The Rise and Fall of the Caucasian Race

A Political History of Racial Identity

Author: Bruce Baum

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814739433

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9113

The term “Caucasian” is a curious invention of the modern age. Originating in 1795, the word identifies both the peoples of the Caucasus Mountains region as well as those thought to be “Caucasian”. Bruce Baum explores the history of the term and the category of the “Caucasian race” more broadly in the light of the changing politics of racial theory and notions of racial identity. With a comprehensive sweep that encompasses the understanding of "race" even before the use of the term “Caucasian,” Baum traces the major trends in scientific and intellectual understandings of “race” from the Middle Ages to the present day. Baum’s conclusions make an unprecedented attempt to separate modern science and politics from a long history of racial classification. He offers significant insights into our understanding of race and how the “Caucasian race” has been authoritatively invented, embraced, displaced, and recovered throughout our history.
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The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620111

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 947

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.
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Racially writing the republic

racists, race rebels, and transformations of American identity

Author: Bruce David Baum

Publisher: Duke University Press Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 5697

Investigates the history of U.S. political thought, dreams, and national identity by foregrounding the debasing role of race and racialized identities in constructions and transformations of what it has meant to be American.
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Color in the Classroom

How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

Author: Zoe Burkholder

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199876967

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 9530

Between the turn of the twentieth century and the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954, the way that American schools taught about "race" changed dramatically. This transformation was engineered by the nation's most prominent anthropologists, including Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead, during World War II. Inspired by scientific racism in Nazi Germany, these activist scholars decided that the best way to fight racial prejudice was to teach what they saw as the truth about race in the institution that had the power to do the most good-American schools. Anthropologists created lesson plans, lectures, courses, and pamphlets designed to revise what they called "the 'race' concept" in American education. They believed that if teachers presented race in scientific and egalitarian terms, conveying human diversity as learned habits of culture rather than innate characteristics, American citizens would become less racist. Although nearly forgotten today, this educational reform movement represents an important component of early civil rights activism that emerged alongside the domestic and global tensions of wartime. Drawing on hundreds of first-hand accounts written by teachers nationwide, Zo? Burkholder traces the influence of this anthropological activism on the way that teachers understood, spoke, and taught about race. She explains how and why teachers readily understood certain theoretical concepts, such as the division of race into three main categories, while they struggled to make sense of more complex models of cultural diversity and structural inequality. As they translated theories into practice, teachers crafted an educational discourse on race that differed significantly from the definition of race produced by scientists at mid-century. Schoolteachers and their approach to race were put into the spotlight with the Brown v. Board of Education case, but the belief that racially integrated schools would eradicate racism in the next generation and eliminate the need for discussion of racial inequality long predated this. Discussions of race in the classroom were silenced during the early Cold War until a new generation of antiracist, "multicultural" educators emerged in the 1970s.
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Becoming Multicultural

Immigration and the Politics of Membership in Canada and Germany

Author: Triadafilos Triadafilopoulos

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 077481568X

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2189

During the first half of the twentieth century, Canada and Germany’s responses to questions of national membership consisted of discriminatory policies aimed at harnessing migration for economic ends. Yet, by the end of the century, both countries were transformed into highly diverse multicultural societies. How did this remarkable shift come about? Triadafilopoulos argues that, after the war, global human rights norms intersected with domestic political identities and institutions, opening the way for the liberalization of Canada and Germany’s immigration and citizenship policies. His is a thought-provoking analysis that sheds light on the dynamics of membership politics and policy making in contemporary liberal-democratic countries.
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Multiple Identities

Migrants, Ethnicity, and Membership

Author: Paul R. Spickard

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253008115

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 6481

In recent years, Europeans have engaged in sharp debates about migrants and minority groups as social problems. The discussions usually neglect who these people are, how they live their lives, and how they identify themselves. Multiple Identities describes how migrants and minorities of all age groups experience their lives and manage complex, often multiple, identities, which alter with time and changing circumstances. The contributors consider minorities who have received a lot of attention, such as Turkish Germans, and some who have received little, such as Kashubians and Tartars in Poland and Chinese in Switzerland. They also examine international adoption and cross-cultural relationships and discuss some models for multicultural success.
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The Genius of Democracy

Fictions of Gender and Citizenship in the United States, 1860-1945

Author: Victoria Olwell

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204972

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 4464

In the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century United States, ideas of genius did more than define artistic and intellectual originality. They also provided a means for conceptualizing women's participation in a democracy that marginalized them. Widely distributed across print media but reaching their fullest development in literary fiction, tropes of female genius figured types of subjectivity and forms of collective experience that were capable of overcoming the existing constraints on political life. The connections between genius, gender, and citizenship were important not only to contests over such practical goals as women's suffrage but also to those over national membership, cultural identity, and means of political transformation more generally. In The Genius of Democracy Victoria Olwell uncovers the political uses of genius, challenging our dominant narratives of gendered citizenship. She shows how American fiction catalyzed political models of female genius, especially in the work of Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Mary Hunter Austin, Jessie Fauset, and Gertrude Stein. From an American Romanticism that saw genius as the ability to mediate individual desire and collective purpose to later scientific paradigms that understood it as a pathological individual deviation that nevertheless produced cultural progress, ideas of genius provided a rich language for contests over women's citizenship. Feminist narratives of female genius projected desires for a modern public life open to new participants and new kinds of collaboration, even as philosophical and scientific ideas of intelligence and creativity could often disclose troubling and more regressive dimensions. Elucidating how ideas of genius facilitated debates about political agency, gendered identity, the nature of consciousness, intellectual property, race, and national culture, Olwell reveals oppositional ways of imagining women's citizenship, ways that were critical of the conceptual limits of American democracy as usual.
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Métis

Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood

Author: Chris Andersen

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774827238

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 418

Ask any Canadian what "Métis" means, and they will likely say "mixed race." Canadians consider Métis mixed in ways that other Indigenous people are not, and the census and courts have premised their recognition of Métis status on this race-based understanding. Andersen argues that Canada got it wrong. From its roots deep in the colonial past, the idea of Métis as mixed has slowly pervaded the Canadian consciousness until it settled in the realm of common sense. In the process, "Métis" has become a racial category rather than the identity of an Indigenous people with a shared sense of history and culture.
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The relationship between race and culture in Enlightenment thought

Author: Nejla Demirkaya

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3668739684

Category: History

Page: 24

View: 2006

Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject History Europe - Other Countries - Middle Ages, Early Modern Age, grade: 1,3, University of Göttingen (Seminar für Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte), language: English, abstract: This paper will revolve around the question of how the concepts of race and culture – encompassing the entirety of human behaviour, social practices, expressive forms and technologies – or civilisation – signifying the former’s upscaled and yet more complex version – might be interlinked in the anthropological and philosophical writings of four renowned German scholars: Immanuel Kant, Johann Gottfried Herder, Christoph Meiners and Johann Friedrich Blumenbach. To this end, the intellectual preconditions for culture and civilisation need to be taken into account as well. All four of these scholars were deliberately chosen not only due to their pioneering contributions to scientific race and cultural theories, but also the controversial, at times perhaps even acrimonious debates they were engaged in with each other. Scholarly activity of the Enlightenment could be said to have carried the impulse to classify and organise the world around us and even beyond our immediate reach to extremes. However, tied to classification systems of any kind are incongruities and generalisations that do not necessarily, if at all, measure up to reality. Perhaps it is in these generalising descriptions, especially of foreign peoples and cultures, where one’s own self-conception surfaces most clearly. In order to gain insight into but a small fraction of the Enlightened mind, the analysis of some of the most influential and remarkable writings about the racial division of humankind could be a useful starting point.
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The Post-Liberal Imagination

Political Scenes from the American Cultural Landscape

Author: Bruce Baum

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137560347

Category: Political Science

Page: 257

View: 8329

In The Post-Liberal Imagination , Bruce Baum approaches American liberalism 'in a critical spirit' by examining the relationship between popular culture and politics. The book analyzes movies, television, and popular music to rethink the liberal views of democracy, equality, racism, dissent, and animal rights in the Bush-Obama era.
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Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 364110498X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 7926

Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
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Race

A Philosophical Introduction

Author: Paul C. Taylor

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745628837

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 876

Paul C. Taylor provides an accessible guide to a well-travelled but still-mysterious area of the contemporary social landscape. The result is the first philosophical introduction to the field of race theory and to a non-biological and situational notion of race. Provides the first philosophical introduction to the field of race theory. Outlines the main features and implications of race-thinking; asks questions such as: What is race-thinking? Don’t we know better than to talk about race now? Are there any races? What is it like to have a racial identity? Engages with the ideas of such important figures as Linda Alcoff, K. Anthony Appiah, W.E.B. Du Bois, Howard Winant, and Naomi Zack. Explores the enduring significance of race in relation to culture, personal relationships and social justice.
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Nova Europa

Author: Arthur Kemp

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN: 9781389875670

Category: Political Science

Page: 106

View: 1691

Laut aktuellen demografischen Trends werden die Europaer innerhalb der nachsten drei Jahrzehnte in ihren eigenen Landern zu einer Minderheit werden, die sich dann im weiteren Verlauf immer weiter reduziert, um bald danach unter einer Flut andauernder Zuwanderung und Rassenmischung vollstandig ausgeloscht zu werden. Da es mit "traditionellen" politischen Mitteln bisher nicht gelungen ist, diese Entwicklung aufzuhalten, ist nun die Zeit reif fur eine alternative Strategie zum Schutz der Europaer in einer postwestlichen Welt. Dieses Buch beschreibt eine praktische Losung: die Grundung eines Ethnostaates, losgelost von jeglichem Anspruch weier Uberlegenheit. Anhand geschichtlicher Entwicklungen und zweier praktischer Beispiele (der Afrikaaner-Stadt Orania und des zionistischen Staates Israel) entwickelt der Autor ein schlussiges Konzept, von der Bildung ortlicher europaischer Gemeinschaften bis hin zur Grundung des aus dem Chaos einer drittweltisierten Welt hervorgehenden Ethnostaates. Er schildert ausfuhrlich, welche Schritte zu ergreifen sind, und erwagt geeignete Gebiete. Das Konzept gibt eine positive, praktische Antwort auf die Krise, und seine Verwirklichung bietet den Europaern wohl ihre einzige Uberlebenschance.
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America, History and Life

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Canada

Page: N.A

View: 4269

Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.
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Europeanization in the Twentieth Century

Historical Approaches

Author: Martin Conway,Klaus Kiran Patel

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 2808

This book presents a multi-authored study of europeanisation across the twentieth century from the First World War to the present day.
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Forgotten Patriots

African American and American Indian Patriots in the Revolutionary War : a Guide to Service, Sources and Studies

Author: Eric Grundset

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 854

View: 2012

By offering a documented listing of names of African Americans and Native Americans who supported the cause of the American Revolution, we hope to inspire the interest of descendents in the efforts of their ancestors and in the work of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
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