The Uprooted

The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People

Author: Oscar Handlin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812217889

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 7462

Awarded the 1952 Pulitzer Prize in history, The Uprooted chronicles the common experiences of the millions of European immigrants who came to America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—their fears, their hopes, their expectations. The New Yorker called it "strong stuff, handled in a masterly and quite moving way," while the New York Times suggested that "The Uprooted is history with a difference—the difference being its concerns with hearts and souls no less than an event." The book inspired a generation of research in the history of American immigration, but because it emphasizes the depressing conditions faced by immigrants, focuses almost entirely on European peasants, and does not claim to provide a definitive answer to the causes of American immigration, its great value as a well-researched and readable description of the emotional experiences of immigrants, and its ability to evoke the time and place of America at the turn of a century, have sometimes been overlooked. Recognized today as a foundational text in immigration studies, this edition contains a new preface by the author.
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The Time of the Uprooted

Author: Elie Wiesel

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0805211772

Category: Fiction

Page: 299

View: 617

Tormented by feelings of loss and dispossession after spending his life fleeing first the Nazis and then the 1956 Russian invasion of Hungary, Gamaliel Friedman finally settles in New York, where he works as a ghostwriter and meets a fellow group of exiles, which includes a rabbi whose mystical beliefs finally offer him a chance to reconcile with the past. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.
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The Uprooted

A Hitler Legacy

Author: Dorit Bader Whiteman,Dorit Whiteman

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 9780738212074

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 1167

Whiteman, who escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria with her family, is now a clinical psychologist in New York. Her impassioned, riveting study of the Jews who managed to leave Germany and Austria before Hitler implemented mass executions and death camps is based partly on interviews with 190 escapees. She tells the incredible story of the Kindertransport operation, which took 10,000 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied countries to England by train and ferry. Adolf Eichmann, then an emigration official, disdainfully approved this mass exodus. We learn of the formidable barriers escapees faced in getting out, of horrid or supportive foster homes, of the trauma and pain of being forcibly uprooted. Many escapees endured years of poverty before re-establihsing themselves. Whiteman rejects Hannah Arendt's thesis that German Jews' cultural assimilation led to their political blindness in a "fool's paradise." This is a distinctive contribution to Holocaust literature.
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The Uprooted

Improving Humanitarian Responses to Forced Migration

Author: Susan F. Martin

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739110836

Category: Political Science

Page: 294

View: 559

The Uprooted is the first volume to methodically examine the progress and persistent shortcomings of the current humanitarian regime. The authors, all experts in the field of forced migration, describe the organizational, political, and conceptual shortcomings that are creating the gaps and inefficiencies of international and national agencies to reach entire categories of forced migrants. They make policy-based recommendations to improve international, regional, national, and local responses in areas including organization, security, funding, and durability of response.
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Uprooted

A Novel

Author: Naomi Novik

Publisher: Del Rey

ISBN: 0804179042

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 1230

WINNER OF THE NEBULA AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL • Naomi Novik, author of the New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed Temeraire novels, introduces a bold new world rooted in folk stories and legends, as elemental as a Grimm fairy tale. HUGO AWARD FINALIST • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR | BuzzFeed | Tordotcom | BookPage | Library Journal | Publishers Weekly “Uprooted is confidently wrought and sympathetically cast. I might even call it bewitching.”—Gregory Maguire, bestselling author of Wicked and Egg & Spoon “Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.” Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood. The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose. Praise for Uprooted “Uprooted has leapt forward to claim the title of Best Book I’ve Read Yet This Year. . . . Moving, heartbreaking, and thoroughly satisfying, Uprooted is the fantasy novel I feel I’ve been waiting a lifetime for. Clear your schedule before picking it up, because you won’t want to put it down.”—NPR
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Words of the Uprooted

Jewish Immigrants in Early Twentieth-Century America

Author: Robert A. Rockaway

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501724630

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 3715

American Jewish leaders, many of German extraction, created the Industrial Removal Office (IRO) in 1901 in order to disperse unemployed Jewish immigrants from New York City to smaller Jewish communities throughout the United States. The IRO was designed to help refugees from persecution in the Pale of Russia find jobs and community support and, secondarily, to reduce the Manhattan ghettoes and minimize antisemitism. In twenty-one years, the IRO distributed seventy-nine thousand East European Jews to over fifteen hundred cities and towns, including Chino, California; Des Moines, Iowa; and Pensacola, Florida. Wherever they went, these twice-displaced immigrants wrote letters to the IRO's main office. Robert A. Rockaway has selected, and translated from Yiddish, letters that describe the immigrants' new surroundings, work conditions, and living situations, as well as letters that give voice to typical tensions between the immigrants and their benefactors. Rockaway introduces the letters with an essay on conditions in the Pale and on early American Jewish attempts to assist emigrants.
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Uprooted

How Breslau Became Wroclaw during the Century of Expulsions

Author: Gregor Thum

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400839964

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 3571

With the stroke of a pen at the Potsdam Conference following the Allied victory in 1945, Breslau, the largest German city east of Berlin, became the Polish city of Wroclaw. Its more than six hundred thousand inhabitants--almost all of them ethnic Germans--were expelled and replaced by Polish settlers from all parts of prewar Poland. Uprooted examines the long-term psychological and cultural consequences of forced migration in twentieth-century Europe through the experiences of Wroclaw's Polish inhabitants. In this pioneering work, Gregor Thum tells the story of how the city's new Polish settlers found themselves in a place that was not only unfamiliar to them but outright repellent given Wroclaw's Prussian-German appearance and the enormous scope of wartime destruction. The immediate consequences were an unstable society, an extremely high crime rate, rapid dilapidation of the building stock, and economic stagnation. This changed only after the city's authorities and a new intellectual elite provided Wroclaw with a Polish founding myth and reshaped the city's appearance to fit the postwar legend that it was an age-old Polish city. Thum also shows how the end of the Cold War and Poland's democratization triggered a public debate about Wroclaw's "amputated memory." Rediscovering the German past, Wroclaw's Poles reinvented their city for the second time since World War II. Uprooted traces the complex historical process by which Wroclaw's new inhabitants revitalized their city and made it their own.
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The Uprooted

Race, Children, and Imperialism in French Indochina, 1890-1980

Author: Christina Elizabeth Firpo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780824847579

Category: Eurasians

Page: 288

View: 9136

For over a century French officials in Indochina systematically uprooted metis children - those born of Southeast Asian mothers and white, African, or Indian fathers - from their homes. In many cases, and for a wide range of reasons - death, divorce, the end of a romance, a return to France, or because the birth was the result of rape - the father had left the child in the mother's care. Although the program succeeded in rescuing homeless children from life on the streets, for those in their mothers' care it was disastrous. Citing an 1889 French law and claiming that raising children in the Southeast Asian cultural milieu was tantamount to abandonment, colonial officials sought permanent, 'protective' custody of the children. The Uprooted offers an in-depth investigation of the colony's child-removal program: the motivations behind it, reception of it, and resistance to it.
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The Uprooted

The Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American People

Author: Oscar Handlin

Publisher: Singapore Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Acculturation

Page: 320

View: 8584

From the author of The Indian in the Cupboard and The L-Shaped Room comes a fascinating story of a wartime childhood, heavily influenced by her own experience. In 1940 as war rages across Europe, ten-year-old Lindy, waves goodbye to England and makes the long journey to Saskatoon, Canada, along with her Mother and her cousin Cameron. They may be far from the war but they are also far from home and everyone they know and love. Life in Canada is very different but it is also full of exciting new adventures... This captivating story is inspired by Lynne Reid Banks' own childhood experience and her time in Canada.
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Uprooted

How 3000 Years of Jewish Civilization in the Arab World Vanished Overnight

Author: Lyn Julius

Publisher: Vallentine Mitchell

ISBN: 9781910383667

Category:

Page: 368

View: 2425

Who are the Jews from Arab countries? What were relations with Muslims like? What made Jews leave countries where they had been settled for thousands of years? What lessons can we learn from the mass exodus of minorities from the Middle East? Lyn Julius undertakes to answer all these questions and more in Uprooted, the culmination of ten years of work studying these issues. Jews lived continuously in the Middle East and North Africa for almost 3,000 years. Yet, in just 50 years, their indigenous communities outside Palestine almost totally disappeared as more than 99 percent of the Jewish population fled. Those with foreign passports and connections generally left for Europe, Australia, or the Americas. Some 650,000-including a minority of ideological Zionists-went to Israel. Before the Holocaust they constituted ten percent of the world's Jewish population, and now over 50 percent of Israel's Jews are refugees from Arab and Muslim countries, or their descendants. This same process is now repeating in Christian and other minority communities across the Middle East. This book also assesses how well these Jews have integrated into Israel and how their struggles have been politicized. It charts the growing clamour for recognition, redress and memorialization for these Jewish refugees, and looks at how their cause can contribute to peace and reconciliation between Israel and the Muslim world. *** "Lyn Julius provides a riveting account of a fascinating, but disgracefully overlooked subject. Anyone who really wants to understand the Middle East, Israel and world history, should read it." --Tom Gross, former Middle East correspondent, Sunday Telegraph; contributor to The Guardian and Wall Street Journal[Subject: Middle East Studies, Jewish Studies, History, Sociology, Politics]
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The uprooted

Author: Charles Paul May

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Pr

ISBN: 9780664325916

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 8270

Traces America's role in the forced migration of minorities from the forced importation of conscripts and indentured servants in colonial days to the present day evacuation of urban dwellers.
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The Uprooted

From the Old World to the New

Author: Oscar Handlin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Acculturation

Page: 310

View: 5047

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Spinning Silver

Author: Naomi Novik

Publisher: Del Rey

ISBN: 0399181008

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 3847

A fresh and imaginative retelling of the Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale from the bestselling author of Uprooted, which was hailed as “a very enjoyable fantasy with the air of a modern classic” by The New York Times Book Review. With the Nebula Award–winning Uprooted, Naomi Novik opened a brilliant new chapter in an already acclaimed career, delving into the magic of fairy tales to craft a love story that was both timeless and utterly of the now. Spinning Silver draws readers deeper into this glittering realm of fantasy, where the boundary between wonder and terror is thinner than a breath, and safety can be stolen as quickly as a kiss. Miryem is the daughter and granddaughter of moneylenders, but her father’s inability to collect his debts has left his family on the edge of poverty—until Miryem takes matters into her own hands. Hardening her heart, the young woman sets out to claim what is owed and soon gains a reputation for being able to turn silver into gold. When an ill-advised boast draws the attention of the king of the Staryk—grim fey creatures who seem more ice than flesh—Miryem’s fate, and that of two kingdoms, will be forever altered. Set an impossible challenge by the nameless king, Miryem unwittingly spins a web that draws in a peasant girl, Wanda, and the unhappy daughter of a local lord who plots to wed his child to the dashing young tsar. But Tsar Mirnatius is not what he seems. And the secret he hides threatens to consume the lands of humans and Staryk alike. Torn between deadly choices, Miryem and her two unlikely allies embark on a desperate quest that will take them to the limits of sacrifice, power, and love. Channeling the vibrant heart of myth and fairy tale, Spinning Silver weaves a multilayered, magical tapestry that readers will want to return to again and again. Advance praise for Spinning Silver “A book as cool and mysterious as a winter’s night, with two marvelous heroines at its heart. Spinning Silver pits the cold of endless winter against the fires of duty, love, and sacrifice. I couldn’t put it down.”—Katherine Arden, New York Times bestselling author of The Bear and the Nightingale “Naomi Novik knows how to weave words into magic, and Spinning Silver enchants the reader from the first page. This magnificent tale of three courageous young women who find the power to change their fates will catch you in its spell and linger long after the last chapter is read.”—Christina Henry, nationally bestselling author of The Mermaid
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The Warmth of Other Suns

The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Author: Isabel Wilkerson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679763880

Category: Social Science

Page: 622

View: 6564

Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
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The uprooted

agony and triumph among the debris of war

Author: Kanty Cooper

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 6259

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The Uprooted

The Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American People

Author: Oscar Handlin

Publisher: Singapore Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Acculturation

Page: 320

View: 9938

From the author of The Indian in the Cupboard and The L-Shaped Room comes a fascinating story of a wartime childhood, heavily influenced by her own experience. In 1940 as war rages across Europe, ten-year-old Lindy, waves goodbye to England and makes the long journey to Saskatoon, Canada, along with her Mother and her cousin Cameron. They may be far from the war but they are also far from home and everyone they know and love. Life in Canada is very different but it is also full of exciting new adventures... This captivating story is inspired by Lynne Reid Banks' own childhood experience and her time in Canada.
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Uprooted

The Japanese American Experience During World War II

Author: Albert Marrin

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 0553509365

Category: YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION

Page: 256

View: 3339

Discusses the internment of Japanese American citizens during the Second World War.
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Uprooted

The Unheard Story

Author: Tulsa

Publisher: Dorrance Publishing

ISBN: 1480909114

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 100

View: 1797

Uprooted: The Unheard Story by Tulsa Uprooted tells the story of the Bhutanese people of Nepali origin who were evicted from their homeland, through the eyes of Goshi, a native Bhutanese woman. The story follows Goshi from her childhood in a small village in Bhutan, to her adolescence and schooling, and finally into her adulthood, all the while giving insight and understanding into the events leading up to the exile of the Bhutanese people. She tells of their endurance and resilience, challenges and hardships; of how over a 100,000 of these people were marginalized from being part of a multicultural society and forced to flee the only home they knew to live as refugees in camps in eastern Nepal for seventeen years starting late 1980s. It is the tale of youths trying to blend and fit, torn between conformity and deviance, and the adults' struggle to adjust in a different socio - cultural environment. After being resettled to various countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Netherland, Norway and the United Kingdom in 2008, these people were forced to overcome a host of challenges that come with settling in a completely new environment. Most importantly, this book helps in bringing out the refugees' side of the story on how a large portion of the Bhutanese population were evicted almost overnight, and what stress the people went through when displaced from the only home known to them. About the Author Born the fifth of ten children, Tulsa was raised in Dagapela of Southern Bhutan by her farmer parents. She is one among the thousands of Bhutanese of Nepali origin, who were uprooted from their home and hearth. Having fled the country in January 1992, she lived in exile in Nepal for seventeen years. She, her husband, and their two children have since resettled and have been residents of the United States of America here since September 2008. Her passion for writing, along with her specializations in Sociology and Political Science, allowed her to write this book. She hopes this book will be of special interest to not only the whole former refugee community now scattered across the world, but also to those responsible for relocation and settlement in America and other countries. Apart from her full-time job, Tulsa enjoys reading, cooking, listening to music, yoga, and occasional knitting, as well as spending time with the community elders to converse in English, the language of their new home.
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The Uprooted

Hungarian Refugees and Their Impact on Hungary's Domestic Politics, 1918-1921

Author: István I. Mócsy

Publisher: East European Monographs

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 4415

This collection of short stories focuses on the Scottish civil war of 1644-45, in which the Marquis of Montrose led his royalist forces in a series of stunning victories against the odds before his final defeat at Philiphaugh. Each of Hogg's five tales centres on one of the five major battles of Montrose's brilliant but ultimately futile campaign. Each tale is utterly different from the others in genre and tone, but taken together they build up a composite picture of what it was like to experience the 'anarchy and confusion' of the time at first hand.
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The uprooted

refugees and the United States : a multidisciplinary teaching guide

Author: David M. Donahue,Nancy Flowers

Publisher: Hunter House Publishers

ISBN: 9780897931229

Category: Education

Page: 210

View: 5452

As the global community shrinks, the U.S. grows in ethnic and cultural diversity. A sensitivity to this diversity is crucial for todays society. The Uprooted helps students middle school age and older to understand the plight of refugees through activities that provide information, build empathy, and stimulate social action. Featuring 35 black-and-white photographs, this is a multidisciplinary teaching guide on one of the most pressing contemporary issues.
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