The Forgiveness of Nature

The Story of Grass

Author: Graham Harvey

Publisher: Random House Uk Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 371

View: 3615

Almost a quarter of the earth's land surface is grassland. Grass feeds us and it brings us joy: to step on grass is temporarily to leave civilisation, to be free.In his brilliant new book, Graham Harvey explores the world of grass from every possible perspective. He explains its role in the history of Britain and America (and indeed of Man himself), elaborates in minute and fascinating detail the botany of a grass field or lawn, talks to the grounds men of Wimbledon and West Ham, explores the ornate history of the lawn-mower and the minutiae of cattle-breeding, surveys the fascinating development of municipal parks. Above all, though, the author of the classic polemic The Killing of the Countryside issues a clarion call for sound husbandry in agriculture, for an end to the destruction of farmland fertility by chemicals, and a return to older, better ways.
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European Plant Intellectual Property

Author: Margaret Llewelyn,Mike Adcock

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1847312721

Category: Law

Page: 578

View: 8232

This authoritative new work analyses European plant intellectual property rights. Whilst the focus of the work is on Europe, and in particular the European Patent Convention, the Council Regulation on Community Plant Variety Rights and the EU Directive on the Legal Protection of Biotechnological Inventions, these provisions are discussed within the context of international legislation, including the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) and the Convention on Biological Diversity. It is the first book to look at the impact of plant intellectual property rights on the European plant breeding industry and assess whether recent developments, such as the Novartis decision, will assist plant breeders, from all sectors of plant breeding activities, in the production of new plant products. In addition to a thorough discussion of the legislation, the book includes unique empirical research results obtained by the authors as part of a two-year research project funded by the European Union, which surveyed attitudes towards, and use of, plant intellectual property rights within the European plant breeding community.
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Where Song Began

Australia's Birds and How They Changed the World

Author: Tim Low

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0857976370

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 1366

Renowned for its unusual mammals, Australia is a land of birds that are just as unusual, just as striking, a result of the continent's tens of millions of years of isolation. Compared with birds elsewhere, ours are more likely to be intelligent, aggressive and loud, to live in complex societies, and are long-lived. They're also ecologically more powerful, exerting more influences on forests than other birds. But unlike the mammals, the birds did not keep to Australia; they spread around the globe. Australia provided the world with its songbirds and parrots, the most intelligent of all bird groups. It was thought in Darwin's time that species generated in the Southern Hemisphere could not succeed in the Northern, an idea that was proven wrong in respect of birds in the 1980s but not properly accepted by the world's scientists until 2004 - because, says Tim Low, most ornithologists live in the Northern Hemisphere. As a result, few Australians are aware of the ramifications, something which prompted the writing of this book. Tim Low has a rare gift for illuminating complex ideas in highly readable prose, and making of the whole a dynamic story. Here he brilliantly explains how our birds came to be so extraordinary, including the large role played by the foods they consume (birds, too, are what they eat), and by our climate, soil, fire, and Australia's legacy as a part of Gondwana. The story of its birds, it turns out, is inseparable from the story of Australia itself, and one that continues to unfold, so much having changed in the last decade about what we know of our ancient past. Where Song Began also shines a light on New Guinea as a biological region of Australia, as much a part of the continent as Tasmania. This is a work that goes far beyond the birds themselves to explore the relationships between Australia's birds and its people, and the ways in which scientific prejudice have hindered our understanding.
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Grasses

Author: Stephen A. Harris

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780233132

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 7465

Most people have memories of playing on well-manicured lawns or running across the flat green surface of a local park, but we often don’t think of grasses as something we consume. Indeed, grasses include four species—wheat, rice, maize, and sugar—that provide sixty percent of human calorie intake, and we become more and more dependent on these as the world’s population increases. In this book, Stephen Harris explains the history of our relationship with these vital plants from the end of the last Ice Age to the present day. Combining biology, sociology, and cultural history, Grasses explores how these staple crops bear the mark of human influence more visibly than any other plant and how we, in turn, are motivated to protect green space such as public parks. Harris describes this symbiotic connection against the background of climate change, contending that humans must find a way to balance their need for grass as food, as living space, and potentially even as fuel. Providing an impressive exploration of the profound impact these plants have on our survival and our pleasure, this well-illustrated book is a must have for gardeners, foodies, and environmentalists.
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Therapist Stories of Inspiration, Passion, and Renewal

What's Love Got to Do with It?

Author: Michael F. Hoyt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415500834

Category: Psychology

Page: 295

View: 4918

Why do you practice psychotherapy? In this exciting volume, some of the field's leading therapists tell true stories which evoke the pleasures, joys, and satisfactions that inspire passion for therapeutic work. Rather than focusing on the stresses and strains of being a clinician, these dramatic, poignant, wise, sometimes humorous and always soulful stories will help you gain (or regain) hope and excitement, and ultimately inspire a recommitment to a profession that, at its heart and soul, is about helping people.
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Sweetgrass - das Herz der Erde

Author: Mary Alice Monroe

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 3955762440

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 5723

Jeden Tag ihrer langen Ehe haben Mary June und Preston Blakely gemeinsam auf "Sweetgrass" in South Carolina verbracht. Aber nicht nur glückliche Stunden waren ihnen hier beschieden, sondern auch tragische Momente und Stunden tiefer Verzweiflung. Als Preston dann einen Schlaganfall erleidet und seine habgierige Schwester versucht, das Anwesen zu ruinieren, droht die Familie an unausgesprochenen Vorwürfen, uneingestandenen Schuldgefühlen und drückenden Geldsorgen zu zerbrechen. Doch in ihrer dunkelsten Stunde blickt Mary June auf ihr Leben mit Preston zurück und erkennt dabei, wofür es sich noch immer zu kämpfen lohnt ...
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The Republic of Nature

An Environmental History of the United States

Author: Mark Fiege

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804149

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 1548

In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/
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Dust Bowl

The Southern Plains in the 1930s

Author: Donald Worster

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199758692

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1423

In the mid 1930s, North America's Great Plains faced one of the worst man-made environmental disasters in world history. Donald Worster's classic chronicle of the devastating years between 1929 and 1939 tells the story of the Dust Bowl in ecological as well as human terms. Now, twenty-five years after his book helped to define the new field of environmental history, Worster shares his more recent thoughts on the subject of the land and how humans interact with it. In a new afterword, he links the Dust Bowl to current political, economic and ecological issues--including the American livestock industry's exploitation of the Great Plains, and the on-going problem of desertification, which has now become a global phenomenon. He reflects on the state of the plains today and the threat of a new dustbowl. He outlines some solutions that have been proposed, such as "the Buffalo Commons," where deer, antelope, bison and elk would once more roam freely, and suggests that we may yet witness a Great Plains where native flora and fauna flourish while applied ecologists show farmers how to raise food on land modeled after the natural prairies that once existed.
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American Edition of the British Encyclopedia

Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ; Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge

Author: William Nicholson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Natural history

Page: N.A

View: 1525

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A Spear of Summer Grass

Author: Deanna Raybourn

Publisher: MIRA

ISBN: 1488032963

Category: Fiction

Page: 376

View: 372

Rediscover the adventure and romance of this evocative historical novel from bestselling author Deanna Raybourn. Paris, 1923. The daughter of a scandalous mother, Delilah Drummond is already notorious. But her latest scandal is big enough to make even her oft-married mother blanch. Delilah is exiled to Kenya and her favorite stepfather’s savanna manor house until gossip subsides. Fairlight is the crumbling, sun-bleached skeleton of a faded African dream, a world where dissolute expats are bolstered by gin and jazz records, cigarettes and safaris. As mistress of this wasted estate, Delilah falls into the decadent pleasures of society. Against the frivolity of her peers, Ryder White stands in sharp contrast. As foreign to Delilah as Africa, Ryder becomes her guide to the complex beauty of this unknown world. Giraffes, buffalo, lions and elephants roam the shores of Lake Wanyama amid swirls of red dust. Here, life is lush and teeming—yet fleeting and often cheap. Amidst the wonders—and dangers—of Africa, Delilah awakes to a land out of all proportion: extremes of heat, darkness, beauty and joy that cut to her very heart. Only when this sacred place is profaned by bloodshed does Delilah discover what is truly worth fighting for—and what she can no longer live without. Originally published in 2013
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Feminist Aesthetics and the Politics of Modernism

Author: Ewa Płonowska Ziarek

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231530900

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 7806

Ewa Ziarek fully articulates a feminist aesthetics, focusing on the struggle for freedom in women's literary and political modernism and the devastating impact of racist violence and sexism. She examines the contradiction between women's transformative literary and political practices and the oppressive realities of racist violence and sexism, and she situates these tensions within the entrenched opposition between revolt and melancholia in studies of modernity and within the friction between material injuries and experimental aesthetic forms. Ziarek's political and aesthetic investigations concern the exclusion and destruction of women in politics and literary production and the transformation of this oppression into the inaugural possibilities of writing and action. Her study is one of the first to combine an in-depth engagement with philosophical aesthetics, especially the work of Theodor W. Adorno, with women's literary modernism, particularly the writing of Virginia Woolf and Nella Larsen, along with feminist theories on the politics of race and gender. By bringing seemingly apolitical, gender-neutral debates about modernism's experimental forms together with an analysis of violence and destroyed materialities, Ziarek challenges both the anti-aesthetic subordination of modern literature to its political uses and the appreciation of art's emancipatory potential at the expense of feminist and anti-racist political struggles.
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The Natural History of the Bible

An Environmental Exploration of the Hebrew Scriptures

Author: Daniel J. Hillel

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231508336

Category: Religion

Page: 376

View: 7809

Traversing river valleys, steppes, deserts, rain-fed forests, farmlands, and seacoasts, the early Israelites experienced all the contrasting ecological domains of the ancient Near East. As they grew from a nomadic clan to become a nation-state in Canaan, they interacted with indigenous societies of the region, absorbed selective elements of their cultures, and integrated them into a radically new culture of their own. Daniel Hillel reveals the interplay between the culture of the Israelites and the environments within which it evolved. More than just affecting their material existence, the region's ecology influenced their views of creation and the creator, their conception of humanity's role on Earth, their own distinctive identity and destiny, and their ethics. In The Natural History of the Bible, Hillel shows how the eclectic experiences of the Israelites shaped their perception of the overarching unity governing nature's varied manifestations. Where other societies idolized disparate and capricious forces of nature, the Israelites discerned essential harmony and higher moral purpose. Inspired by visionary prophets, they looked to a singular, omnipresent, omnipotent force of nature mandating justice and compassion in human affairs. Monotheism was promoted as state policy and centralized in the Temple of Jerusalem. After it was destroyed and the people were exiled, a collection of scrolls distilling the nation's memories and spiritual quest served as the focus of faith in its stead. A prominent environmental scientist who surveyed Israel's land and water resources and has worked on agricultural development projects throughout the region, Daniel Hillel is a uniquely qualified expert on the natural history of the lands of the Bible. Combining his scientific work with a passionate, life-long study of the Bible, Hillel offers new perspectives on biblical views of the environment and the origin of ethical monotheism as an outgrowth of the Israelites' internalized experiences.
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Ein letztes Lied für dich

Author: Natasha Solomons

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644315914

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 5999

Was, wenn die Frau deines Lebens einem anderen gehört? Und dieser andere dein Bruder ist? Grafschaft Dorset, 1946: Der 18-jährige Fox lebt mit seinen Brüdern und seinem Vater auf Hartgrove Hall. Als sein Bruder Jack ihm seine neueste Flamme vorstellt, die bekannte Sängerin Edie, verliebt Fox sich auf den ersten Blick. Doch wenngleich Edie seine Gefühle zu erwidern scheint, wird sie zweifellos Jack heiraten. Hartgrove Hall im Jahr 2000: Fox, mittlerweile über 70-jährig, blickt auf eine erfolgreiche Komponisten-Karriere zurück und lebt allein auf dem großen Gut. Seine geliebte Frau ist kürzlich verstorben, und Fox ist voller Trauer. Er möchte eine letzte Symphonie für sie schreiben, doch in seinem Kopf herrscht Stille. Eine Stille, die er nur brechen kann, wenn er noch einmal zurückblickt. Auf ein Leben, in dem Schmerz und Glück so unerträglich nahe beieinanderlagen.
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