The Meaningful Writing Project

Learning, Teaching and Writing in Higher Education

Author: Michele Eodice,Anne Ellen Geller,Neal Lerner

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325802

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 182

View: 7543

In the face of the continuing discourse of crisis in US education, The Meaningful Writing Project offers readers an affirming story of writing in higher education that shares students’ experiences in their own voices. In presenting the results of a three-year study consisting of surveys and interviews of university seniors and their faculty across three diverse institutions, authors Michele Eodice, Anne Ellen Geller, and Neal Lerner consider students’ perceptions of their meaningful writing experiences, the qualities of those experiences, and instructors’ perspectives on assignment design and delivery. This study confirms that meaningful assignments offer students opportunities to engage with instructors, peers, and texts and are relevant to past experiences and passions as well as to future aspirations and identities. Meaningful writing occurs across majors, in both required and elective courses, and beyond students’ years at college. Additionally, the study makes clear that faculty across the curriculum devote significant care and attention to creating writing assignments that support student learning, as they understand writing performance to be a developmental process connected to overall cognitive and social development, student engagement with learning, and success in a wide variety of disciplines and professions. The Meaningful Writing Project provides writing center directors, WPAs, other composition scholars, and all faculty interested in teaching and learning with writing an unprecedented look into the writing projects students find meaningful.
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The Meaningful Writing Project

Learning, Teaching and Writing in Higher Education

Author: Michele Eodice,Anne Ellen Geller,Neal Lerner

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325799

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 3675

"Unprecedented look into the writing projects students find meaningful. The results of a three-year study consisting of surveys and interviews of seniors and faculty across three diverse institutions that consider the qualities of experiences, students' perceptions of their experiences, and analyze instructors' perspectives on assignment design/delivery "--Provided by publisher.
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Learning to Communicate in Science and Engineering

Case Studies from MIT

Author: Mya Poe,Neal Lerner,Jennifer Craig

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262162474

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 6436

Case studies and pedagogical strategies to help science and engineering students improve their writing and speaking skills while developing professional identities. To many science and engineering students, the task of writing may seem irrelevant to their future professional careers. At MIT, however, students discover that writing about their technical work is important not only in solving real-world problems but also in developing their professional identities. MIT puts into practice the belief that "engineers who don't write well end up working for engineers who do write well," requiring all students to take "communications-intensive" classes in which they learn from MIT faculty and writing instructors how to express their ideas in writing and in presentations. Students are challenged not only to think like professional scientists and engineers but also to communicate like them.This book offers in-depth case studies and pedagogical strategies from a range of science and engineering communication-intensive classes at MIT. It traces the progress of seventeen students from diverse backgrounds in seven classes that span five departments. Undergraduates in biology attempt to turn scientific findings into a research article; graduate students learn to define their research for scientific grant writing; undergraduates in biomedical engineering learn to use data as evidence; and students in aeronautic and astronautic engineering learn to communicate collaboratively. Each case study is introduced by a description of its theoretical and curricular context and an outline of the objectives for the students' activities. The studies describe the on-the-ground realities of working with faculty, staff, and students to achieve communication and course goals, offering lessons that can be easily applied to a wide variety of settings and institutions.
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The Idea of a Writing Laboratory

Author: Neal Lerner

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809386623

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 9029

The Idea of a Writing Laboratory is a book about possibilities, about teaching and learning to write in ways that can transform both teachers and students. Author Neal Lerner explores higher education’s rich history of writing instruction in classrooms, writing centers and science laboratories. By tracing the roots of writing and science educators’ recognition that the method of the lab––hands-on student activity—is essential to learning, Lerner offers the hope that the idea of a writing laboratory will be fully realized more than a century after both fields began the experiment. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, writing instructors and science teachers recognized that mass instruction was inadequate for a burgeoning, “non-traditional” student population, and that experimental or laboratory methods could prove to be more effective. Lerner traces the history of writing instruction via laboratory methods and examines its successes and failures through case studies of individual programs and larger reform initatives. Contrasting the University of Minnesota General College Writing Laboratory with the Dartmouth College Writing Clinic, for example, Lerner offers a cautionary tale of the fine line between experimenting with teaching students to write and “curing” the students of the disease of bad writing. The history of writing within science education also wends its way through Lerner’s engaging work, presenting the pedagogical origins of laboratory methods to offer educators in science in addition to those in writing studies possibilities for long-sought after reform. The Idea of a Writing Laboratory compels readers and writers to “don those white coats and safety glasses and discover what works” and asserts that “teaching writing as an experiment in what is possible, as a way of offering meaning-making opportunities for students no matter the subject matter, is an endeavor worth the struggle.”
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Student Writing in the Quantitative Disciplines

A Guide for College Faculty

Author: Patrick Bahls

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118205820

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 8757

Designing interesting problems and writing assignments is one of the chief tasks of all teachers, but it can be especially challenging to translate and apply learning theory, good teaching techniques, and writing assignments into STEM and other quantitative disciplines. Student Writing in the Quantitative Disciplines offers instructors in math-based disciplines meaningful approaches to making their coursework richer and more relevant for their students, as well as satisfying institutional imperatives for writing curricula. This important resource provides instructors with the hands-on skills needed to guide their students in writing well in quantitative courses at all levels of the college curriculum and to promote students' general cognitive and intellectual growth. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes: Ideas for using writing as a means of learning mathematical concepts Illustrative examples of effective writing activities and assignments in a number of different genres Assessment criteria and effective strategies for responding to students' writing Examples of ways to help students engage in peer review, revision, and resubmission of their written work "Those of us who spend our lives urging faculty in all disciplines to integrate more writing into their courses have wished for the day when someone like Patrick Bahls would step forward with a book like this one."—Chris M. Anson, University Distinguished Professor and director, Campus Writing and Speaking Program, North Carolina State University "Written by a mathematician, this readable, theoretically sound book describes practical strategies for teachers in the quantitative sciences to assign and respond to students' writing. It also describes numerous approaches to writing that engage students in disciplinary learning, collaborative discovery, and effective communication."—Art Young, Campbell Professor of English emeritus, Clemson University "Loaded with practical advice, this timely, important, and engaging book will be an invaluable resource for instructors wishing to bring the benefits of writing-to-learn to the quantitative disciplines. As a mathematician thoroughly grounded in writing-across-the-curriculum scholarship, Bahls brings humor, classroom experience, and pedagogical savvy to a mission he clearly loves—improving the quality of student learning in math and science."—John C. Bean, professor, Seattle University, and author, Engaging Ideas
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Agents of Integration

Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act

Author: Rebecca S. Nowacek

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809330482

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 167

View: 7479

The question of how students transfer knowledge is an important one, as it addresses the larger issue of the educational experience. In Agents of Integration: Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act, Rebecca S. Nowacek explores, through a series of case studies, the issue of transfer by asking what in an educational setting engages students to become “agents of integration”— individuals actively working to perceive, as well as to convey effectively to others, the connections they make. While many studies of transfer are longitudinal, with data collected over several years, Nowacek’s is synchronous, a rich cross-section of the writing and classroom discussions produced by a team-taught learning community—three professors and eighteen students enrolled in a one-semester general education interdisciplinary humanities seminar that consisted of three linked courses in history, literature, and religious studies. With extensive field notes, carefully selected student and teacher self-reports in the form of interviews and focus groups, and thorough examinations of recorded classroom discussions, student papers with professor comments, and student notebooks, Nowacek presents a nuanced and engaging analysis that outlines how transfer is not simply a cognitive act but a rhetorical one that involves both seeing connections and presenting them to the instructors who are institutionally positioned to recognize and value them. Considering the challenges facing instructors teaching for transfer and the transfer of writing-related knowledge, Nowacek develops and outlines a new theoretical framework and methodological model of transfer and illustrates the practical implications through case studies and other classroom examples. She proposes transfer is best understood as an act of recontextualization, and she builds on this premise throughout the book by drawing from previous work in cognitive psychology, activity theory, and rhetorical genre theory, as well as her own analyses of student work. This focused examination complements existing longitudinal studies and will help readers better understand not only the opportunities and challenges confronting students as they work to become agents of integration but also the challenges facing instructors as they seek to support that student work.
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Writing Studio Pedagogy

Space, Place, and Rhetoric in Collaborative Environments

Author: Matthew Kim,Russell Carpenter

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1475828233

Category: Education

Page: 238

View: 8419

Writing Studio Pedagogy (WSP) breaks from the tradition of teaching and responding to writing in traditional ways and moves the teaching and learning experience off the page and into engaging spaces in multiple ways, which can enhance the composing process. Through this collection, scholars interested in rethinking approaches to teaching, writing pedagogy, and innovative learning will find new ways to challenge their own understandings of space, place, and collaboration. WSP involves an attention to space and place in the development of rhetorical acts by focusing on the ways in which they enhance pedagogy. This book takes a unique opportunity to return to pedagogy as the foremost priority in any learning space. Educators might preference WSP for its emphasis on student-centeredness by creating productive interactions, intersections, and departures that arrive from prioritizing learning. WSP acknowledges the centralized role of students and teachers as co-facilitators in learning and writing. These threads are intentionally broad-based, as the chapters contained in this book speak to the complexity of WSP across institutions.
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Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning

Author: Linda Adler-Kassner,Peggy O'Neill

Publisher: Utah State University Press

ISBN: 9780874217988

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 8099

Adler-Kassner and O'Neill show writing faculty and administrators how to frame discussions of writing assessment so that they accurately represent research-based practices, and promote assessments that are valid, reliable, and discipline-appropriate. Public discourse about writing instruction is currently driven by ideas of what instructors and programs “need to do,” “should do,” or “are not doing,” and is based on poorly informed concepts of correctness and unfounded claims about a broad decline in educational quality. This discussion needs to be reframed, say Adler-Kassner and O'Neill, to help policymakers understand that the purpose of writing instruction is to help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing strategies that will form the foundation for their future educations, professional careers, and civic engagement. Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning is grounded in the best of writing assessment research, and focuses on how to communicate it effectively to publics beyond academe.
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Transiciones

Author: Todd Ruecker

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1457188732

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 4606

Transiciones is a thorough ethnography of seven Latino students in transition between high school and community college or university. Data gathered over two years of interviews with the students, their high school English teachers, and their writing teachers and administrators at postsecondary institutions reveal a rich picture of the conflicted experience of these students as they attempted to balance the demands of schooling with a variety of personal responsibilities. Todd Ruecker explores the disconnect between students’ writing experiences in high school and higher education and examines the integral role that writing plays in college. Considering the almost universal requirement that students take a writing class in their critical first year of college, he contends that it is essential for composition researchers and teachers to gain a fuller understanding of the role they play in supporting and hindering Latina and Latino students’ transition to college. Arguing for situating writing programs in larger discussions of high school / college alignment, student engagement, and retention, Transiciones raises the profile of what writing programs can do, while calling composition teachers, administrators, and scholars to engage in more collaboration across the institution, across institutions, and across disciplines to make the transition from high school to college writing more successful for this important group of students.
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Assignments across the Curriculum

A National Study of College Writing

Author: Dan Melzer

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1492012823

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 4565

In Assignments across the Curriculum, Dan Melzer analyzes the rhetorical features and genres of writing assignments through the writing-to-learn and writing-in-the-disciplines perspectives. Presenting the results of his study of 2,101 writing assignments from undergraduate courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, business, and humanities in 100 postsecondary institutions in the United States, Assignments across the Curriculum is unique in its cross-institutional breadth and its focus on writing assignments. The results provide a panoramic view of college writing in the United States. Melzer's framework begins with the rhetorical situations of the assignments—the purposes and audiences—and broadens to include the assignments' genres and discourse community contexts. Among his conclusions is that courses connected to a writing-across-the-curriculum (WAC) initiative ask students to write more often, in a greater variety of genres, and for a greater variety of purposes and audiences than non-WAC courses do, making a compelling case for the influence of the WAC movement. Melzer's work also reveals patterns in the rhetorical situations, genres, and discourse communities of college writing in the United States. These larger patterns are of interest to WAC practitioners working with faculty across disciplines, to writing center coordinators and tutors working with students who bring assignments from a variety of fields, to composition program administrators, to first-year writing instructors interested in preparing students for college writing, and to high school teachers attempting to bridge the gap between high school and college writing.
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The Politics of Writing Studies

Reinventing Our Universities from Below

Author: Robert Samuels

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325845

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 7850

A friendly critique of the field, The Politics of Writing Studies examines a set of recent pivotal texts in composition to show how writing scholarship, in an effort to improve disciplinary prestige and garner institutional resources, inadvertently reproduces structures of inequality within American higher education. Not only does this enable the exploitation of contingent faculty, but it also puts writing studies—a field that inherently challenges many institutional hierarchies—in a debased institutional position and at odds with itself. Instead of aligning with the dominant paradigm of research universities, where research is privileged over teaching, theory over practice, the sciences over the humanities, and graduate education over undergraduate, writing studies should conceive itself in terms more often associated with labor. By identifying more profoundly as workers, as a collective in solidarity with contingent faculty, writing professionals can achieve solutions to the material problems that the field, in its best moments, wants to address. Ultimately, the change compositionists want to see in the university will not come from high theory or the social science research agenda; it must come from below. Offering new insight into a complex issue, The Politics of Writing Studies will be of great interest to writing studies professionals, university administrators, and anyone interested in the political economy of education and the reform of institutions of higher education in America.
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Writing Assessment in the 21st Century

Essays in Honor of Edward M. White

Author: Norbert Elliot,Leslie C. Perelman

Publisher: Hampton Press (NJ)

ISBN: 9781612890876

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 518

View: 3269

For over forty years Eddward M. White, author of various seminal works in insturction and evaluation, has led debates about accountability by focusing on student learning. In this edited collection, thirty-five leaders in assessment pay tribute to Professor Wite by documenting the landscape, stragegies, consequence and future of the field. Readers will find in these chapters the beginning of a new phase in writing assessment, one informed by a appreciation of complexity and a devotion to fiarness that marked the career of the scholar honored in these pages
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Around the Texts of Writing Center Work

An Inquiry-Based Approach to Tutor Education

Author: R. Mark Hall

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325829

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 181

View: 1092

Around the Texts of Writing Center Work reveals the conceptual frameworks found in and created by ordinary writing center documents. The values and beliefs underlying course syllabi, policy statements, website copy and comments, assessment plans, promotional flyers, and annual reports critically inform writing center practices, including the vital undertaking of tutor education. In each chapter, author R. Mark Hall focuses on a particular document. He examines its origins, its use by writing center instructors and tutors, and its engagement with enduring disciplinary challenges in the field of composition, such as tutoring and program assessment. He then analyzes each document in the contexts of the conceptual framework at the heart of its creation and everyday application: activity theory, communities of practice, discourse analysis, reflective practice, and inquiry-based learning. Around the Texts of Writing Center Work approaches the analysis of writing center documents with an inquiry stance—a call for curiosity and skepticism toward existing and proposed conceptual frameworks—in the hope that the theoretically conscious evaluation and revision of commonplace documents will lead to greater efficacy and more abundant research by writing center administrators and students.
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Nowhere Near the Line

Pain and Possibility in Teaching and Writing

Author: Elizabeth Boquet

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325764

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 40

View: 9199

“When I was starting College Presidents for Gun Safety, one of the concerns I heard was the idea that there were just too many issues on which to articulate an opinion. Where would it stop? Where would we draw the line? . . . In light of this latest tragedy, on a college campus that could have been any of ours, I would say: ‘We are nowhere near the line yet.’” (Lawrence Schall, quoted in “Tragedy at Umpqua,” by Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed, October 2, 2015) In this short work, Elizabeth Boquet explores the line Lawrence Schall describes above, tracing the overlaps and intersections of a lifelong education around guns and violence, as a student, a teacher, a feminist, a daughter, a wife, a citizen and across the dislocations and relocations that are part of a life lived in and around school. Weaving narratives of family, the university classroom and administration, her husband’s work as a police officer, and her work with students and the Poetry for Peace effort that her writing center sponsors in the local schools, she recounts her efforts to respond to moments of violence with a pedagogy of peace. “Can we not acknowledge that our experiences with pain anywhere should render us more, not less, capable of responding to it everywhere?” she asks. “Compassion, it seems to me, is an infinitely renewable resource.”
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Writing and reading differently

deconstruction and the teaching of composition and literature

Author: George Douglas Atkins,Michael L. Johnson,Nancy R. Comley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 216

View: 1549

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Securing a Place for Reading in Composition

The Importance of Teaching for Transfer

Author: Ellen C. Carillo

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874219604

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 2461

Securing a Place for Reading in Composition addresses the dissonance between the need to prepare students to read, not just write, complex texts and the lack of recent scholarship on reading-writing connections. Author Ellen C. Carillo argues that including attention-to-reading practices is crucial for developing more comprehensive literacy pedagogies. Students who can read actively and reflectively will be able to work successfully with the range of complex texts they will encounter throughout their post-secondary academic careers and beyond. Considering the role of reading within composition from both historical and contemporary perspectives, Carillo makes recommendations for the productive integration of reading instruction into first-year writing courses. She details a “mindful reading” framework wherein instructors help students cultivate a repertoire of approaches upon which they consistently reflect as they apply them to various texts. This metacognitive frame allows students to become knowledgeable and deliberate about how they read and gives them the opportunity to develop the skills useful for moving among reading approaches in mindful ways, thus preparing them to actively and productively read in courses and contexts outside first-year composition. Securing a Place for Reading in Composition also explores how the field of composition might begin to effectively address reading, including conducting research on reading, revising outcome statements, and revisiting the core courses in graduate programs. It will be of great interest to writing program administrators and other compositionists and their graduate students.
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A Rhetoric of Reflection

Author: Kathleen Yancey

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325160

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 338

View: 4821

Reflection in writing studies is now entering a third generation. Dating from the 1970s, the first generation of reflection focused on identifying and describing internal cognitive processes assumed to be part of composing. The second generation, operating in both classroom and assessment scenes in the 1990s, developed mechanisms for externalizing reflection, making it visible and thus explicitly available to help writers. Now, a third generation of work in reflection is emerging. As mapped by the contributors to A Rhetoric of Reflection, this iteration of research and practice is taking up new questions in new sites of activity and with new theories. It comprises attention to transfer of writing knowledge and practice, teaching and assessment, portfolios, linguistic and cultural difference, and various media, including print and digital. It conceptualizes conversation as a primary reflective medium, both inside and outside the classroom and for individuals and collectives, and articulates the role that different genres play in hosting reflection. Perhaps most important in the work of this third generation is the identification and increasing appreciation of the epistemic value of reflection, of its ability to help make new meanings, and of its rhetorical power—for both scholars and students. Contributors: Anne Beaufort, Kara Taczak, Liane Robertson, Michael Neal, Heather Ostman, Cathy Leaker, Bruce Horner, Asao B. Inoue, Tyler Richmond, J. Elizabeth Clark, Naomi Silver, Christina Russell McDonald, Pamela Flash, Kevin Roozen, Jeff Sommers, Doug Hesse
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Retention, Persistence, and Writing Programs

Author: Todd Ruecker,Dawn Shepherd,Heidi Estrem,Beth Brunk-Chavez

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607326027

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 286

View: 7339

From scholars working in a variety of institutional and geographic contexts and with a wide range of student populations, Retention, Persistence, and Writing Programs offers perspectives on how writing programs can support or hinder students’ transitions to college. The contributors present individual and program case studies, student surveys, a wealth of institutional retention data, and critical policy analysis. Rates of student retention in higher education are a widely acknowledged problem: although approximately 66 percent of high school graduates begin college, of those who attend public four-year institutions, only about 80 percent return the following year, with 58 percent graduating within six years. At public two-year institutions, only 60 percent of students return, and fewer than a third graduate within three years. Less commonly known is the crucial effect of writing courses on these statistics. First-year writing is a course that virtually all students have to take; thus, writing programs are well-positioned to contribute to larger institutional conversations regarding retention and persistence and should offer themselves as much-needed sites for advocacy, research, and curricular innovation. Retention, Persistence, and Writing Programs is a timely resource for writing program administrators as well as for new writing teachers, advisors, administrators, and state boards of education. Contributors: Matthew Bridgewater, ​Cristine Busser, Beth Buyserie, Polina Chemishanova, ​Michael Day, ​Bruce Feinstein, ​Patricia Freitag Ericsson, ​Nathan Garrett, ​Joanne Baird Giordano, ​Tawanda Gipson, ​Sarah E. Harris, Mark Hartlaub, ​Holly Hassel, ​Jennifer Heinert, ​Ashley J. Holmes, ​Rita Malenczyk, ​Christopher P. Parker, ​Cassandra Phillips, ​Anna Plemons, ​Pegeen Reichert Powell, ​Marc Scott, Robin Snead, ​Sarah Elizabeth Snyder, ​Sara Webb-Sunderhaus, ​Susan Wolff Murphy
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Everyday Writing Center

A Community of Practice

Author: Anne Ellen Geller,Michele Eodice,Frankie Condon,Meg Carroll,Elizabeth Boquet

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874216621

Category: Education

Page: 152

View: 1503

In a landmark collaboration, five co-authors develop a theme of ordinary disruptions ("the everyday") as a source of provocative learning moments that can liberate both student writers and writing center staff. At the same time, the authors parlay Etienne Wenger’s concept of "community of practice" into an ethos of a dynamic, learner-centered pedagogy that is especially well-suited to the peculiar teaching situation of the writing center. They push themselves and their field toward deeper, more significant research, more self-conscious teaching.
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Composition, Rhetoric, and Disciplinarity

Author: Rita Malenczyk,Susan Miller-Cochran,Elizabeth Wardle,Kathleen Yancey

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607326957

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 362

View: 5124

Edited by four nationally recognized leaders of composition scholarship, Composition, Rhetoric, and Disciplinarity asks a fundamental question: can Composition and Rhetoric, as a discipline, continue its historical commitment to pedagogy without sacrificing equal attention to other areas, such as research and theory? In response, contributors to the volume address disagreements about what it means to be called a discipline rather than a profession or a field; elucidate tensions over the defined breadth of Composition and Rhetoric; and consider the roles of research and responsibility as Composition and Rhetoric shifts from field to discipline. Outlining a field with a complex and unusual formation story, Composition, Rhetoric, and Disciplinarity employs several lenses for understanding disciplinarity—theory, history, labor, and pedagogy—and for teasing out the implications of disciplinarity for students, faculty, institutions, and Composition and Rhetoric itself. Collectively, the chapters speak to the intellectual and embodied history leading to this point; to questions about how disciplinarity is, and might be, understood, especially with regard to Composition and Rhetoric; to the curricular, conceptual, labor, and other sites of tension inherent in thinking about Composition and Rhetoric as a discipline; and to the implications of Composition and Rhetoric’s disciplinarity for the future. Contributors: Linda Adler-Kassner, Elizabeth H. Boquet, Christiane Donahue, Whitney Douglas, Doug Downs, Heidi Estrem, Kristine Hansen, Doug Hesse, Sandra Jamieson, Neal Lerner, Jennifer Helene Maher, Barry Maid, Jaime Armin Mejía, Carolyn R. Miller, Kelly Myers, Gwendolynne Reid, Liane Robertson, Rochelle Rodrigo, Dawn Shepherd, Kara Taczak
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