The Politics of New Immigrant Destinations

Transatlantic Perspectives

Author: Stefanie Chambers,Diana Evans,Abigail Williamson,Anthony Messina

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 143991463X

Category: Political Science

Page: 348

View: 8972

Migration to new destinations in Europe and the United States has expanded dramatically over the past few decades. Within these destinations, there is a corresponding greater variety of ethnic, cultural, and/or religious diversity. This timely volume, The Politics of New Immigrant Destinations, considers the challenges posed by this proliferation of diversity for governments, majority populations, and immigrants. The contributors assess the effectiveness of the policy and political responses that have been spawned by increasing diversity in four types of new immigrant destinations: intermediate destination countries Ireland and Italy; culturally distinct regions experiencing new migration such as Catalonia in Spain or the American South; new destinations within traditional destination countries like the state of Utah and rural towns in England; and early migration cycle countries including Latvia and Poland. The Politics of New Immigrant Destinations examines how these new destinations for immigrants compare to traditional destinations, with respect to their policy responses and success at integrating immigrants, offering perspectives from both immigrants and natives. Contributors include: Dace Akule, AmadoAlarcon, Rhys Andrews, Francesca Campomori, Tiziana Caponio, Scott Decker, Erica Dobbs, Melissa M. Goldsmith, Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska, Claudio A. Holzner, Magdalena Lesinska, Paul Lewis, Helen B. Marrow, Laura Morales, Katia Pilati, Marie Provine, Monica Varsanyi, and the editors. "
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Separate Destinations

Migration, Immigration, and the Politics of Places

Author: James G. Gimpel

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472109784

Category: Political Science

Page: 403

View: 4343

Shows the effect on elections of the different settlement patterns of immigrants and native migrants in the United States
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The Oxford Handbook of the Politics of International Migration

Author: Marc R. Rosenblum,Daniel J. Tichenor

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195337220

Category: Political Science

Page: 660

View: 5902

Twenty-nine specialists offer their perspectives on migration from a wide variety of fields: political science, sociology, economics, and anthropology.
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The Politics of Immigration. Is Germany Moving Towards a Multicultural Society?

Author: Samuel Skipper

Publisher: Anchor Academic Publishing

ISBN: 3960671024

Category: Social Science

Page: 52

View: 6406

The topic of immigration is never simple. Questions such as ‘who belongs to society?’ and ‘how do you define national identity?’, or ‘what values are needed to maintain a coexisting society?’ are extremely difficult to answer. Global migration introduces unprecedented challenges for conceptualising the integration of immigrants. On a European scale, Germany can be said to represent the first destination for immigrants since its unification in 1989. On a global level, Germany is the second largest immigrant receiving country after the United States. Nevertheless, only recently has Germany recognised and admitted that it is an ethnically and culturally diverse society. Before the 1998 elections, successive governments have always stuck to the maxim that Germany is ‘not a country of immigration’. The infamous phrase came under increased pressure with the electoral victory of the Red-Green coalition in 1998. New laws regarding immigration, integration and citizenship were on the agenda with the aim of replacing the traditional ethnocultural model of German nationhood with a more liberal and modern model by moving away from the concepts of Volk and ius sanguinis. The conservative CDU, however, accused the Schroder government of trying to jeopardize German cultural identity, causing a fierce debate known as the Leitkultur (Guiding culture) debate. On the one side of this debate there were the conservative CDU politicians who viewed Germany in ethno-nationalist terms, while on the other members of the Green Party and the SPD, who attempted substituting the ‘volkish’ tradition with a multicultural model of citizenship that guaranteed universal human rights. The aim of this study is to assess which of these two models are currently prevailing in moulding immigration and integration policy. Has the progressive left achieved its objective of moving away from the traditional ethnocultural and assimilationalist model defining citizenship towards a more inclusive multicultural model?
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New Immigration Destinations

Migrating to Rural and Peripheral Areas

Author: Ruth McAreavey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351661213

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 5164

Current population movements involve both established and new destinations, often encompassing marginal and rural communities and resulting in a whole new set of issues for these communities. New Immigration Destinations examines structural forces and individual strategies and behaviour to highlight the opportunities and challenges for ‘new’ destination areas arising from new economic and cultural mobility. Representing a "second wave" in studies of in-migration, this volume examines patterns in "non-traditional" rural and peripheral migration destinations, with a particular case study on Northern Ireland. Indeed, focusing mainly on events in the host society, this book shows how processes of migrant incorporation are complex and rely on multifarious influences including the state, community, individuals and families. Accordingly, the book develops of migration and social integration within rural/peripheral destinations. This subsequently provides clarification of many of the contested concepts including transnationalism; integration, acculturation and assimilation; ‘new’ destinations; and migrants and ethnic minorities. Focusing on the local and the micro with a strong sense of research, social and policy reality, this timely volume critically engages with original theories of migration, thus providing a much fuller conceptual and theoretical understanding that is required in the emerging field of migration studies within a rapidly changing and uncertain world. This book’s interdisciplinary nature will appeal to policymakers, scholars, and both undergraduate and postgraduate students in a range of disciplines including Sociology (Race and Ethnic Studies), Human Geography (Migration, Demography), Political Economy and Community Development.
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Southeastern Geographer

Innovations in Southern Studies, Winter 2011

Author: Robert Brinkmann,Graham A. Tobin

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807882879

Category: Social Science

Page: 152

View: 4907

Table of Contents for Volume 51, Number 4 (Winter 2011) Introduction: With Thanks Graham A. Tobin and Robert Brinkmann Innovations in Southern Studies within Geography Derek H. Alderman and William Graves The Bible Belt in a Changing South: Shrinking, Relocating, and Multiple Buckles Stanley D. Brunn, Gerald R. Webster, and J. Clark Archer Emerging Patterns of Growth and Change in the Southeast Benjamin J. Shultz Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation Joshua F. J. Inwood Jim Crow, Civil Defense, and the Hydrogen Bomb: Race, Evacuation Planning, and the Geopolitics of Fear in 1950s Savannah, Georgia Jonathan Leib and Thomas Chapman Representing the Immigrant: Social Movements, Political Discourse, and Immigration in the U.S. South Jamie Winders Water, Water, Everywhere? Toward a Critical Water Geography of the South Christopher F. Meindl The Politics of Mobility in the South: A Commentary on Sprawl,Automobility, and the Gulf Oil Spill Jason Henderson Southeastern Geographer is published by UNC Press for the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers (www.sedaag.org). The quarterly journal publishes the academic work of geographers and other social and physical scientists, and features peer-reviewed articles and essays that reflect sound scholarship and contain significant contributions to geographical understanding, with a special interest in work that focuses on the southeastern United States.
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Welcoming New Americans?

Local Governments and Immigrant Incorporation

Author: Abigail Fisher Williamson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022657265X

Category: Political Science

Page: 401

View: 1038

Even as Donald Trump’s election has galvanized anti-immigration politics, many local governments have welcomed immigrants, some even going so far as to declare their communities “sanctuary cities” that will limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities. But efforts to assist immigrants are not limited to large, politically liberal cities. Since the 1990s, many small to mid-sized cities and towns across the United States have implemented a range of informal practices that help immigrant populations integrate into their communities. Abigail Fisher Williamson explores why and how local governments across the country are taking steps to accommodate immigrants, sometimes despite serious political opposition. Drawing on case studies of four new immigrant destinations—Lewiston, Maine; Wausau, Wisconsin; Elgin, Illinois; and Yakima, Washington—as well as a national survey of local government officials, she finds that local capacity and immigrant visibility influence whether local governments take action to respond to immigrants. State and federal policies and national political rhetoric shape officials’ framing of immigrants, thereby influencing how municipalities respond. Despite the devolution of federal immigration enforcement and the increasingly polarized national debate, local officials face on balance distinct legal and economic incentives to welcome immigrants that the public does not necessarily share. Officials’ efforts to promote incorporation can therefore result in backlash unless they carefully attend to both aiding immigrants and increasing public acceptance. Bringing her findings into the present, Williamson takes up the question of whether the current trend toward accommodation will continue given Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and changes in federal immigration policy.
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Nashville in the New Millennium

Immigrant Settlement, Urban Transformation, and Social Belonging

Author: Jamie Winders

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610448022

Category: Social Science

Page: 340

View: 8006

Beginning in the 1990s, the geography of Latino migration to and within the United States started to shift. Immigrants from Central and South America increasingly bypassed the traditional gateway cities to settle in small cities, towns, and rural areas throughout the nation, particularly in the South. One popular new destination—Nashville, Tennessee—saw its Hispanic population increase by over 400 percent between 1990 and 2000. Nashville, like many other such new immigrant destinations, had little to no history of incorporating immigrants into local life. How did Nashville, as a city and society, respond to immigrant settlement? How did Latino immigrants come to understand their place in Nashville in the midst of this remarkable demographic change? In Nashville in the New Millennium, geographer Jamie Winders offers one of the first extended studies of the cultural, racial, and institutional politics of immigrant incorporation in a new urban destination. Moving from schools to neighborhoods to Nashville’s wider civic institutions, Nashville in the New Millennium details how Nashville’s long-term residents and its new immigrants experienced daily life as it transformed into a multicultural city with a new cosmopolitanism. Using an impressive array of methods, including archival work, interviews, and participant observation, Winders offers a fine-grained analysis of the importance of historical context, collective memories and shared social spaces in the process of immigrant incorporation. Lacking a shared memory of immigrant settlement, Nashville’s long-term residents turned to local history to explain and interpret a new Latino presence. A site where Latino day laborers gathered, for example, became a flashpoint in Nashville’s politics of immigration in part because the area had once been a popular gathering place for area teenagers in the 1960s and 1970s. Teachers also drew from local historical memories, particularly the busing era, to make sense of their newly multicultural student body. They struggled, however, to help immigrant students relate to the region’s complicated racial past, especially during history lessons on the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement. When Winders turns to life in Nashville’s neighborhoods, she finds that many Latino immigrants opted to be quiet in public, partly in response to negative stereotypes of Hispanics across Nashville. Long-term residents, however, viewed this silence as evidence of a failure to adapt to local norms of being neighborly. Filled with voices from both long-term residents and Latino immigrants, Nashville in the New Millennium offers an intimate portrait of the changing geography of immigrant settlement in America. It provides a comprehensive picture of Latino migration’s impact on race relations in the country and is an especially valuable contribution to the study of race and ethnicity in the South.
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The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 10: Law and Politics

Author: James W. Ely Jr.,Bradley G. Bond

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616742

Category: Reference

Page: 456

View: 2747

Volume 10 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture combines two of the sections from the original edition, adding extensive updates and 53 entirely new articles. In the law section of this volume, 16 longer essays address broad concepts ranging from law schools to family law, from labor relations to school prayer. The 43 topical entries focus on specific legal cases and individuals, including historical legal professionals, parties from landmark cases, and even the fictional character Atticus Finch, highlighting the roles these individuals have played in shaping the identity of the region. The politics section includes 34 essays on matters such as Reconstruction, social class and politics, and immigration policy. New essays reflect the changing nature of southern politics, away from the one-party system long known as the "solid South" to the lively two-party politics now in play in the region. Seventy shorter topical entries cover individual politicians, political thinkers, and activists who have made significant contributions to the shaping of southern politics.
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Transforming Politics, Transforming America

The Political and Civic Incorporation of Immigrants in the United States

Author: Taeku Lee,S. Karthick Ramakrishnan,Ricardo Ramírez

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813934206

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 9318

Over the past four decades, the foreign-born population in the United States has nearly tripled, from about 10 million in 1965 to more than 30 million today. This wave of new Americans comes in disproportionately large numbers from Latin America and Asia, a pattern that is likely to continue in this century. In Transforming Politics, Transforming America, editors Taeku Lee, S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, and Ricardo Ramírez bring together the newest work of prominent scholars in the field of immigrant political incorporation to provide the first comprehensive look at the political behavior of immigrants.Focusing on the period from 1965 to the year 2020, this volume tackles the fundamental yet relatively neglected questions, What is the meaning of citizenship, and what is its political relevance? How are immigrants changing our notions of racial and ethnic categorization? How is immigration transforming our understanding of mobilization, participation, and political assimilation? With an emphasis on research that brings innovative theory, quantitative methods, and systematic data to bear on such questions, this volume presents a provocative evidence-based examination of the consequences that these demographic changes might have for the contemporary politics of the United States as well as for the concerns, categories, and conceptual frameworks we use to study race relations and ethnic politics. Contributors Bruce Cain (University of California, Berkeley) * Grace Cho (University of Michigan) * Jack Citrin (University of California, Berkeley) * Louis DeSipio (University of California, Irvine) * Brendan Doherty (University of California, Berkeley) * Lisa García Bedolla (University of California, Irvine) * Zoltan Hajnal (University of California, San Diego) * Jennifer Holdaway (Social Science Research Council) * Jane Junn (Rutgers University) * Philip Kasinitz (City University of New York) * Taeku Lee (University of California, Berkeley) * John Mollenkopf (City University of New York) * Tatishe Mavovosi Nteta (University of California, Berkeley) * Kathryn Pearson (University of Minnesota) * Kenneth Prewitt (Columbia University) * S. Karthick Ramakrishnan (University of California, Riverside) * Ricardo Ramírez (University of Southern California) * Mary Waters (Harvard University) * Cara Wong (University of Michigan) * Janelle Wong (University of Southern California)
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Migrants to the Metropolis

The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities

Author: Marie Price,Lisa Benton-Short

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815631866

Category: Social Science

Page: 428

View: 9586

A collection of essays examining contemporary global immigration trends and their profound effect on specific host cities. It provides a global portrait of accelerating, worldwide immigration driven by income differentials, social networks, and various state policies that recruit skilled and unskilled laborers.
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The Politics of Immigration

Contradictions of the Liberal State

Author: James Hampshire

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 0745638996

Category: Political Science

Page: 185

View: 2944

Shows how four defining facets of the liberal state (representative democracy, constitutionalism, capitalism, and nationhood) generate conflicting imperatives for immigration policymaking, which in turn give rise to contradictory policies.
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Bringing Outsiders in

Transatlantic Perspectives on Immigrant Political Incorporation

Author: Jennifer L. Hochschild,John H. Mollenkopf

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801475146

Category: Political Science

Page: 381

View: 8726

Leading social scientists present individual cases and work toward a comparative synthesis of how immigrants affect—and are affected by—civic life on both sides of the Atlantic.
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One Out of Three

Immigrant New York in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Nancy Foner

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535139

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 3939

This absorbing anthology features in-depth portraits of diverse ethnic populations, revealing the surprising new realities of immigrant life in twenty-first-century New York City. Contributors show how nearly fifty years of massive inflows have transformed New York City's economic and cultural life and how the city has changed the lives of immigrant newcomers. Nancy Foner's introduction describes New York's role as a special gateway to America. Subsequent essays focus on the Chinese, Dominicans, Jamaicans, Koreans, Liberians, Mexicans, and Jews from the former Soviet Union now present in the city and fueling its population growth. They discuss both the large numbers of undocumented Mexicans living in legal limbo and the new, flourishing community organizations offering them opportunities for advancement. They recount the experiences of Liberians fleeing a war torn country and their creation of a vibrant neighborhood on Staten Island's North Shore. Through engaging, empathetic portraits, contributors consider changing Korean-owned businesses and Chinese Americans' increased representation in New York City politics, among other achievements and social and cultural challenges. A concluding chapter follows the prospects of the U.S.-born children of immigrants as they make their way in New York City.
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Immigration and the Changing Social Fabric of American Cities

Author: John MacDonald,Robert J. Sampson

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1452256527

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 2100

This volume of The ANNALS brings together a leading set of scholars to present new research on trends in the spatial forms of immigration that are transforming the American landscape—the effects of “the world in a city.” With a distinct analytic focus, the volume takes a comparative approach, examining recent immigration trends, disaggregating by ethnicity or immigrant type wherever possible, focusing on core features of the nation’s social fabric (e.g., violence, legitimacy of social institutions, governance, economic well-being), and empirically going beyond the big cities of traditional concern to a host of smaller cities and towns reaching into far-flung pockets of the country. The lineup includes papers on both familiar cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Miami; as well as places as different as San Antonio; Nashville; Boston; Dublin; Hazleton, Pennsylvania; and St. James, Minnesota. While the places studied and features of their social fabric may differ, the social processes underlying the spatial forms of immigration are shown to be largely the same. This volume will be of interest to social scientists from a broad range of disciplines who engage in research and teaching on issues related to immigration; policy-makers; and individuals working on immigration-policy research.
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The Columbia Documentary History of Race and Ethnicity in America

Author: Ronald H. Bayor

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231508409

Category: History

Page: 1104

View: 1945

All historians would agree that America is a nation of nations. But what does that mean in terms of the issues that have moved and shaped us as a people? Contemporary concerns such as bilingualism, incorporation/assimilation, dual identity, ethnic politics, quotas and affirmative action, residential segregation, and the volume of immigration resonate with a past that has confronted variations of these modern issues. The Columbia Documentary History of Race and Ethnicity in America, written and compiled by a highly respected team of American historians under the editorship of Ronald Bayor, illuminates the myriad ways in which immigration, racial, and ethnic histories have shaped the contours of contemporary American society. This invaluable resource documents all eras of the American past, including black–white interactions and the broad spectrum of American attitudes and reactions concerning Native Americans, Irish Catholics, Mexican Americans, Jewish Americans, and other groups. Each of the eight chronological chapters contains a survey essay, an annotated bibliography, and 20 to 30 related public and private primary source documents, including manifestos, speeches, court cases, letters, memoirs, and much more. From the 1655 petition of Jewish merchants regarding the admission of Jews to the New Netherlands colony to an interview with a Chinese American worker regarding a 1938 strike in San Francisco, documents are drawn from a variety of sources and allow students and others direct access to our past. Selections include Powhatan to John Smith, 1609 Thomas Jefferson—"Notes on the State of Virginia" Petition of the Trustees of Congregation Shearith Israel, 1811 Bessie Conway or, The Irish Girl in America German Society in Chicago, Annual Report, 1857–1858. "Mark Twain's Salutation to the Century" W. E. B. DuBois, "Of Our Spiritual Strivings" NAACP on Black Schoolteachers'Fight for Equal Pay Malcom X speech, 1964 Hewy Newton interview and Black Panther Party platform Preamble—La Raza Unida Party Lee lacocca speech to Ethnic Heritage Council of the Pacific Northwest, 1984 Native American Graves and Repatriation Act, 1990 L.A. riot—from the Los Angeles Times, May 3, 15, 1992; Nov. 16, 19, 1992 Asian American Political Alliance President Clinton's Commission on Race, Town Meeting, 1997 Louis Farrakhan—"The Vision for the Million Man March"
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The Politics of Immigration in France, Britain, and the United States

A Comparative Study

Author: M. Schain

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137047895

Category: Political Science

Page: 334

View: 7723

Updated through 2012 with all-new material in every chapter, Schain's book provides a detailed, comparative look at the policies that drive and inform immigration politics in three Western countries, and shows how immigration policy has political sources far beyond labor market needs.
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Migration, Transnationalization, and Race in a Changing New York

Author: Héctor R. Cordero-Guzmán,Robert C. Smith,Ramón Grosfoguel

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781566398886

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7108

In this work, 19 scholars from a range of disciplines discuss New York's immigrant communities. They explore the interaction between economic globalization and transnationalization, demographic change, and the evolving racial, ethnic and gender dynamics in the city.
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Unsettled Americans

Metropolitan Context and Civic Leadership for Immigrant Integration

Author: John Mollenkopf,Manuel Pastor

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501703951

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 5344

The politics of immigration have heated up in recent years as Congress has failed to adopt comprehensive immigration reform, the President has proposed executive actions, and state and local governments have responded unevenly and ambivalently to burgeoning immigrant communities in the context of a severe economic downturn. Moreover we have witnessed large shifts in the locations of immigrants and their families between and within the metropolitan areas of the United States. Charlotte, North Carolina, may be a more active and dynamic immigrant destination than Chicago, Illinois, while the suburbs are receiving ever more immigrants. The work of John Mollenkopf, Manuel Pastor, and their colleagues represents one of the first systematic comparative studies of immigrant incorporation at the metropolitan level. They consider immigrant reception in seven different metro areas, and their analyses stress the differences in capacity and response between central cities, down-at-the-heels suburbs, and outer metropolitan areas, as well as across metro areas. A key feature of case studies in the book is their inclusion of not only traditional receiving areas (New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles) but also newer ones (Charlotte, Phoenix, San Jose, and California's "Inland Empire"). Another innovative aspect is that the authors link their work to the new literature on regional governance, contribute to emerging research on spatial variations within metropolitan areas, and highlight points of intersection with the longer-term processes of immigrant integration. Contributors: Els de Graauw, CUNY; Juan De Lara, University of Southern California; Jaime Dominguez, Northwestern University; Diana Gordon, CUNY; Michael Jones-Correa, Cornell University; Paul Lewis, Arizona State University; Doris Marie Provine, Arizona State University; John Mollenkopf, CUNY; Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California; Rachel Rosner, independent consultant, Florida; Jennifer Tran, City of San Francisco
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Anthropology of Migration and Multiculturalism

New Directions

Author: Steven Vertovec

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317989309

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 8931

The field of anthropology of migration and multiculturalism is booming. Throughout its hundred-odd year history, studies of migration and diverse or ‘plural’ societies have arguably been both marginal and central to the discipline of Anthropology. However, recent years have witnessed the rapid growth of anthropological studies concerning these topics. This has particularly been the case since the 1970s, when anthropologists developed a keen interest in the subject of ethnicity, especially in post-migration communities. Since the 1990s, migrant transnationalism has become one of the most fashionable topics. There is still much to do in research and theory surrounding this field, not least with regard to contemporary public debates around multiculturalism, immigration and ‘integration’ policy. This book presents essays pointing toward a number of possible new directions – both theoretical and methodological – for anthropological inquiry into migration and multiculturalism, including innovative ways of examining diversity discourses, urban conditions, social complexities, scales of analysis, transnational marriages, entangled politics and interwoven cultures. This book was published as a special issue of the Ethnic and Racial Studies.
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