The Reagan Reversal

Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War

Author: Beth A. Fischer

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826273122

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 8674

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the cold war, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard- line approach toward Moscow. In The Reagan Reversal, now available in paperback, Beth A. Fischer convincingly demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev took office. She shows that Reagan, known for his long-standing antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation, and understanding" between the superpowers. This well-written and concise study challenges the conventional wisdom about the president himself and reveals that Reagan was, at times, the driving force behind United States-Soviet policy.
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The Reagan Reversal

Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War

Author: Beth A. Fischer

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826212875

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 8157

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the cold war, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard-line approach toward Moscow. In The Reagan Reversal, Beth A. Fischer convincingly demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev took office. She shows that Reagan, known for his longstanding antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation, and understanding" between the superpowers. What caused such a reversal in policy? Fischer considers three explanations for the reversal. First, she considers the possibility that the administration reversed course simply to cater to public opinion during an election year. Second, she investigates whether new personnel, namely Secretary of State George Shultz and National Security Adviser Robert McFarlane, took control of U.S. policy and made changes more in line with their personal views. Third, Fischer considers the possibility that Reagan himself redirected U.S. policy out of his fear of nuclear war. This is the explanation Fischer defends as most significant.
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The Reagan Reversal

Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War

Author: Beth A. Fischer

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826212870

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 2316

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the cold war, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard-line approach toward Moscow. In The Reagan Reversal, Beth A. Fischer convincingly demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev took office. She shows that Reagan, known for his longstanding antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation, and understanding" between the superpowers. What caused such a reversal in policy? Fischer considers three explanations for the reversal. First, she considers the possibility that the administration reversed course simply to cater to public opinion during an election year. Second, she investigates whether new personnel, namely Secretary of State George Shultz and National Security Adviser Robert McFarlane, took control of U.S. policy and made changes more in line with their personal views. Third, Fischer considers the possibility that Reagan himself redirected U.S. policy out of his fear of nuclear war. This is the explanation Fischer defends as most significant.
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The Rebellion of Ronald Reagan

A History of the End of the Cold War

Author: Jim Mann

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780670020546

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 3831

The author of Rise of the Vulcans presents a controversial analysis of the fortieth president's role in ending the cold war, in a provocative report that challenges popular beliefs, reveals lesser-known aspects of the Reagan administration's foreign policy, and cites the contributions of such figures as Nixon, Kissinger, and Gorbachev.
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Planning Reagan's War

Conservative Strategists and America's Cold War Victory

Author: Francis H. Marlo

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 159797742X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 243

View: 1151

Ronald Reagan as a man of ideas.
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Reagan And Gorbachev

How The Cold War Ended

Author: Jack F. Matlock, Jr.

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812974891

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 6135

A former diplomat and scholar of Russian history and culture offers an insider's look at the end of the Cold War, the relationship between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, and the complicated diplomatic campaign aimed at changing history. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.
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The Last Superpower Summits

Gorbachev, Reagan and Bush. Conversations that Ended the Cold War

Author: Thomas Blanton,Svetlana Savranskaya

Publisher: Central European University Press

ISBN: 9633861713

Category: History

Page: 1070

View: 9892

This book publishes for the first time in print every word the American and Soviet leaders – Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, and George H.W. Bush – said to each other in their superpower summits from 1985 to 1991. Obtained by the authors through the Freedom of Information Act in the U.S., from the Gorbachev Foundation and the State Archive of the Russian Federation in Moscow, and from the personal donation of Anatoly Chernyaev, these previously Top Secret verbatim transcripts combine with key declassified preparatory and after-action documents from both sides to create a unique interactive documentary record of these historic highest-level talks – the conversations that ended the Cold War.
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Cold War's Last Battlefield, The

Reagan, the Soviets, and Central America

Author: Edward A. Lynch

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438439504

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 3030

An engaging insider's account by a member of President Reagan's Central America policy team.
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Making the Unipolar Moment

U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order

Author: Hal Brands

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501703420

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2939

In the late 1970s, the United States often seemed to be a superpower in decline. Battered by crises and setbacks around the globe, its post–World War II international leadership appeared to be draining steadily away. Yet just over a decade later, by the early 1990s, America's global primacy had been reasserted in dramatic fashion. The Cold War had ended with Washington and its allies triumphant; democracy and free markets were spreading like never before. The United States was now enjoying its "unipolar moment"—an era in which Washington faced no near-term rivals for global power and influence, and one in which the defining feature of international politics was American dominance. How did this remarkable turnaround occur, and what role did U.S. foreign policy play in causing it? In this important book, Hal Brands uses recently declassified archival materials to tell the story of American resurgence. Brands weaves together the key threads of global change and U.S. policy from the late 1970s through the early 1990s, examining the Cold War struggle with Moscow, the rise of a more integrated and globalized world economy, the rapid advance of human rights and democracy, and the emergence of new global challenges like Islamic extremism and international terrorism. Brands reveals how deep structural changes in the international system interacted with strategies pursued by Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush to usher in an era of reinvigorated and in many ways unprecedented American primacy. Making the Unipolar Moment provides an indispensable account of how the post–Cold War order that we still inhabit came to be.
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Nixon's Back Channel to Moscow

Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

Author: Richard A. Moss

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813167892

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 1256

Most Americans consider détente -- the reduction of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union -- to be among the Nixon administration's most significant foreign policy successes. The diplomatic back channel that national security advisor Henry Kissinger established with Soviet ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin became the most important method of achieving this thaw in the Cold War. Kissinger praised back channels for preventing leaks, streamlining communications, and circumventing what he perceived to be the US State Department's unresponsive and self-interested bureaucracy. Nixon and Kissinger's methods, however, were widely criticized by State Department officials left out of the loop and by an American press and public weary of executive branch prevarication and secrecy. Richard A. Moss's penetrating study documents and analyzes US-Soviet back channels from Nixon's inauguration through what has widely been heralded as the apex of détente, the May 1972 Moscow Summit. He traces the evolution of confidential-channel diplomacy and examines major flashpoints, including the 1970 crisis over Cienfuegos, Cuba, the Strategic Arms Limitations Talks (SALT), US dealings with China, deescalating tensions in Berlin, and the Vietnam War. Moss argues that while the back channels improved US-Soviet relations in the short term, the Nixon-Kissinger methods provided a poor foundation for lasting policy. Employing newly declassified documents, the complete record of the Kissinger-Dobrynin channel -- jointly compiled, translated, annotated, and published by the US State Department and the Russian Foreign Ministry -- as well as the Nixon tapes, Moss reveals the behind-the-scenes deliberations of Nixon, his advisers, and their Soviet counterparts. Although much has been written about détente, this is the first scholarly study that comprehensively assesses the central role of confidential diplomacy in shaping America's foreign policy during this critical era.
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Reagan at Reykjavik

Forty-Eight Hours That Ended the Cold War

Author: Ken Adelman

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062310216

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3564

The dramatic, first-hand account of the historic 1986 Reagan-Gorbachev summit in Iceland—the definitive weekend that was the key turning point in the Cold War—by President Reagan’s arms control director, Ken Adelman. In October 1986, Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev met for a forty-eight-hour summit in Reykjavik, Iceland. Planned as a short, inconsequential gathering to outline future talks, the meeting quickly turned to major international issues, including the strategic defense initiative and the possibility of eliminating all nuclear weapons—negotiations that laid the groundwork for the most sweeping arms accord in history the following year. Scrupulously researched and based on now-declassified information, Reagan at Reykjavik tells the gripping tale of this weekend that changed the world. Filled with illustrative accounts of the private discussions between Reagan and his team, Ken Adelman provides an honest and up-close portrait of President Reagan at one of his finest and most challenging moments. Reagan at Reykjavik includes 16 pages of black-and-white photos and 11 illustrations.
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The Triumph of Improvisation

Gorbachev's Adaptability, Reagan's Engagement, and the End of the Cold War

Author: James Wilson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801470226

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 3073

In The Triumph of Improvisation, James Graham Wilson takes a long view of the end of the Cold War, from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979 to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. Drawing on deep archival research and recently declassified papers, Wilson argues that adaptation, improvisation, and engagement by individuals in positions of power ended the specter of a nuclear holocaust. Amid ambivalence and uncertainty, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, George Shultz, George H. W. Bush, and a host of other actors engaged with adversaries and adapted to a rapidly changing international environment and information age in which global capitalism recovered as command economies failed. Eschewing the notion of a coherent grand strategy to end the Cold War, Wilson paints a vivid portrait of how leaders made choices; some made poor choices while others reacted prudently, imaginatively, and courageously to events they did not foresee. A book about the burdens of responsibility, the obstacles of domestic politics, and the human qualities of leadership, The Triumph of Improvisation concludes with a chapter describing how George H. W. Bush oversaw the construction of a new configuration of power after the fall of the Berlin Wall, one that resolved the fundamental components of the Cold War on Washington's terms.
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Reagan

American Icon

Author: Iwan Morgan

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1786720507

Category: Political Science

Page: 408

View: 2014

The Reagan era is usually seen as an era of unheralded prosperity, and as a high-watermark of Republican success. President Ronald Reagan’s belief in “Reaganomics”,his media-friendly sound-bites and “can do”personality have come to define the era.However, this was also a time of domestic protest and unrest. Under Reagan the USwas directly involved in the revolutions which were sweeping the Central Americas– El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala –and in Nicaragua Reagan armed the Contras who fought the Sandinistas. This book seeks to show how the left withinthe US reacted and protested against these events. The Nation, Verso Books and the Guardian exploded in popularity, riding high on the back of popular anti-interventionist sentiment in America, whilethe film-maker Oliver Stone led a group ofdirectors making films with a radical left-wing message. The author shows how the1980s in America were a formative cultural period for the anti-Reaganites as well as the Reaganites, and in doing so charts a new history.
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The United States and Fascist Italy, 1922-1940

Author: David F. Schmitz

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469639874

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 780

A comprehensive analysis of American foreign policy and Mussolini's Italy. Schmitz argues that the U.S. desire for order, interest in Open Door trade, and concern about left-wing revolution led American policymakers to welcome Mussolini's coming to power and to support fascism in Italy for most of the interwar period. Originally published in 1988. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.
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Rise of the Revisionists

Russia, China, and Iran

Author: Gary J. Schmitt

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0844750158

Category: Political Science

Page: 122

View: 7623

Rise of the Revisionists: Russia, China, and Iran examines the ambitions of the three rising powers in essays by Frederick Kagan, Dan Blumenthal, and Reuel Marc Gerecht. An introduction by volume editor Gary Schmitt and a concluding essay by Walter Russell Mead place the challenges facing the US in a broader strategic and historical framework.
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The Last Colonial Massacre

Latin America in the Cold War, Updated Edition

Author: Greg Grandin,Naomi Klein

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226306909

Category: History

Page: 319

View: 6473

After decades of bloodshed and political terror, many lament the rise of the left in Latin America. Since the triumph of Castro, politicians and historians have accused the left there of rejecting democracy, embracing communist totalitarianism, and prompting both revolutionary violence and a right-wing backlash. Through unprecedented archival research and gripping personal testimonies, Greg Grandin powerfully challenges these views in this classic work. In doing so, he uncovers the hidden history of the Latin American Cold War: of hidebound reactionaries holding on to their power and privilege; of Mayan Marxists blending indigenous notions of justice with universal ideas of equality; and of a United States supporting new styles of state terror throughout the region. With Guatemala as his case study, Grandin argues that the Latin American Cold War was a struggle not between political liberalism and Soviet communism but two visions of democracy—one vibrant and egalitarian, the other tepid and unequal—and that the conflict’s main effect was to eliminate homegrown notions of social democracy. Updated with a new preface by the author and an interview with Naomi Klein, The Last Colonial Massacre is history of the highest order—a work that will dramatically recast our understanding of Latin American politics and the role of the United States in the Cold War and beyond. “This work admirably explains the process in which hopes of democracy were brutally repressed in Guatemala and its people experienced a civil war lasting for half a century.”—International History Review “A richly detailed, humane, and passionately subversive portrait of inspiring reformers tragically redefined by the Cold War as enemies of the state.”—Journal of American History
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Roosevelt's Lost Alliances

How Personal Politics Helped Start the Cold War

Author: Frank Costigliola

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691157928

Category: History

Page: 533

View: 2118

Shows how Franklin D. Roosevelt alienated his inner circle of advisors as he built an alliance between him, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin, an alliance that eroded when Harry Truman took the presidency after Roosevelt's death, eventually leading to the Cold War.
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War in a Time of Peace

Bush, Clinton, and the Generals

Author: David Halberstam

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501141503

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 2311

Pulitzer Prize­-winning journalist David Halberstam chronicles Washington politics and foreign policy in post­ Cold War America. Evoking the internal conflicts, unchecked egos, and power struggles within the White House, the State Department, and the military, Halberstam shows how the decisions of men who served in the Vietnam War, and those who did not, have shaped America's role in global events. He provides fascinating portraits of those in power—Clinton, Bush, Reagan, Kissinger, James Baker, Dick Cheney, Madeleine Albright, and others—to reveal a stunning view of modern political America.
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Presidential Faith and Foreign Policy

Jimmy Carter the Disciple and Ronald Reagan the Alchemist

Author: W. Steding

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137477113

Category: Political Science

Page: 289

View: 9347

This book explores the relationship between the religious beliefs of presidents and their foreign policymaking. Through the application of a new methodological approach that provides a cognetic narrative of each president, this study reveals the significance of religion's impact on U.S. foreign policy.
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Summits

Author: David Reynolds

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458752291

Category: Diplomacy

Page: 884

View: 5230

Recounts six summits which had a significant political impact during the twentieth century, including the Yalta summit in 1945 with Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin, and the Geneva summit in 1985 with Gorbachev and Reagan.
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