The Forgotten Highlander

An Incredible WWII Story of Survival in the Pacific

Author: Alistair Urquhart

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1628731508

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 371

Alistair Urquhart was a soldier in the Gordon Highlanders, captured by the Japanese in Singapore. Forced into manual labor as a POW, he survived 750 days in the jungle working as a slave on the notorious “Death Railway” and building the Bridge on the River Kwai. Subsequently, he moved to work on a Japanese “hellship,” his ship was torpedoed, and nearly everyone on board the ship died. Not Urquhart. After five days adrift on a raft in the South China Sea, he was rescued by a Japanese whaling ship. His luck would only get worse as he was taken to Japan and forced to work in a mine near Nagasaki. Two months later, he was just ten miles from ground zero when an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. In late August 1945, he was freed by the American Navy—a living skeleton—and had his first wash in three and a half years. This is the extraordinary story of a young man, conscripted at nineteen, who survived not just one, but three encounters with death, any of which should have probably killed him. Silent for over fifty years, this is Urquhart’s inspirational tale in his own words. It is as moving as any memoir and as exciting as any great war movie.
Release

The Forgotten Highlander

An Incredible WWII Story of Survival in the Pacific

Author: Alistair Urquhart

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN: 161608152X

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 7331

A Scottish solder tells of being captured by the Japanese, sentenced to slave labor in work camps, enduring days adrift at sea after the Japanese ship carrying him and hundreds of other POWs was torpedoed by an American submarine, and his experience working outdoors near Nagasaki, Japan when the atomic bomb hit the city.
Release

The Forgotten Highlander

My Story of Survival During the War in the Far East

Author: Alastair Urquhart

Publisher: Hachette Digital

ISBN: 9781405507660

Category:

Page: 176

View: 7198

Alistair Urquhart was a soldier in the Gordon Highlanders captured by the Japanese in Singapore. He not only survived working on the notorious Bridge on the River Kwai , but he was subsequently taken on one of the Japanese 'hellships' which was torpedoed. Nearly everyone else on board died and Urquhart spent 5 days alone on a raft in the South China Sea before being rescued by a whaling ship. He was taken to Japan and then forced to work in a mine near Nagasaki. Two months later a nuclear bomb dropped just ten miles away . . .This is the extraordinary story of a young men, conscripted at nineteen and whose father was a Somme Veteran, survived not just one, but three close encounters with death - encounters which killed nearly all his comrades.
Release

Tomorrow You Die

The Astonishing Survival Story of a Second World War Prisoner of the Japanese

Author: Andy Coogan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1780574584

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 1582

Andy Coogan was born in Glasgow in 1917, the oldest child of poor Irish immigrants. He was tipped for Olympic glory, but a promising running career was interrupted by war service. His capture during the fall of Singapore marked the beginning of a three-and-a-half-year nightmare of starvation, torture and disease. Andy was imprisoned in the notorious Changi camp before being transported to Taiwan, where he worked as a slave in a copper mine and was twice ordered to dig his own grave. He was later taken to Japan on a hellship voyage that nearly killed him, but Andy’s athleticism and spirit enable him to survive an ordeal in which many died. From his poverty-stricken boyhood in the slums of the Gorbals to the atomic wasteland of Nagasaki, Andy’s life story is vividly recounted in Tomorrow You Die, an epic, compassionate tale that will shock, enthral and inspire.
Release

The Forgotten Highlander

An Incredible WWII Story of Survival in the Pacific

Author: Alistair Urquhart

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1628731508

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9310

Alistair Urquhart was a soldier in the Gordon Highlanders, captured by the Japanese in Singapore. Forced into manual labor as a POW, he survived 750 days in the jungle working as a slave on the notorious “Death Railway” and building the Bridge on the River Kwai. Subsequently, he moved to work on a Japanese “hellship,” his ship was torpedoed, and nearly everyone on board the ship died. Not Urquhart. After five days adrift on a raft in the South China Sea, he was rescued by a Japanese whaling ship. His luck would only get worse as he was taken to Japan and forced to work in a mine near Nagasaki. Two months later, he was just ten miles from ground zero when an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. In late August 1945, he was freed by the American Navy—a living skeleton—and had his first wash in three and a half years. This is the extraordinary story of a young man, conscripted at nineteen, who survived not just one, but three encounters with death, any of which should have probably killed him. Silent for over fifty years, this is Urquhart’s inspirational tale in his own words. It is as moving as any memoir and as exciting as any great war movie.
Release

Survivor on the River Kwai

The Incredible Story of Life on the Burma Railway

Author: Reg Twigg

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241965101

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 4475

Survivor on the River Kwai is the heartbreaking story of Reg Twigg, one of the last men standing from a forgotten war. Called up in 1940, Reg expected to be fighting Germans. Instead, he found himself caught up in the worst military defeat in modern British history - the fall of Singapore to the Japanese. What followed were three years of hell, moving from one camp to another along the Kwai river, building the infamous Burma railway for the all-conquering Japanese Imperial Army. Some prisoners coped with the endless brutality of the code of Bushido by turning to God; others clung to whatever was left of the regimental structure. Reg made the deadly jungle, with its malaria, cholera, swollen rivers, lethal snakes and exhausting heat, work for him. With an ingenuity that is astonishing, he trapped and ate lizards, harvested pumpkins from the canteen rubbish heap and with his homemade razor became camp barber. That Reg survived is testimony to his own courage and determination, his will to beat the alien brutality of camp guards who had nothing but contempt for him and his fellow POWs. He was a risk taker whose survival strategies sometimes bordered on genius. Reg's story is unique. Reg Twigg was born at Wigston (Leicester) barracks on 16 December 1913. He was called up to the Leicestershire Regiment in 1940 but instead of fighting Hitler he was sent to the Far East, stationed at Singapore. When captured by the Japanese, he decided he would do everything to survive. After his repatriation from the Far East, Reg returned to Leicester. With his family he returned to Thailand in 2006, and revisited the sites of the POW camps. Reg died in 2013, at the age of ninety-nine, two weeks before the publication of this book.
Release

Prisoner of Japan

A Personal War Diary - Singapore, Siam and Burma 1941-1945

Author: Sir Harold Atcherley

Publisher: Memoirs Publishing

ISBN: 1909304557

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 404

View: 2138

In the latter part of WW2, more than a ... million European and American soldiers were taken prisoner by the Japanese in Malaysia. They went on to suffer deprivation and brutality, most of them failing to survive. I was fortunate enough to be one of the survivors. During my time as a prisoner I kept a diary, which I was able to bring home with me.
Release

Death on the Hellships

Author: Gregory Michno

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1682470253

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 6080

Though the Japanese treatment of prisoners of war during World War II has been written about before, only with this detailed chronicle will readers come to appreciate the true dimensions of the Allied POW experience at sea. It is a disturbing story; many believe the Bataan Death March pales by comparison. Survivors describe their ordeal in the Japanese hellships as the absolute worst experience of their captivity. Crammed by the thousands into the holds of the ships, moved from island to island and put to work, they endured all the horrors of the prison camps magnified tenfold. Gregory Michno draws on American, British, Australian, and Dutch POW accounts as well as Japanese convoy histories, recently declassified radio intelligence reports, and a wealth of archival sources to present a detailed picture of what happened. His findings are startling. More than 126,00 Allied prisoners were transported in the hellships with more than 21,000 fatalities. While beatings, starvation, and disease caused many of the deaths, the most, Michno reports, were caused by Allied bombs. Bullets, and torpedoes. He further reports that this so-called friendly fire was not always accidental—at times high-level decision were made to sink Japanese ships despite the presence of POWs. The statistics led Michno to conclude that it was more dangerous to be a prisoner on the Japanese hellships than a U.S. Marine fighting in the campaign. His careful examination of the role U.S. submarines in the sinkings and the rescue of POWs makes yet another significant contribution to the history of the Pacific war.
Release

Singapore Burning

Heroism and Surrender in World War II

Author: Colin Smith

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141906626

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 1314

Churchill's description of the fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942, after Lt-Gen Percival's surrender led to over 100,000 British, Australian and Indian troops falling into the hands of the Japanese, was no wartime exaggeration. The Japanese had promised that there would be no Dunkirk in Singapore, and its fall led to imprisonment, torture and death for thousands of allied men and women. With much new material from British, Australian, Indian and Japanese sources, Colin Smith has woven together the full and terrifying story of the fall of Singapore and its aftermath. Here, alongside cowardice and incompetence, are forgotten acts of enormous heroism; treachery yet heart-rending loyalty; Japanese compassion as well as brutality from the bravest and most capricious enemy the British ever had to face.
Release

Scattered Under the Rising Sun

The Gordon Highlanders in the Far East, 1941-1945

Author: Stewart Mitchell

Publisher: Pen & Sword

ISBN: 9781781590256

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 6560

2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders was posted to Singapore in 1937 with their families. When the Japanese invaded Malaya in December 1941, the Battalion fought bravely until the surrender of Singapore on 14 February 1942. Those who were not killed became POWs. Of the 1000 men involved initially, over 400 had died by their liberation in summer 1945. Despite the diverse background of the members of the Battalion, all were bound by close regimental spirit. As POWs, all suffered hard labour, starvation, brutality and tropical diseases. Rank was no protection from death. After initial incarceration in Singapore the Gordons were dispersed to work on the famous Thai-Burma railway, in the mines of Taiwan and Japan and on other slave labour projects. Conditions defy modern comprehension. Others died trapped in hell-ships torpedoed by allied submarines. The author has researched the plight of these extraordinary men, so many of whom never saw their native Scotland again. Despite the grim conditions, he captures the strong collective regimental spirit and the humour and cooperation that saved so many who would have otherwise have perished – as many did. This is an inspiring tale of courage and survival against appalling odds.
Release

Belly of the Beast

A POW's Inspiring True Story of Faith, Courage, and Survival Aboard the Infamous WWII Japanese Hell Ship Oryoku Maru

Author: Judith L. Pearson

Publisher: Diversion Publishing Corp.

ISBN: 1626812918

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5608

“A searing tribute . . . [to] America in its bleakest hour” (Senator John McCain, New York Times–bestselling author of Faith of My Fathers). On December 13, 1944, POW Estel Myers was herded aboard the Japanese prison ship, the Oryoku Maru, with more than 1,600 other American captives. More than 1,100 of them would be dead by journey’s end . . . The son of a Kentucky sharecropper and an enlistee in the Navy’s medical corps, Myers arrived in Manila shortly before the bombings of Pearl Harbor and the other six targets of the Imperial Japanese military. While he and his fellow corpsmen tended to the bloody tide of soldiers pouring into their once peaceful Naval hospital, the Japanese overwhelmed the Pacific islands, capturing 78,000 POWs by April 1942. Myers was one of the first captured. After a brutal three-year encampment, Myers and his fellow POWs were forced onto an enemy hell ship bound for Japan. Suffocation, malnutrition, disease, dehydration, infestation, madness, and simple despair claimed the lives of nearly three quarters of those who boarded “the beast.” Myers survived. A compelling account of a rarely recorded event in military history, this is more than Estel Myers’ true story—this is an homage to the unfailing courage of men at war, an inspiring chronicle of self-sacrifice and endurance, and a tribute to the power of faith, the strength of the soul, and the triumph of the human spirit. “An inspiring look at one of World War II’s darkest hours.” —James Bradley, #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Flags of our Fathers and Flyboys “A searing chronicle.” —Kirkus Reviews
Release

Surviving the Sword

Prisoners of the Japanese, 1942-45

Author: Brian MacArthur

Publisher: Abacus Software

ISBN: 9780349119373

Category: Prisoners of war

Page: 494

View: 2166

Many of the prisoners held by the Japanese during the WWII were so scarred by their experiences that they could not discuss them even with their families. They believed that their brutal treatment was, literally, incomprehensible. But some prisoners were determined that posterity should know how they were starved and beaten, marched almost to death or transported on 'hellships', used as slave labour - most notoriously on the Burma-Thailand railway - and how thousands died from tropical diseases. They risked torture or execution to draw and write diaries that they hid wherever they could, sometimes burying them in the graves of lost comrades. The diaries tell of inhumanity and degradation, but there are also inspirational stories of courage, comradeship and compassion. When men have unwillingly plumbed the depths of human misery, said one prisoner, the artist Ronald Searle, they form a silent understanding of what solidarity, friendship and kindness to others can mean. The diaries and interviews with surviving prisoners drawn on in SURVIVING THE SWORD will tell a new generation about that solidarity, friendship and kindness.
Release

You'll Die in Singapore

The True Account of One of the Most Amazing POW Escapes in WWII

Author: Charles McCormac

Publisher: Monsoon Books

ISBN: 9814625388

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 8702

Weakened by hunger, thirst and ill-treatment, author Charles McCormac, then a World War Two prisoner-of-war in Japanese-occupied Singapore, knew that if he did not escape he would die. With sixteen others he broke out of Pasir Panjang camp and began an epic two-thousand-mile escape from the island of Singapore, through the jungles of Indonesia to Australia. With no compass and no map, and only the goodwill of villagers and their own wits to rely on, the British and Australian POWs’ escape took a staggering five months and only two out of the original seventeen men survived. You’ll Die in Singapore is Charles McCormac’s compelling true account of one of the most horrifying and amazing escapes in World War Two. It is a story of courage, endurance and compassion, and makes for a very gripping read.
Release

The Battle for Singapore

The True Story of the Greatest Catastrophe of World War II

Author: Peter Thompson

Publisher: Piatkus

ISBN: 0748122338

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 5017

The true story of the 'the greatest defeat and largest capitulation' in British military history. The Fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942 is a military disaster of enduring fascination. For the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the island, Peter Thompson tells the explosive story of the Malayan campaign, the siege of Singapore, the ignominious surrender to a much smaller Japanese force, and the Japanese occupation through the eyes of those who were there - the soldiers of all nationalities and members of Singapore's beleaguered population. An enthralling and perceptive account, which never loses sight of the human cost of the tragedy - Yorkshire Evening Post. An insightful and dramatic analysis - The Good Book Guide
Release

The Railway Man

Author: Eric Lomax

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0099583844

Category: Burma-Siam Railroad

Page: 322

View: 2526

During the Second World War Eric Lomax was forced to work on the notorious Burma-Siam Railway and was tortured by the Japanese for making a crude radio. Left emotionally scarred and unable to form normal relationships, Lomax suffered for years until, with the help of his wife, Patti Lomax, and of the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture, he came terms with what happened. Fifty years after the terrible events, he was able to meet one of his tormentors. The Railway Man is a story of innocence betrayed, and of survival and courage in the face of horror.
Release

Railway of Hell

A Japanese POW's Account of War, Capture and Forced Labour

Author: Reginald Burton

Publisher: Pen & Sword

ISBN: 9781848842991

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 173

View: 5369

A young captain in the Royal Norfolk Regiment, Reggie Burton was wounded in the closing stages of the disastrous defence of Malaya and Singapore. He vividly, yet calmly and with great dignity, describes the horror of captivity at the hands of the Japanese. After initial confusion, the true nature of their captors emerged as, increasingly debilitated, the POWs were forced into back-breaking work. This was only a taste of what was to come. After a horrific journey in overcrowded cattle trucks, Burton and his dwindling band of colleagues were put to work building the notorious Burma Railway. Somehow he survived to tell this moving and shocking story.
Release

Do the Birds Still Sing in Hell?

Author: Horace Greasley

Publisher: Blake Publishing

ISBN: 9781782196433

Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Page: 314

View: 9371

"He escaped over 200 times from a notorious German prison camp to see the girl he loved. This is the incredible true story of Horace Greasley"--Title page.
Release

The Long Way Home

The Other Great Escape

Author: John McCallum

Publisher: Birlinn

ISBN: 0857902342

Category: History

Page: 164

View: 5673

I couldn't stop turning the pages... a great tale with a deep message' George Robertson 'a thrilling escapade' Bournemouth Echo At the age of nineteen, Glasgow-born John McCallum signed up as a Supplementary Reservist in the Signal Corps. A little over a year later, he was in France, working frantically to set up communication lines as Europe once more hurtled towards war. Wounded and captured at Boulogne, he was sent to the notorious Stalag VIIIB prison camp, together with his brother, Jimmy, and friend Joe Harkin. Ingenious and resourceful, the three men set about planning their escape. With the help of Traudl, a local girl, they put their plan into action. In an astonishing coincidence, they passed through the town of Sagan, around which the seventy-six airmen of the Great Escape were being pursued and caught. However, unlike most of these other escapees, John, Jimmy and Joe eventually made it to freedom. Now, due to the declassification of documents under the Official Secrets Act, John McCallum is finally able to tell the thrilling story of his adventure, in which he recaptures all the danger, audacity and romance of one of the most daring escapes of the Second World War.
Release

Wings, Women, and War

Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat

Author: Reina Pennington

Publisher: Modern War Studies (Paperback)

ISBN: 9780700615544

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8745

The Soviet Union was the first nation to allow women pilots to fly combat missions. This book tells the story of these young, fearless, and patriotic women pilots and their substantial contribution to the Soviet Air Force's success on the Eastern Front.
Release