakotas, Cheyennes, Wichitas, Arikaras, Crows, Osages, Assiniboins, Comanches, Crees, and Mandans, among others?are recalled in stunning detail in this collection of photographs by Edward S. Curtis (1868?1952). Curtis is the best-known photographer of Native Americans because of his monumental work, The North American Indian (1907?1930), which consists of twenty portfolios of large photogravures and twenty volumes of text on more than eighty Indian groups in the West. He took pictures of Plains Indians for over twenty years, and his photographs reflect both prevailing attitudes about Indians and Curtis's own vision of differences among the Native peoples whom he photographed. ø Curtis's photographs have exerted an enduring influence?both positive and negative?on mainstream American culture. They have inspired countless books, articles, and photographic exhibitions, and they continue to appear on posters, postcards, and other souvenirs. Accompanying the remarkable array of images in this book are essays by leading scholars that place the photographs within their proper critical, cultural, and historical contexts. The scholars contributing to this work are Martha H. Kennedy, Martha A. Sandweiss, Mick Gidley, and Duane Niatum.
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In the Shadow of the Sun

Author: Anne Sibley O'Brien

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN: 0545905761

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 336

View: 5238

North Korea is known as the most repressive country on Earth, with a dictatorial leader, a starving population, and harsh punishment for rebellion. Not the best place for a family vacation. Yet that's exactly where Mia Andrews finds herself, on a tour with her aid-worker father and fractious older brother, Simon. Mia was adopted from South Korea as a baby, and the trip raises tough questions about where she really belongs. Then her dad is arrested for spying, just as forbidden photographs of North Korean slave-labor camps fall into Mia's hands. The only way to save Dad: get the pictures out of the country. Thus Mia and Simon set off on a harrowing journey to the border, without food, money, or shelter, in a land where anyone who sees them might turn them in, and getting caught could mean prison -- or worse. An exciting adventure that offers a rare glimpse into a compelling, complicated nation, In the Shadow of the Sun is an unforgettable novel of courage and survival.
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Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547840608

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1412

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance — ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” — San Francisco Chronicle "A riveting biography of an American original." – Boston Globe
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American Indian Places

A Historical Guidebook

Author: Frances H. Kennedy

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780395633366

Category: Social Science

Page: 335

View: 5456

Organized geographically and including detailed descriptions, location information, maps, and color photographs, a historical resource profiles more than 350 locations that are significant to American Indians and open to the public, including New York's Ganondagan State Historic Site, Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Illinois, and Idaho's Nez Perce National Historical Park.
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Ask Alice

A Novel

Author: D. J. Taylor

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453226109

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 2052

A literary tour-de-force ranging from the American frontier to the decadent carousing of the bright young people of London’s Jazz Age “A clever, stylish entertainment with dark undercurrents, set in the first third of the 20th century, Ask Alice traces the rise of an orphaned Kansas girl from pretty young thing on the prairie to bright young thing in 1920s London to society hostess in the ’30s. Taylor—a British novelist and biographer of Thackeray and Orwell—alternates point of view between the woman and a boy of uncertain parentage. The book has all the makings of Victorian high drama—a slew of colorful characters, vivid and varied scenes, precipitous changes in fortune, and inescapable revelations of long-buried secrets.” —The Atlantic Monthly
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Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416597158

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8903

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S.C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.
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American Gardening

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Gardening

Page: N.A

View: 8481

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Where the Dead Sit Talking

Author: Brandon Hobson

Publisher: Soho Press

ISBN: 1616958871

Category: FICTION

Page: 288

View: 6793

Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, Where the Dead Sit Talking is a startling, authentically voiced and lyrically written Native American coming-of-age story. With his single mother in jail, Sequoyah, a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy, is placed in foster care with the Troutt family. Literally and figuratively scarred by his mother's years of substance abuse, Sequoyah keeps mostly to himself, living with his emotions pressed deep below the surface. At least until he meets seventeen-year-old Rosemary, another youth staying with the Troutts. Sequoyah and Rosemary bond over their shared Native American background and tumultuous paths through the foster care system, but as Sequoyah's feelings toward Rosemary deepen, the precariousness of their lives and the scars of their pasts threaten to undo them both.
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The House of Broken Angels

Author: Luis Alberto Urrea

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316516252

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 3133

From a Pulitzer Prize finalist comes a powerful and unforgettable portrait of one Mexican American family and the American dream "One of the most vivid and engrossing family epics of the last twenty years."--Dave Eggers One of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018: Entertainment Weekly, Southern Living, The Millions, Chicago Review of Books, Bustle, Nylon, Book Riot, BookBub, San Francisco Weekly "All we do, mija, is love. Love is the answer. Nothing stops it. Not borders. Not death." In his final days, beloved and ailing patriarch Miguel Angel de La Cruz, affectionately called Big Angel, has summoned his entire clan for one last legendary birthday party. But as the party approaches, his mother, nearly one hundred, dies herself, leading to a farewell doubleheader in a single weekend. Among the guests is Big Angel's half brother, known as Little Angel, who must reckon with the truth that although he shares a father with his siblings, he has not, as a half gringo, shared a life. Across two bittersweet days in their San Diego neighborhood, the revelers mingle among the palm trees and cacti, celebrating the lives of Big Angel and his mother, and recounting the many inspiring tales that have passed into family lore, the acts both ordinary and heroic that brought these citizens to a fraught and sublime country and allowed them to flourish in the land they have come to call home. The story of the de La Cruzes is the quintessential American story. This indelible portrait of a complex family reminds us of what it means to be the first generation and to live two lives across one border. It takes us into a world we have not known, while reflecting back the hopes and dreams of our own families. Teeming with brilliance and humor, authentic at every turn, The House of Broken Angels is Luis Alberto Urrea at his best, and cements his reputation as a storyteller of the first rank.
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