Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States

With a Preliminary Review of the Constitutional History of the Colonies and States Before the Adoption of the Constitution

Author: Joseph Story,Thomas M. Cooley

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584778784

Category: History

Page: 1530

View: 6248

Reprint of the important fourth edition edited by Thomas M. Cooley. This was the most extensive and widely discussed study of the Constitution written during the antebellum period. Divided into three books, it offers a strongly nationalist interpretation of the Federal constitution. Book I contains a history of the colonies and a discussion of their charters. Book II discusses the Continental Congress and analyzes the f laws that crippled the Articles of Confederation. Book III begins with a history of the Constitution and its ratification. This is followed by a brilliant line-by-line exposition of each of its articles and amendments. Published in 1873, Cooley's edition updated Story's text to include discussion of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments, as well as other changes introduced during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
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A Government by the People

Direct Democracy in America, 1890-1940

Author: Thomas Goebel

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860182

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4005

Between 1898 and 1918, many American states introduced the initiative, referendum, and recall--known collectively as direct democracy. Most interpreters have seen the motives for these reform measures as purely political, but Thomas Goebel demonstrates that the call for direct democracy was deeply rooted in antimonopoly sentiment. Frustrated with the governmental corruption and favoritism that facilitated the rise of monopolies, advocates of direct democracy aimed to check the influence of legislative bodies and directly empower the people to pass laws and abolish trusts. But direct democracy failed to achieve its promises: corporations and trusts continued to flourish, voter turnout rates did not increase, and interest groups grew stronger. By the 1930s, it was clear that direct democracy favored large organizations with the financial and organizational resources to fund increasingly expensive campaigns. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of direct democracy, particularly in California, where ballot questions and propositions have addressed such volatile issues as gay rights and affirmative action. In this context, Goebel's analysis of direct democracy's history, evolution, and ultimate unsuitability as a grassroots tool is particularly timely.
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North Carolinians in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction

Author: Paul D. Escott

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837261

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3846

Although North Carolina was a "home front" state rather than a battlefield state for most of the Civil War, it was heavily involved in the Confederate war effort and experienced many conflicts as a result. North Carolinians were divided over the issue of secession, and changes in race and gender relations brought new controversy. Blacks fought for freedom, women sought greater independence, and their aspirations for change stimulated fierce resistance from more privileged groups. Republicans and Democrats fought over power during Reconstruction and for decades thereafter disagreed over the meaning of the war and Reconstruction. With contributions by well-known historians as well as talented younger scholars, this volume offers new insights into all the key issues of the Civil War era that played out in pronounced ways in the Tar Heel State. In nine essays composed specifically for this volume, contributors address themes such as ambivalent whites, freed blacks, the political establishment, racial hopes and fears, postwar ideology, and North Carolina women. These issues of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras were so powerful that they continue to agitate North Carolinians today. Contributors: David Brown, Manchester University Judkin Browning, Appalachian State University Laura F. Edwards, Duke University Paul D. Escott, Wake Forest University John C. Inscoe, University of Georgia Chandra Manning, Georgetown University Barton A. Myers, University of Georgia Steven E. Nash, University of Georgia Paul Yandle, West Virginia University Karin Zipf, East Carolina University
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