Masters of Illusion in the Garden of Time

Author: Forrest Somma

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1477109218

Category: Fiction

Page: 215

View: 8028

Sundown, a freewheeling artist of note enters into a state of dispare he cannot shake. He seeks alternative answers from a Dr.Shinto. under hypogensis Sundown enters the land of the path. Four warrior, priests of the order of the dwellers of the threshold descend into matter in that realm, carrying the great artifact the yeshe. Vows are broken and the barer of the yeshe hides with it as it consumes him in dialbo cave. Sundown is captured by one of these beings and in time escapes. Continuing on the path he meets his mentor Toshin. He is trained and excels in ancient survival and defensive techniques. Under Toshins guidance they assault dialbo cave an a attempt to retrieve the yeshe and place it where it can do no more harm. So the saga begins. In time Sundown returns to the present day reality. Slowly the world slips into cataclysm. Sundown and company enter 2400 B.C. In an attempt, in the past to alter the present and avoid the coming mass destruction that is upon most of the world. Yet, none of them are safe from danger from within or without.
Release

Changing The Subject

Mary Wroth and Figurations of Gender in Early Modern England

Author: Naomi Miller

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813158842

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9794

Lady Mary Wroth (c. 1587-1653) wrote the first sonnet sequence in English by a woman, one of the first plays by a woman, and the first published work of fiction by an Englishwoman. Yet, despite her status as a member of the distinguished Sidney family, Wroth met with disgrace at court for her authorship of a prose romance, which was adjudged an inappropriate endeavor for a woman and was forcibly withdrawn from publication. Only recently has recognition of Wroth's historical and literary importance been signaled by the publication of the first modern edition of her romance, The Countess of Mountgomeries Urania. Naomi Miller offers an illuminating study of this significant early modern woman writer. Using multiple critical/theoretical perspectives, including French feminism, new historicism, and cultural materialism, she examines gender in Wroth's time. Moving beyond the emphasis on victimization that shaped many previous studies, she considers the range of strategies devised by women writers of the period to establish voices for themselves. Where previous critics have viewed Wroth primarily in relation to her male literary predecessors in the Sidney family, Miller explores Wroth's engagement with a variety of discourses, reading her in relation to a broad range of English and continental authors, both male and female, from Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare to Aemilia Lanier, Elizabeth Cary, and Marguerite de Navarre. She also contextualizes Wroth's writing in relation to a variety of nonliterary texts of the period, both political and domestic. Thanks to Miller's sensitive readings, Wroth's writings provide a lens through which to view gender relations in the early modern period.
Release

The Queen's Mercy

Gender and Judgment in Representations of Elizabeth I

Author: M. Villeponteaux

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137371757

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 1796

During the Elizabethan era, writers such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Sidney, Daniel, and others frequently expounded on mercy, exploring the sources and outcomes of clemency. This fresh reading of such depictions shows that the concept of mercy was a contested one, directly shaped by tensions over the exercise of judgment by a woman on the throne.
Release

Mary I

Gender, Power, and Ceremony in the Reign of England’s First Queen

Author: S. Duncan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137047909

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1972

This book explores the gender politics of the reign of Mary I of England from her coronation to her funeral and examines the ways in which the queen and her supporters used language, royal ceremonies, and images to bolster her right to rule and define her image as queen.
Release

Beauty Queens on the Global Stage

Gender, Contests, and Power

Author: Colleen Ballerion Cohen,Richard Wilk,Beverly Stoeltje

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136658262

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 8207

Modern beauty contests were invented by P.T. Barnum in the United States, but in the 20th century pageants and contests have spread across the entire world from Nepal to Tierra Del Fuego. Why are women (and sometimes men in drag) parading on stage such a universally appealing spectacle, attracting an audience in the billions? This book is the first global comparison of pageants from different parts of the world, at the ways each contest is both intensely local and unique, and simultaneously global and remarkable repetitious. The authors use the latest tools of feminist, ethnographic, and literary scholarship to unpack and interpret one of the greatest and most universal spectacles of modern times.
Release

Ceremonial Entries in Early Modern Europe

The Iconography of Power

Author: J.R. Mulryne,Maria Ines Aliverti,Anna Maria Testaverde

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472432053

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 1589

The fourteen essays that comprise this volume concentrate on festival iconography, the visual and written languages, including ephemeral and permanent structures, costume, dramatic performance, inscriptions and published festival books that ‘voiced’ the social, political and cultural messages incorporated in processional entries in the countries of early modern Europe. The volume also includes a transcript of the newly-discovered Register of Lionardo di Zanobi Bartholini, a Florentine merchant, which sets out in detail the expenses for each worker for the possesso (or Entry) of Pope Leo X to Rome in April 1513.
Release

Early Modern Women's Writing and the Rhetoric of Modesty

Author: P. Pender

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137008016

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 7895

An in-depth study of early modern women's modesty rhetoric from the English Reformation to the Restoration. This book provides new readings of modesty's gendered deployment in the works of Anne Askew, Katharine Parr, Mary Sidney, Aemilia Lanyer and Anne Bradstreet.
Release

Mobilizing New York

AIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism

Author: Tamar W. Carroll

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146961989X

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 3348

Examining three interconnected case studies, Tamar Carroll powerfully demonstrates the ability of grassroots community activism to bridge racial and cultural differences and effect social change. Drawing on a rich array of oral histories, archival records, newspapers, films, and photographs from post–World War II New York City, Carroll shows how poor people transformed the antipoverty organization Mobilization for Youth and shaped the subsequent War on Poverty. Highlighting the little-known National Congress of Neighborhood Women, she reveals the significant participation of working-class white ethnic women and women of color in New York City's feminist activism. Finally, Carroll traces the partnership between the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) and Women's Health Action Mobilization (WHAM!), showing how gay men and feminists collaborated to create a supportive community for those affected by the AIDS epidemic, to improve health care, and to oppose homophobia and misogyny during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. Carroll contends that social policies that encourage the political mobilization of marginalized groups and foster coalitions across identity differences are the most effective means of solving social problems and realizing democracy.
Release

The Year of Three Kings, 1483

Author: Giles St Aubyn

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571299342

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 5996

Richard III has the most controversial reputation of any English king. If he was the murderer of his two nephews and (as many contemporaries thought) the poisoner of his own wife, he has a place among the foremost villains of history. If however his only real crime was to have been on the losing side, then he is the victim of an extraordinary and enduring smear campaign. Which version is correct? Whether true or false, the legend of Richard III's villainy has embedded itself in the nation's consciousness. In this clear, careful narrative, first published in 1983 (the 500th anniversary of a year in which three kings occupied the throne of England) Giles St. Aubyn relates the violent and blood-stained story, his cool, witty style contrasting with the brutality of the period he describes.
Release

Lives of the Queens of England

From the Norman Conquest

Author: Agnes Strickland,Elisabeth Strickland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Queens

Page: N.A

View: 7044

Release

Three Medieval Queens

Queenship and the Crown in Fourteenth-Century England

Author: Lisa Benz St. John

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113709432X

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 3204

This book is an innovative study offering the first examination of how three fourteenth-century English queens, Margaret of France, Isabella of France, and Philippa of Hainault, exercised power and authority. It frames its analysis around four major themes: gender; status; the concept of the crown; and power and authority.
Release

Shakespeare and Appropriation

Author: Christy Desmet,Robert Sawyer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134622619

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 3712

The vitality of our culture is still often measured by the status Shakespeare has within it. Contemporary readers and writers continue to exploit Shakespeare's cultural afterlife in a vivid and creative way. This fascinating collection of original essays shows how writers' efforts to imitate, contradict, compete with, and reproduce Shakespeare keep him in the cultural conversation. The essays: * analyze the methods and motives of Shakespearean appropriation * investigate theoretically the return of the repressed author in discussions of Shakespeare's cultural function * put into dialogue theoretical and literary responses to Shakespeare's cultural authority * analyze works ranging from nineteenth century to the present, and genres ranging from poetry and the novel to Disney movies.
Release

Spirits of the Rockies

Reasserting an Indigenous Presence in Banff National Park

Author: Courtney W. Mason

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442619929

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2013

The Banff–Bow Valley in western Alberta is the heart of spiritual and economic life for the Nakoda peoples. While they were displaced from the region by the reserve system and the creation of Canada’s first national park, in the twentieth century the Nakoda reasserted their presence in the valley through involvement in regional tourism economies and the Banff Indian Days sporting festivals. Drawing on extensive oral testimony from the Nakoda, supplemented by detailed analysis of archival and visual records, Spirits of the Rockies is a sophisticated account of the situation that these Indigenous communities encountered when they were denied access to the Banff National Park. Courtney W. Mason examines the power relations and racial discourses that dominated the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and shows how the Nakoda strategically used the Banff Indian Days festivals to gain access to sacred lands and respond to colonial policies designed to repress their cultures.
Release

Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation

The Question of Creativity in the Shadow of Production

Author: Dalibor Vesely

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262220675

Category: Architecture

Page: 506

View: 4672

Reclaiming the humanistic role of architecture in the age of technology: an examination of architecture's indispensable role as a cultural force throughout history.
Release

De Witt Clinton and the Rise of the People's Men

Author: Craig Hanyan,Mary L. Hanyan

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773514348

Category: History

Page: 419

View: 5827

In 1824 the People's party, the first popular reform movement in the American republic, elected most of its candidates for the Senate and Assembly of New York, the new nation's most populous state. Craig Hanyan and Mary Hanyan examine the development of this influential movement and the role of De Witt Clinton, its chief beneficiary.
Release

“The” Athenaeum

Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music and the Drama

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 517

Release

Separated by Their Sex

Women in Public and Private in the Colonial Atlantic World

Author: Mary Beth Norton

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801461378

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6713

In Separated by Their Sex, Mary Beth Norton offers a bold genealogy that shows how gender came to determine the right of access to the Anglo-American public sphere by the middle of the eighteenth century. Earlier, high-status men and women alike had been recognized as appropriate political actors, as exemplified during and after Bacon's Rebellion by the actions of-and reactions to-Lady Frances Berkeley, wife of Virginia's governor. By contrast, when the first ordinary English women to claim a political voice directed group petitions to Parliament during the Civil War of the 1640s, men relentlessly criticized and parodied their efforts. Even so, as late as 1690 Anglo-American women's political interests and opinions were publicly acknowledged. Norton traces the profound shift in attitudes toward women's participation in public affairs to the age's cultural arbiters, including John Dunton, editor of the Athenian Mercury, a popular 1690s periodical that promoted women's links to husband, family, and household. Fittingly, Dunton was the first author known to apply the word "private" to women and their domestic lives. Subsequently, the immensely influential authors Richard Steele and Joseph Addison (in the Tatler and the Spectator) advanced the notion that women's participation in politics-even in political dialogues-was absurd. They and many imitators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that women should confine themselves to home and family, a position that American women themselves had adopted by the 1760s. Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives. On the cusp of the American Revolution, Norton concludes, a newly gendered public-private division was firmly in place.
Release