Return of the Native (Diversion Classics)

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: Diversion Books

ISBN: 1682307689

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 8872

One of Hardy’s most popular and controversial novels, Return of the Native explores tragedy and romance with a vivacity that is his alone. Young beauty Eustacia Vye longs for the lively city of Paris and, by association, Clym Yeobright, the Egdon Heath native returning from the city’s irresistible glow. Though the two have feelings for one another, Eustacia also harbors an infatuation with her former lover, Damon Wildeve, who is to marry the innocent Thomasin Yeobright. Damon, though about to be married, is still in love with her. Eustacia, hoping it will lead to an escape from Egdon Heath, marries Clym, forever impacting the future of everyone tangled in her romantic web. An intricate and catastrophic tale of love lost, and a masterpiece by a true master of the novel. Featuring an appendix of discussion questions, this Diversion Classics edition is ideal for use in book groups and classrooms. For more classic titles like this, visit www.diversionbooks.com/ebooks/diversion-classics
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The Return of the Native

Saint George Defeated

Author: Brian Thomas

Publisher: Twayne Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 142

View: 9529

Brian Thomas begins this insightful analysis of The Return of the Native by laying to rest the contention of some earlier critics that Hardy's was an "unconscious" sort of genius; on the contrary, Thomas argues, such narratives as The Return of the Native tend to be unified by carefully established antithetical polarities of metaphor and perspective. This novel is in fact constructed around the subtle alternation of different angles of vision, according to Thomas: people and things are constantly being seen, almost cinematically, from different visual distances and are thereby revealed in new ways or with new kinds of significance. Thomas examines how myths, Christian and pagan, apply to the novel, particularly the sun-hero myth and its merging with the Christian belief in a redeemer who comes to restore life. Thomas observes that many elements of this myth appear in the novel in virtually undisplaced form, which accounts for the wasteland imagery and for the central and subtextual motifs of loss, alienation, exile, and fall. Thomas points up the irony in Hardy's use of the sun-hero myth by paralleling the legend of Saint George slaying the dragon with a "hero" who turns out to be impotent and all but blind to the salvific role accorded him. The unique power of The Return of the Native is, Thomas observes, related to its operatic quality. Although conceived in naturalistic terms, Egdon Heath has an archaic strangeness that frees the story's social world from the confines of plausibility. While often melodramatic and sometimes verging on the absurd, the novel's sense of passion and pathos is, Thomas contends, always on the grand scale. Desire and fear are characterized by a peculiar operatic compulsiveness precisely because they resonate within the context of what seems to be a compulsion of a much larger and stranger kind - a primal force that both shapes those human emotions and is oblivious to them.
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Return of the Native

Works of Hardy

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 370

View: 6049

PREFACE The date at which the following events are assumed to have occurred may be set down as between 1840 and 1850, when the old watering place herein called "Budmouth" still retained sufficient afterglow from its Georgian gaiety and prestige to lend it an absorbing attractiveness to the romantic and imaginative soul of a lonely dweller inland. Under the general name of "Egdon Heath," which has been given to the sombre scene of the story, are united or typified heaths of various real names, to the number of at least a dozen; these being virtually one in character and aspect, though their original unity, or partial unity, is now somewhat disguised by intrusive strips and slices brought under the plough with varying degrees of success, or planted to woodland. It is pleasant to dream that some spot in the extensive tract whose southwestern quarter is here described, may be the heath of that traditionary King of Wessex—Lear. July, 1895. "To sorrow I bade good morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly; She is so constant to me, and so kind. I would deceive her, And so leave her, But ah! she is so constant and so kind."
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The Return of the Native

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191500674

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 496

View: 6086

'To be loved to madness - such was her great desire' Eustacia Vye criss-crosses the wild Egdon Heath, eager to experience life to the full in her quest for 'music, poetry, passion, war'. She marries Clym Yeobright, native of the heath, but his idealism frustrates her romantic ambitions and her discontent draws others into a tangled web of deceit and unhappiness. Early readers responded to Hardy's 'insatiably observant' descriptions of the heath, a setting that for D. H. Lawrence provided the 'real stuff of tragedy'. For modern readers, the tension between the mythic setting of the heath and the modernity of the characters challenges our freedom to shape the world as we wish; like Eustacia, we may not always be able to live our dreams. This edition has a critically established text based on the manuscript and first edition. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
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The Return of the Native

Indians and Myth-Making in Spanish America, 1810–1930

Author: Rebecca A. Earle

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822388782

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 4227

Why does Argentina’s national anthem describe its citizens as sons of the Inca? Why did patriots in nineteenth-century Chile name a battleship after the Aztec emperor Montezuma? Answers to both questions lie in the tangled knot of ideas that constituted the creole imagination in nineteenth-century Spanish America. Rebecca Earle examines the place of preconquest peoples such as the Aztecs and the Incas within the sense of identity—both personal and national—expressed by Spanish American elites in the first century after independence, a time of intense focus on nation-building. Starting with the anti-Spanish wars of independence in the early nineteenth century, Earle charts the changing importance elite nationalists ascribed to the pre-Columbian past through an analysis of a wide range of sources, including historical writings, poems and novels, postage stamps, constitutions, and public sculpture. This eclectic archive illuminates the nationalist vision of creole elites throughout Spanish America, who in different ways sought to construct meaningful national myths and histories. Traces of these efforts are scattered across nineteenth-century culture; Earle maps the significance of those traces. She also underlines the similarities in the development of nineteenth-century elite nationalism across Spanish America. By offering a comparative study focused on Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Ecuador, The Return of the Native illustrates both the common features of elite nation-building and some of the significant variations. The book ends with a consideration of the pro-indigenous indigenista movements that developed in various parts of Spanish America in the early twentieth century.
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The Return of the Native

American Indian Political Resurgence

Author: Stephen Cornell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198020820

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 2670

An incisive look at American Indian and Euro-American relations from the 16th century to the present, this book focuses on how such relations have shaped the Native American political identity and tactics in the ongoing struggle for power. Cornell shows how, in the early days of colonization, Indians were able to maintain their nationhood by playing off the competing European powers; and how the American Revolution and westward expansion eventually caused Native Americans to lose their land, social cohesion, and economic independence. The final part of the book recounts the slow, steady reemergence of American Indian political power and identity, evidenced by militant political activism in the 1960s and early 1970s. By paying particular attention to the evolution of Indian groups as collective actors and to changes over time in Indian political opportunities and their capacities to act on those opportunities, Cornell traces the Indian path from power to powerlessness and back to power again.
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Thomas Hardy's The return of the native

Author: Harold Bloom

Publisher: Chelsea House Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 152

View: 7856

A collection of eight critical essays on Hardy's novel "The Return of the Native" arranged in chronological order of publication.
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THE RETURN OF THE NATIVE

Author: N.A

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1613103174

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8635

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The return of a native reporter

Author: Robert Chesshyre

Publisher: Viking Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5588

A British journalist reports on his rediscovery of his native country after four years in the United States, exploring the changed attitudes of British society and the faded sense of national unity
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The Return of the Native, by Thomas Hardy's Sixth Published Novel

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781534870314

Category:

Page: 230

View: 8631

The Return of the Native is Thomas Hardy's sixth published novel. It first appeared in the magazine Belgravia, a publication known for its sensationalism, and was presented in twelve monthly installments from January to December 1878. Because of the novel's controversial themes, Hardy had some difficulty finding a publisher; reviews, however, though somewhat mixed, were generally positive. In the twentieth century, The Return of the Native became one of Hardy's most popular novels.The novel takes place entirely in the environs of Egdon Heath, and, with the exception of the epilogue, Aftercourses, covers exactly a year and a day. The narrative begins on the evening of Guy Fawkes Night as Diggory Venn is slowly crossing the heath with his van, which is being drawn by ponies. In his van is a passenger. When darkness falls, the country folk light bonfires on the surrounding hills, emphasising-not for the last time-the pagan spirit of the heath and its denizens.Venn is a reddleman; he travels the country supplying farmers with a red mineral called "reddle," a dialect term for red ochre, that farmers use to mark their sheep. Although his trade has stained him red from head to foot, underneath his devilish colouring he is a handsome, shrewd, well-meaning young man. His passenger is a young woman named Thomasin Yeobright, whom Venn is taking home. Earlier that day, Thomasin had planned to marry Damon Wildeve, a local innkeeper known for his fickleness; however, an inconsistency in the marriage licence delayed the marriage. Thomasin, in distress, ran after the reddleman's van and asked him to take her home. Venn himself is in love with Thomasin, and unsuccessfully wooed her a year or two before. Now, although he believes Wildeve is unworthy of her love, he is so devoted to her that he is willing to help her secure the man of her choice. At length, Venn reaches Bloom's End, the home of Thomasin's aunt, Mrs. Yeobright. She is a good woman, if somewhat proud and inflexible, and she wants the best for Thomasin. In former months she opposed her niece's choice of husband, and publicly forbade the banns; now, since Thomasin has compromised herself by leaving town with Wildeve and returning unmarried, the best outcome Mrs. Yeobright can envision is for the postponed marriage to be duly solemnised as soon as possible. She and Venn both begin working on Wildeve to make sure he keeps his promise to Thomasin. Wildeve, however, is still preoccupied with Eustacia Vye, an exotically beautiful young woman living with her grandfather in a lonely house on Egdon Heath. Eustacia is a black-haired, queenly woman, whose Italian father came from Corfu, and who grew up in Budmouth, a fashionable seaside resort. She holds herself aloof from most of the heathfolk; they, in turn, consider her an oddity, and some even think she's a witch. She is nothing like Thomasin, who is sweet-natured. She loathes the heath, yet roams it constantly, carrying a spyglass and an hourglass. The previous year, she and Wildeve were lovers; however, even during the height of her passion for him, she knew she only loved him because there was no better object available. When Wildeve broke off the relationship to court Thomasin, Eustacia's interest in him briefly returned. The two meet on Guy Fawkes night, and Wildeve asks her to run off to America with him. She demurs.Eustacia drops Wildeve when Mrs. Yeobright's son Clym, a successful diamond merchant, returns from Paris to his native Egdon Heath. Although he has no plans to return to Paris or the diamond trade and is, in fact, planning to become a schoolmaster for the rural poor, Eustacia sees him as a way to escape the hated heath and begin a grander, richer existence in a glamorous new location. With some difficulty, she arranges to meet Clym, and the two soon fall in love. When Mrs. Yeobright objects, Clym quarrels with her; later, she quarrels with Eustacia as well........
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Private Life

A Novel

Author: Jane Smiley

Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated

ISBN: 9781400040605

Category: Fiction

Page: 317

View: 6407

As her husband's obsessions with science take a darker turn on the eve of World War II, Margaret Mayfield is forced to consider the life she has so carefully constructed. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Thousand Acres.
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Challenging Euro-America's Politics of Identity

The Return of the Native

Author: Jorge Luis Andrade Fernandes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135977003

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 4648

In this fascinating book, Jorge Luis Andrade Fernandes critically examines the impact of colonialism and postcolonial migration on the politics and identity of Euro-American imperial powers. It considers how ‘outsiders’ are part of the construction of the ‘native’ identity of the nation-state, and also how they challenge its essential coherence when they ‘return’ to the centre in our increasingly globalized world. Engaging in a theoretically-motivated discussion of a range of sources (film, fiction, political theory and state policy); the volume traces the nomadic movement of bodies across national frontiers, helping us to question any natural link between nation-states and identities, and between places and peoples. This is not merely a theoretical problem, as Fernandes relates it to the very current crisis of nativistic / multicultural identity in the West. He examines how politics takes shape in transnational social and cultural encounters, and how this new politics is not just about containing aliens, but also contains fruitful possibilities for different modes of being. Challenging Euro-America's Politics of Identity will be of interest to advanced students and scholars in politics, geography, postcolonial studies, cultural studies, African and African-American studies, comparative literature, American studies, and Ethnic studies.
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The Original 1939 Notebook of a Return to the Native Land

Bilingual Edition

Author: Aimé Césaire

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 081957371X

Category: Poetry

Page: 120

View: 1982

Aimé Césaire’s masterpiece, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land, is a work of immense cultural significance and beauty. This long poem was the beginning of Césaire’s quest for négritude, and it became an anthem of Blacks around the world. Commentary on Césaire’s work has often focused on its Cold War and anticolonialist rhetoric—material that Césaire only added in 1956. The original 1939 version of the poem, given here in French, and in its first English translation, reveals a work that is both spiritual and cultural in structure, tone, and thrust. This Wesleyan edition includes the original illustrations by Wifredo Lam, and an introduction, notes, and chronology by A. James Arnold.
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The Return of the Native (1878) Novel by

Thomas Hardy ( Hardy's Most Popular Novels )

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781542740678

Category:

Page: 252

View: 9838

The Return of the Native is Thomas Hardy's sixth published novel. It first appeared in the serial Belgravia, a publication known for its sensationalism, and was presented in twelve monthly instalments from January to December of 1878. Due to the novel's controversial themes, Hardy had some difficulty finding a publisher; reviews, however, though somewhat mixed, were generally positive. In the twentieth century, Return of the Native became one of Hardy's most popular novels
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The Stationary Ark

Author: Gerald Durrell

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504042840

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 157

View: 5303

A famed zookeeper reflects on his lifelong love of animals—and his decision to build them a home—in this memoir by the author of the Corfu Trilogy. The first word Gerald Durrell could say with any clarity was “zoo.” Animals were his passion. His early years in India were full of routine visits to the local zoo, and if his nursemaid attempted to deviate from this routine, the result was usually a tantrum. Years later, when Durrell decided to set up the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust—which would later become the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust—he didn’t want it to be like other zoos. He didn’t want a place where animals were simply imprisoned, where parents reluctantly brought their children to get sick on ice cream. More than a place for entertainment, Durrell’s zoo needed to be a place for education, research, and conservation. But achieving his goal would force him to question if wild animals really did belong in the care of humans. The Stationary Ark is an entertaining and thoughtful look at a career in zookeeping from the man who inspired acclaimed Masterpiece production The Durrells in Corfu, which aired on public television. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Gerald Durrell including rare photos from the author’s estate.
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The Return of the Native

Author: Suky Best,Steven Bode

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781904270201

Category: Nature photography

Page: 64

View: 4736

"'The Return of the Native' was released to accompany the exhibition of the same name at Pump House Gallery, London, in 2005. This small-format publication, resembling the old fashioned Ladybird book of birds, chronicles this particular body of work by British artist, Suky Best. Highlighting the gradual disappearance of hitherto common types of wildlife from their former habitats across the UK, Best's work 'The Return of the Native' presents a series of vivid and disarming photographs and short video animations, through which she digitally reintroduces a number of birds and insects into landscapes where they were previously seen in significant numbers but where they are now virtually extinct. The slightly studied and stylised nature of each composition, in which the respective elements don't quite fit together, elicits a vague but deceptively disquieting sense of loss. This book features an introductory essay by one of Britain's best-known writers on birds and birdwatching, Stephen Moss author of Garden Birds (Collins) and Bird in the Bush: A Social History of Birdwatching (Arum Press). A further essay, by the artist and writer Nicky Coutts, considers the themes and motifs of these new works in the context of Best's broader artistic practice." [Publisher's statement].
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