The Nebraska-Kansas Act of 1854

Author: John R. Wunder,Joann M. Ross

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803248168

Category: Law

Page: 220

View: 5819

The Nebraska-Kansas Act of 1854 turns upside down the traditional way of thinking about one of the most important laws ever passed in American history. The act that created Nebraska and Kansas also, in effect, abolished the Missouri Compromise, which had prohibited slavery in the region since 1820. This bow to local control outraged the nation and led to vicious confrontations, including Kansas' subsequent mini-civil war. At the 150th anniversary of the Kansas-Nebraska Act these scholars reexamine the political, social, and personal contexts of this act and its effect on the course of American history.
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The Reader's Companion to American History

Author: Eric Foner,John A. Garraty

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547561342

Category: History

Page: 1248

View: 6442

An A-to-Z historical encyclopedia of US people, places, and events, with nearly 1,000 entries “all equally well written, crisp, and entertaining” (Library Journal). From the origins of its native peoples to its complex identity in modern times, this unique alphabetical reference covers the political, economic, cultural, and social history of America. A fact-filled treasure trove for history buffs, The Reader’s Companion is sponsored by the Society of American Historians, an organization dedicated to promoting literary excellence in the writing of biography and history. Under the editorship of the eminent historians John A. Garraty and Eric Foner, a large and distinguished group of scholars, biographers, and journalists—nearly four hundred contemporary authorities—illuminate the critical events, issues, and individuals that have shaped our past. Readers will find everything from a chronological account of immigration; individual entries on the Bull Moose Party and the Know-Nothings as well as an article on third parties in American politics; pieces on specific religious groups, leaders, and movements and a larger-scale overview of religion in America. Interweaving traditional political and economic topics with the spectrum of America’s social and cultural legacies—everything from marriage to medicine, crime to baseball, fashion to literature—the Companion is certain to engage the curiosity, interests, and passions of every reader, and also provides an excellent research tool for students and teachers.
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The crime against Kansas

The apologies for the crime. The true remedy

Author: Charles Sumner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Kansas

Page: 95

View: 823

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Profiles in Courage

Author: John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Publisher: Harper Perennial

ISBN: 9780060806989

Category: Courage

Page: 282

View: 331

"This is a book about the most admirable of human virtues--courage. 'Grace under pressure,' Ernest Hemingway defined it. And these are the stories of the pressures experienced by eight United States Senators and the grace with which they endured them." -- John F. Kennedy During 1954-55, John F. Kennedy, then a U.S. Senator, chose eight of his historical coleagues to profile for their acts of astounding integrity in the face of overwhelming opposition. These heroes include John Quincy Adams, Daniel Webster, Thomas Hart Benson, and Robert A. Taft. Awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1956, Profiles in Courage resounds with timeless lessons on themost cherished of virtues and is a powerful reminder of the strength of the human spirit. It is, as Robert Kennedy states in the foreword, "not just stories of the past but a book of hope and confidence for the future. What happens to the country, to the world, depends on what we do with what others have left us.
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The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393080827

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 981

“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.
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War to the Knife

Bleeding Kansas, 1854-1861

Author: Thomas Goodrich

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803271142

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 848

A powerful narrative of the bloody prologue to the Civil War, "War to the Knife" covers the 1854 shooting war between pro-slavery men in Missouri and free-staters in Kansas over control of the Kansas territory. 30 photos.
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Seeding Civil War

Kansas in the National News, 1854-1858

Author: H. Craig Miner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 6130

This study of the national media coverage devoted to the Kansas Territory reveals how the heated, polarizing rhetoric widened the sectional rift, weakened chances of accommodation, and contributed more to the onset of the Civil War than has been previously recognized.
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Sunflower Justice

A New History of the Kansas Supreme Court

Author: R. Alton Lee

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803254105

Category: Law

Page: 376

View: 1962

Until recently, American legal historiography focused almost solely on national government. Although much of Kansas law reflects U.S. law, the state courtês arbitrary powers over labor-management conflicts, yellow dog contracts, civil rights, gender issues, and domestic relations set precedents that reverberated around the country. Sunflower Justice is a pioneering work that presents the history of a state through the use of its supreme court decisions as evidence. ¾ R. Alton Lee traces Kansasês legal history through 150 years of records, shedding light on the stateês political, economic, and social history in this groundbreaking overview of Kansas legal cases and judicial biographies. Beginning with the territorial justices and continuing through the late twentieth century, R. Alton Lee covers the dispossession of Native Americansê land, the growth and impact of labor unions, antimonopoly cases against railroad and mining companies, a nine-year state ban on the movie Birth of a Nation, and implications and effects of desegregation, as well as the shooting of Dr. George Tiller for performing legal abortions. Because judicial decisions are not made in a vacuum, Lee presents each of the justices in the context of the era and their personal experiences before examining how their decisions shaped Kansas political, economic, social, and legal history.
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Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865

Author: Jay Monaghan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803236059

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 2388

The first phase of the Civil War was fought west of the Mississippi River at least six years before the attack on Fort Sumter. Starting with the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, Jay Monaghan traces the development of the conflict between the pro-slavery elements from Missouri and the New England abolitionists who migrated to Kansas. "Bleeding Kansas" provided a preview of the greater national struggle to come. The author allows a new look at Quantrill's sacking of Lawrence, organized bushwhackery, and border battles that cost thousands of lives. Not the least valuable are chapters on the American Indians’ part in the conflict. The record becomes devastatingly clear: the fighting in the West was the cruelest and most useless of the whole affair, and if men of vision had been in Washington in the 1850s it might have been avoided.
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Seward

Lincoln's Indispensable Man

Author: Walter Stahr

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439121184

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 703

View: 478

Presents a profile of the leader of Lincoln's "team of rivals," examining the many political roles he had in his lifetime, including governor of New York, Secretary of State, and Lincoln's closest advisor during the Civil War.
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The Failure of Popular Sovereignty

Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics

Author: Christopher Childers

Publisher: American Political Thought (Un

ISBN: 9780700618682

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 9815

The first major history of popular sovereignty. Uses popular sovereignty as a lens for viewing the radicalization of southern states' rights politics, demonstrating how this misbegotten offspring of slavery and Manifest Destiny, though intended to assuage passions, instead worsened sectional differences, radicalized southerners, and paved the way for secession.
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The F Street Mess

How Southern Senators Rewrote the Kansas-Nebraska Act

Author: Alice Elizabeth Malavasic

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469635534

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 2205

Pushing back against the idea that the Slave Power conspiracy was merely an ideological construction, Alice Elizabeth Malavasic argues that some southern politicians in the 1850s did indeed hold an inordinate amount of power in the antebellum Congress and used it to foster the interests of slavery. Malavasic focuses her argument on Senators David Rice Atchison of Missouri, Andrew Pickens Butler of South Carolina, and Robert M. T. Hunter and James Murray Mason of Virginia, known by their contemporaries as the "F Street Mess" for the location of the house they shared. Unlike the earlier and better-known triumvirate of John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, and Daniel Webster, the F Street Mess was a functioning oligarchy within the U.S. Senate whose power was based on shared ideology, institutional seniority, and personal friendship. By centering on their most significant achievement--forcing a rewrite of the Nebraska bill that repealed the restriction against slavery above the 36 degrees 30′ parallel--Malavasic demonstrates how the F Street Mess's mastery of the legislative process led to one of the most destructive pieces of legislation in United States history and helped pave the way to secession.
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Uncle Tom's Cabin

Or, Life Among the Lowly

Author: Harriet Beecher Stowe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fugitive slaves

Page: 490

View: 6231

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In Cold Storage

Sex and Murder on the Plains

Author: James W. Hewitt

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803280734

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 8390

In 1973 the small southwest Nebraska railroad town of McCook became the unlikely scene of a grisly murder. More than forty years later, author James W. Hewitt returns to the scene and unearths new details about what happened. After pieces of Edwin and Wilma Hoyt's dismembered bodies were found floating on the surface of a nearby lake, authorities charged McCook resident Harold Nokes and his wife, Ena, with murder. Harold pleaded guilty to murder and Ena pleaded guilty to two counts of wrongful disposal of a dead body, but the full story of why and how he murdered the Hoyts has never been told. Hewitt interviews law enforcement officers, members of the victims' family, weapons experts, and forensic psychiatrists, and delves into newspaper reports and court documents from the time. Most significant, Harold granted Hewitt his first and only interview, in which the convicted murderer changed several parts of his 1974 confession. In Cold Storage takes readers through the evidence, including salacious details of sex and intrigue between the Hoyts and the Nokeses, and draws new conclusions about what really happened between the two families on that fateful September night.
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The Half Has Never Been Told

Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

Author: Edward E. Baptist

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097685

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 1701

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end—and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.
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A Dirty, Wicked Town

Tales of 19th Century Omaha

Author: David L. Bristow

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN: 0870045326

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1426

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press "It requires but little if any, stretch of the imagination to regard Omaha as a cesspool of iniquity, for it is given up to lawlessness and is overrun with a horde of fugitives from justice and dangerous men of all kinds who carry things with a high hand and a loose rein... If you want to find a rogue's rookery, go to Omaha." A Kansas City newspaper.
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Lone Wolf V. Hitchcock

Treaty Rights and Indian Law at the End of the Nineteenth Century

Author: Blue Clark

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803264014

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 6395

Landmark court cases in the history of formal U.S. relations with Indian tribes are Corn Tassel, Standing Bear, Crow Dog, and Lone Wolf. Each exemplifies a problem or a process as the United States defined and codified its politics toward Indians. The importance of the Lone Wolf case of 1903 resides in its enunciation of the "plenary power" doctrine?that the United States could unilaterally act in violation of its own treaties and that Congress could dispose of land recognized by treaty as belonging to individual tribes. In 1892 the Kiowas and related Comanche and Plains Apache groups were pressured into agreeing to divide their land into allotments under the terms of the Dawes Act of 1887. Lone Wolf, a Kiowa band leader, sued to halt the land division, citing the treaties signed with the United States immediately after the Civil War. In 1902 the case reached the Supreme Court, which found that Congress could overturn the treaties through the doctrine of plenary power. As he recounts the Lone Wolf case, Clark reaches beyond the legal decision to describe the Kiowa tribe itself and its struggles to cope with Euro-American pressure on its society, attitudes, culture, economic system, and land base. The story of the case therefore also becomes the history of the tribe in the late nineteenth century. The Lone Wolf case also necessarily becomes a study of the Dawes Allotment Act of 1887 in operation; under the terms of the Dawes Act and successor legislation, almost two-thirds of Indian lands passed out of their hands within a generation. Understanding how this happened in the case of the Kiowa permits a nuanced view of the well-intentioned but ultimately disastrous allotment effort.
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Practicing Law in Frontier California

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803262607

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 2839

In Practicing Law in Frontier California Gordon Morris Bakken combines collective biography with an analysis of the function of the bar in a rapidly changing socioeconomic setting. Drawing on manuscript collections, Bakken considers hundreds of men and women who came to California to practice law during the gold rush and later, their reasons for coming, their training, and their usefulness to clients during a period of rapid population growth and social turmoil. He shows how law practice changed over the decades with the establishment of large firms and bar associations, how the state's boom-and-bust economy made debt collection the lawyer's bread and butter, and how personal injury and criminal cases and questions of property rights were handled. In Bakken's book frontier lawyers become complex human beings, contributing to and protecting the social and economic fabric of society, expanding their public roles even as their professional expertise becomes more narrowly specialized.
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To Make Men Free

A History of the Republican Party

Author: Heather Cox Richardson

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465080669

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6839

A distinguished American historian traces the paradoxical evolution of the Republican Party—founded to give the poor equal opportunity, but too often aligned with the country's elites.
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The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Author: Abraham Lincoln,Stephen Arnold Douglas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: 158

View: 3786

Text of the seven debates and an account of their political setting, with annotations.
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