The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0786729260

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 7814

Universally acclaimed when first published in 1955, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit captured the mood of a generation. Its title — like Catch-22 and Fahrenheit 451 — has become a part of America's cultural vocabulary. Tom Rath doesn't want anything extraordinary out of life: just a decent home, enough money to support his family, and a career that won't crush his spirit. After returning from World War II, he takes a PR job at a television network. It is inane, dehumanizing work. But when a series of personal crises force him to reexamine his priorities — and take responsibility for his past — he is finally moved to carve out an identity for himself. This is Sloan Wilson's searing indictment of a society that had just begun to lose touch with its citizens. The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit is a classic of American literature and the basis of the award-winning film starring Gregory Peck. "A consequential novel." — Saturday Review
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What shall we wear to this party?

The man in the gray flannel suit twenty years before & after

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Arbor House Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 442

View: 2361

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Beyond the Gray Flannel Suit

Books from the 1950s that Made American Culture

Author: David Castronovo

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826416261

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 207

View: 5566

Discusses the major literary works of the 1950s, which introduced new forms and dealt with such controversial topics as racial discrimination, religious differences, and social class.
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The Man in the Grey Flannel Skirt

Author: Jon-Jon Goulian

Publisher: UWA Publishing

ISBN: 1742583717

Category: Androgyny (Psychology)

Page: 294

View: 4295

Jon-Jon Goulian is a very complex man. He was blessed with a privileged and liberal upbringing - his father a doctor, his mother a lawyer and his grandfather the renowned pragmatic philosopher Sidney Hook. For five years he worked as an assistant to Robert Silvers, the much-loved and redoubtable editor of The New York Review of Books. He also has a law degree he has hardly used and then there's the fact that he wears skirts, nail polish and surrounds himself with an army of stuffed toys for succour. Jon-Jon has spent his late teens, twenties and thirties somewhat adrift - in and out of employment and generally confusing all those who met him. THE MAN IN THE GRAY FLANNEL SKIRT is a riveting account of a very intelligent man growing up left of centre, trying to work out who he is and where he fits, both personally and privately.
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The Organization Man

Author: William H. Whyte

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812209265

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 4430

Regarded as one of the most important sociological and business commentaries of modern times, The Organization Man developed the first thorough description of the impact of mass organization on American society. During the height of the Eisenhower administration, corporations appeared to provide a blissful answer to postwar life with the marketing of new technologies—television, affordable cars, space travel, fast food—and lifestyles, such as carefully planned suburban communities centered around the nuclear family. William H. Whyte found this phenomenon alarming. As an editor for Fortune magazine, Whyte was well placed to observe corporate America; it became clear to him that the American belief in the perfectibility of society was shifting from one of individual initiative to one that could be achieved at the expense of the individual. With its clear analysis of contemporary working and living arrangements, The Organization Man rapidly achieved bestseller status. Since the time of the book's original publication, the American workplace has undergone massive changes. In the 1990s, the rule of large corporations seemed less relevant as small entrepreneurs made fortunes from new technologies, in the process bucking old corporate trends. In fact this "new economy" appeared to have doomed Whyte's original analysis as an artifact from a bygone day. But the recent collapse of so many startup businesses, gigantic mergers of international conglomerates, and the reality of economic globalization make The Organization Man all the more essential as background for understanding today's global market. This edition contains a new foreword by noted journalist and author Joseph Nocera. In an afterword Jenny Bell Whyte describes how The Organization Man was written.
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An Ordinary Spy

A Novel

Author: Joseph Weisberg

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1596913762

Category: Fiction

Page: 276

View: 606

A former CIA agent's thrilling novel about two compassionate CIA spies, who, at the risk of their respective careers, both try to keep their informants out of harms way.
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A Novel Marketplace

Mass Culture, the Book Trade, and Postwar American Fiction

Author: Evan Brier

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812201442

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 3502

As television transformed American culture in the 1950s, critics feared the influence of this newly pervasive mass medium on the nation's literature. While many studies have addressed the rhetorical response of artists and intellectuals to mid-twentieth-century mass culture, the relationship between the emergence of this culture and the production of novels has gone largely unexamined. In A Novel Marketplace, Evan Brier illuminates the complex ties between postwar mass culture and the making, marketing, and reception of American fiction. Between 1948, when television began its ascendancy, and 1959, when Random House became a publicly owned corporation, the way American novels were produced and distributed changed considerably. Analyzing a range of mid-century novels—including Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, Sloan Wilson's The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, and Grace Metalious's Peyton Place—Brier reveals the specific strategies used to carve out cultural and economic space for the American novel just as it seemed most under threat. During this anxious historical moment, the book business underwent an improbable expansion, by capitalizing on an economic boom and a rising population of educated consumers and by forming institutional alliances with educators and cold warriors to promote reading as both a cultural and political good. A Novel Marketplace tells how the book trade and the novelists themselves successfully positioned their works as embattled holdouts against an oppressive mass culture, even as publishers formed partnerships with mass-culture institutions that foreshadowed the multimedia mergers to come in the 1960s. As a foil for and a partner to literary institutions, mass media corporations assisted in fostering the novel's development as both culture and commodity.
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Pacific Interlude

A Novel

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 149768966X

Category: Fiction

Page: 314

View: 1676

During the last days of World War II, a young officer braves enemy fire and a maverick crew on the open waters and in the steamy ports of the South Pacific Twenty-five-year-old Coast Guard lieutenant Sylvester Grant, a veteran of the Greenland Patrol, has just been given command of a small gas tanker, running shuttle and convoy duties for the US Army. Sally, his wife of three years, is eager for him to get back to Massachusetts and live a conventional suburban life selling insurance—but Syl longs for adventure and is bound to find it as the captain of a beat-up, unseaworthy vessel carrying extremely flammable cargo across dangerous stretches of the Pacific Ocean. As the Allies prepare to retake the Philippines, the only thing the sailors aboard the Y-18 want is for the war to be over. First, however, they must survive their mission to bring two hundred thousand gallons of high-octane aviation fuel to shore. From below-deck personality clashes to the terrifying possibility of an enemy attack, from combating illness and boredom to the constant stress of preventing an explosion that could blow their ship sky high, the crew of the Y-18 must learn to work together and trust their captain—otherwise, they might never make it home. Based on Sloan Wilson’s own experiences, Pacific Interlude is a thrilling and realistic story of World War II and a moving portrait of a man looking toward the future while trying to survive a precarious present.
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Buttoned Up

Clothing, Conformity, and White-Collar Masculinity

Author: Erynn Masi de Casanova

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501700952

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 6258

Who is today's white-collar man? The world of work has changed radically since The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit and other mid-twentieth-century investigations of corporate life and identity. Contemporary jobs are more precarious, casual Friday has become an institution, and telecommuting blurs the divide between workplace and home. Gender expectations have changed, too, with men's bodies increasingly exposed in the media and scrutinized in everyday interactions. In Buttoned Up, based on interviews with dozens of men in three U.S. cities with distinct local dress cultures—New York, San Francisco, and Cincinnati—Erynn Masi de Casanova asks what it means to wear the white collar now. Despite the expansion of men’s fashion and grooming practices, the decrease in formal dress codes, and the relaxing of traditional ideas about masculinity, white-collar men feel constrained in their choices about how to embody professionalism. They strategically embrace conformity in clothing as a way of maintaining their gender and class privilege. Across categories of race, sexual orientation and occupation, men talk about "blending in" and "looking the part" as they aim to keep their jobs or pursue better ones. These white-collar workers’ accounts show that greater freedom in work dress codes can, ironically, increase men’s anxiety about getting it wrong and discourage them from experimenting with their dress and appearance.
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Ice Brothers

A Novel

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1497689635

Category: Fiction

Page: 532

View: 2696

The bestselling World War II adventure story based on Sloan Wilson’s experiences as a Coast Guard officer on the Greenland patrol After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Paul Schuman, a college senior and summer sailor, enlists in the Coast Guard. His beautiful, mercurial wife, Sylvia, wants him to stay at home in Massachusetts, but Paul is ready for adventure and eager to serve his country. His active duty begins when, without a day of training, he is assigned to be the executive officer aboard the Arluk, a converted fishing trawler patrolling the coast of Greenland for secret German weather bases. At the helm of the Arluk is Lt. Cdr. “Mad” Mowry, the finest ice pilot and meanest drunk in the Coast Guard. Paul has a lot to learn from his captain, but not as much as communications officer Nathan Greenberg does. A Brooklyn engineer, Nathan does not know the difference between a ship’s bow and its stern. No matter how nasty Mowry might be, Schuman and Greenberg have to pay close attention, because deadly icebergs, dangerous blizzards, and menacing Nazi gunboats lurk along the frigid Arctic coastline. Surviving the war, Schuman soon realizes, will require every ounce of courage and intelligence he possesses—and that is before Mowry breaks down and the young officer is forced to take command of the Arluk and its crew at the worst possible moment. A masterful blend of high drama and convincing realism, Ice Brothers is a true classic of World War II and one of Sloan Wilson’s finest novels.
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A Summer Place

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Untreed Reads

ISBN: 1611871131

Category: Fiction

Page: 219

View: 2847

First published in 1958 and then turned into a film of the same name in 1959 featuring Troy Donahue, Sandra Dee, Dorothy McGuire and Richard Egan, this classic romance is available for the first time in ebook format. Ken and Sylvia met twice at the Summer Place. The first summer they were in their teens. Their intimacy was without love. They'd met too early. The second summer they shouldn't have fallen in love...and did. They were in their thirties-married-each with children. Had they met too late? Ken and Sylvia decided to break two marriages to make the one they wanted together. They almost broke a third that hadn't even started yet. Because Ken's daughter and Sylvia's son met at the Summer Place. They were in their teens. For them, it was neither too early nor too late. This novel is about how marriages are made on earth-and unmade. It is about the price people pay for changing their minds about love.
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Revolutionary Road

The Easter Parade ; Eleven Kinds of Loneliness

Author: Richard Yates

Publisher: Everyman's Library

ISBN: 0307270890

Category: Fiction

Page: 661

View: 9657

A trio of classic works from a master American novelist features the author's first novel, Revolutionary Road, the story of a disintegrating marriage; The Easter Parade, about two sisters whose parents' divorce affects their entire lives; and Eleven Kinds of Loneliness, a collection of short stories. 17,500 first printing.
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The Best of Everything

Author: Rona Jaffe

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101127155

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 3779

When Rona Jaffe’s superb page-turner was first published in 1958, it changed contemporary fiction forever. Some readers were shocked, but millions more were electrified when they saw themselves reflected in its story of five young employees of a New York publishing company. Almost sixty years later, The Best of Everything remains touchingly—and sometimes hilariously—true to the personal and professional struggles women face in the city. There’s Ivy League Caroline, who dreams of graduating from the typing pool to an editor’s office; naïve country girl April, who within months of hitting town reinvents herself as the woman every man wants on his arm; and Gregg, the free-spirited actress with a secret yearning for domesticity. Jaffe follows their adventures with intelligence, sympathy, and prose as sharp as a paper cut.
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The Girls in 3-B

Author: Valerie Taylor

Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 1558617620

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 2027

Annice, Pat, and Barby are best friends from Iowa, freshly arrived in booming 1950s Chicago to explore different paths toward independence, self-expression, and sexual freedom. From the hip-hang of a bohemian lifestyle to the sophisticated lure of romance with a handsome, wealthy, married boss to the happier security of a lesbian relationship, these three experience firsthand the dangers and limitations of women’s economic reliance on men. Lesbian pulp author Valerie Taylor skillfully paints a sociological portrait of the emotional and economic pitfalls of heterosexuality in 1950s America—and then offers a defiantly subversive alternative. A classic pulp tale showcasing predatory beatnik men, drug hallucinations, and secret lesbian trysts, The Girls in 3-B approaches the theme of sex from the stiffened vantage point of 1950s psychology. Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women’s writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century. From mystery to hard-boiled noir to taboo lesbian romance, these rediscovered queens of pulp offer subversive perspectives on a turbulent era. Enjoy the series: Bedelia; Bunny Lake Is Missing; By Cecile; The G-String Murders; The Girls in 3-B; Laura; The Man Who Loved His Wife; Mother Finds a Body; Now, Voyager; Return to Lesbos; Skyscraper; Stranger on Lesbos; Stella Dallas; Women's Barracks.
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SOMETHING HAPPENED

Author: Joseph Heller

Publisher: Dell

ISBN: 0307803619

Category: Fiction

Page: 576

View: 4197

Bob Slocum was living the American dream. He had a beautiful wife, three lovely children, a nice house...and all the mistresses he desired. He had it all -- all, that is, but happiness. Slocum was discontent. Inevitably, inexorably, his discontent deteriorated into desolation until...something happened. Something Happened is Joseph Heller's wonderfully inventive and controversial second novel satirizing business life and American culture. The story is told as if the reader was overhearing the patter of Bob Slocum's brain -- recording what is going on at the office, as well as his fantasies and memories that complete the story of his life. The result is a novel as original and memorable as his Catch-22.
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Perfectly Average

The Pursuit of Normality in Postwar America

Author: Anna G. Creadick

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558498060

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 8508

Analyzes the ascendancy of the cultural ideal of the "normal" in the aftermath of World War II
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Men in the Middle

Searching for Masculinity in the 1950s

Author: James Gilbert

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226293240

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 1660

While the 1950s have been popularly portrayed-on television and in the movies and literature-as a conformist and conservative age, the decade is better understood as a revolutionary time for politics, economy, mass media, and family life. Magazines, films, newspapers, and television of the day scrutinized every aspect of this changing society, paying special attention to the lifestyles of the middle-class men and their families who were moving to the suburbs newly springing up outside American cities. Much of this attention focused on issues of masculinity, both to enforce accepted ideas and to understand serious departures from the norm. Neither a period of "male crisis" nor yet a time of free experimentation, the decade was marked by contradiction and a wide spectrum of role models. This was, in short, the age of Tennessee Williams as well as John Wayne. In Men in the Middle, James Gilbert uncovers a fascinating and extensive body of literature that confronts the problems and possibilities of expressing masculinity in the 1950s. Drawing on the biographies of men who explored manhood either in their writings or in their public personas, Gilbert examines the stories of several of the most important figures of the day-revivalist Billy Graham, playwright Tennessee Williams, sociologist David Riesman, sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, Playboy literary editor Auguste Comte Spectorsky, and TV-sitcom dad Ozzie Nelson-and allows us to see beyond the inherited stereotypes of the time. Each of these stories, in Gilbert's hands, adds crucial dimensions to our understanding of masculinity the 1950s. No longer will this era be seen solely in terms of the conformist man in the gray flannel suit or the Marlboro Man.
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Challenger Park

Author: Stephen Harrigan

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0307264742

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 6702

From the author of the acclaimed and best-selling The Gates of the Alamo, a novel of extraordinary power about what it’s like, and what it means, to journey into space as one of today’s astronauts. At the novel’s center: Lucy Kincheloe, an astronaut married to an astronaut, the loving mother of two young children, with a fierce ambition to excel in the space program. Her husband, Brian, a rigorous man whose dreams of glory have been blighted by two star-crossed missions. Walt Womack, the steady, unflappable leader of the training team that prepares Lucy for her first shuttle flight. Lucy has devoted years of intense and focused effort to win her place on a mission, but as her lifelong dream of flying in space comes true, her familiar world appears to be falling apart around her. Her marriage is deteriorating. Her son’s asthma is growing more serious. Her relationship with Walt Womack is becoming dangerously intimate. And when at last she is in space, 240 miles above the earth, and an accident renders the world she left behind appallingly distant—perhaps unreachable—her spirit is tested in gripping and unexpected ways. In The Gates of the Alamo, Stephen Harrigan’s narrative authority brought a vanished nineteenth-century Texas to vibrant life. In Challenger Park, he does the same with the world of space flight, bringing us up close to the lives—the risks, the friendships, the rituals, the training—of the astronauts and the people who work with them. Harrigan has written an exciting—indeed a thrilling—novel about the contrary pulls of home and adventure, reality and dreams, and the unimaginable experience, the joys and terrors and revelations, of space flight itself. From the Hardcover edition.
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Iron John

A Book about Men

Author: Robert Bly

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306824272

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5383

In this timeless and deeply learned classic, poet and translator Robert Bly offers nothing less than a new vision of what it means to be a man. Bly's vision is based on his ongoing work with men, as well as on reflections on his own life. He addresses the devastating effects of remote fathers and mourns the disappearance of male initiation rites in our culture. Finding rich meaning in ancient stories and legends, Bly uses the Grimm fairy tale "Iron John"Ñin which a mentor or "Wild Man" guides a young man through eight stages of male growthÑto remind us of ways of knowing long forgotten, images of deep and vigorous masculinity centered in feeling and protective of the young. At once down-to-earth and elevated, combining the grandeur of myth with the practical and often painful lessons of our own histories, Iron John is an astonishing work that will continue to guide and inspire menÑand womenÑfor years to come.
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