The English Judiciary in the Age of Glanvill and Bracton c.1176-1239

Author: Ralph V. Turner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521072427

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 4841

This book presents a study of the evolution of a professional judiciary in medieval England through the careers of forty-nine royal justices from the last decade of Henry II until 1239. Those years were crucial for the growth of the common law, producing the two legal treatises Glanvill and Bracton. The period also represents a critical phase in the growth of a professional civil service for England. Professor Turner's study plots the shifts from unspecialized multipurpose royal servants to corps of specialists, concentrating on one sphere. By using the method known as prosopography, the author succeeds in bringing vague outlines of the early royal justices into sharper focus. Although they played a major role in the shaping of English common law, little biographical material has been available. This study, by looking at the judges collectively, succeeds in overcoming the scarcity of sources on individuals and presents a composite picture.
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The Formation of the English Common Law

Law and Society in England from King Alfred to Magna Carta

Author: John Hudson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351669974

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 6875

The Formation of English Common Law provides a comprehensive overview of the development of early English law, one of the classic subjects of medieval history. This much expanded second edition spans the centuries from King Alfred to Magna Carta, abandoning the traditional but restrictive break at the Norman Conquest. Within a strong interpretative framework, it also integrates legal developments with wider changes in the thought, society, and politics of the time. Rather than simply tracing elements of the common law back to their Anglo-Saxon, Norman or other origins, John Hudson examines and analyses the emergence of the common law from the interaction of various elements that developed over time, such as the powerful royal government inherited from Anglo-Saxon England and land holding customs arising from the Norman Conquest. Containing a new chapter charting the Anglo-Saxon period, as well as a fully revised Further Reading section, this new edition is an authoritative yet highly accessible introduction to the formation of the English common law and is ideal for students of history and law.
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The Origins of the English Gentry

Author: Peter Coss,Peter R. Coss

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521021005

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 956

A sustained attempt to explore the 13th-14th century origins of the English gentry.
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Law, Governance, and Justice

New Views on Medieval Constitutionalism

Author: Richard Kaeuper,Paul Dingman,Peter Sposato

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004235906

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 2164

How law and governance operated in medieval England - and whether contemporaries saw justice in its operations - have long generated scholarly discussions. 13 scholars, established and younger figures, historians and literary analysts, offer their new views in this volume.
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Order in the Court: Medieval Procedural Treatises in Translation

Author: Bruce Brasington

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004315322

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 9215

In Order in the Court, Brasington translates for the first time selected twelfth-century treatises on procedure in ecclesiastical courts. He also provides an introduction to Roman and canon-law procedure as well as commentary on the works.
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The Irish Jurist

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 400

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The Documentary Imagination

Literature and Bureaucracy in Thirteenth- and Fifteenth-century England

Author: Jim Keegan Hinch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English literature

Page: 454

View: 2114

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Men raised from the dust

administrative service and upward mobility in Angevin England

Author: Ralph V. Turner

Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 1608

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The Reign of Richard Lionheart

Ruler of The Angevin Empire, 1189-1199

Author: Ralph V Turner,Richard Heiser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317890426

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2406

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Magna Carta

Author: Ralph Turner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317873947

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 6555

This new history is the first to tell the story of Magna Carta ‘through the ages’. No other general work traces its continuing importance in England’s political consciousness. Many books have examined the circumstances surrounding King John’s grant of Magna Carta in 1215. Very few trace the Charter’s legacy to subsequent centuries and even fewer look at the fate of the physical document. Turner also underlines its great influence outside the United Kingdom, especially in North America. Today, the Charter enjoys greater prestige in the United States, the land of lawyers, than in Britain. U.S. citizens claim Magna Carta as a source of their liberties, guaranteeing ‘due process of law’ and condemning ‘executive privilege’.
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The Treatise on the Laws and Customs of the Realm of England Commonly Called Glanvill

Author: G. D. G. Hall

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191585181

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 7665

This classic edition of Glanvill, by the great medievalist G.D.G.Hall, has now been reissued by Oxford University Press. The treatise on the laws and customs of the realm of England commonly called Glanvill is undoubtedly one of the best-known and most important works of medieval English law. Its itemization and commentary upon writs and the procedure connected with them provides invaluable information in legal practice in the twelfth century, but the treatise has far more than this to offer. It is a work of original analysis, covering such significant topics as dowry, debt, and inheritance, and allowing us a unique insight into the medieval legal mind.
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Medieval Law and the Foundations of the State

Author: Alan Harding

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019821958X

Category: Law

Page: 392

View: 2785

The state is the most powerful and contested of political ideas, loved for its promise of order but hated for its threat of coercion. In this broad-ranging new study, Alan Harding challenges the orthodoxy that there was no state in the Middle Ages, arguing instead that it was precisely then that the concept acquired its force. He explores how the word 'state' was used by medieval rulers and their ministers and connects the growth of the idea of the state with the development of systemsfor the administration of justice and the enforcement of peace. He shows how these systems provided new models for government from the centre, successfully in France and England but less so in Germany. The courts and legislation of French and English kings are described establishing public order, defining rights to property and liberty, and structuring commonwealths by 'estates'. In the final chapters the author reveals how the concept of the state was taken up by political commentators inthe wars of the later Middle Ages and the Reformation Period, and how the law-based 'state of the king and the kingdom' was transformed into the politically dynamic 'modern state'.
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Eleanor of Aquitaine

Queen of France, Queen of England

Author: Ralph V. Turner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300159897

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 4375

Eleanor of Aquitaine’s extraordinary life seems more likely to be found in the pages of fiction. Proud daughter of a distinguished French dynasty, she married the king of France, Louis VII, then the king of England, Henry II, and gave birth to two sons who rose to take the English throne—Richard the Lionheart and John. Renowned for her beauty, hungry for power, headstrong, and unconventional, Eleanor traveled on crusades, acted as regent for Henry II and later for Richard, incited rebellion, endured a fifteen-year imprisonment, and as an elderly widow still wielded political power with energy and enthusiasm. This gripping biography is the definitive account of the most important queen of the Middle Ages. Ralph Turner, a leading historian of the twelfth century, strips away the myths that have accumulated around Eleanor—the “black legend” of her sexual appetite, for example—and challenges the accounts that relegate her to the shadows of the kings she married and bore. Turner focuses on a wealth of primary sources, including a collection of Eleanor’s own documents not previously accessible to scholars, and portrays a woman who sought control of her own destiny in the face of forceful resistance. A queen of unparalleled appeal, Eleanor of Aquitaine retains her power to fascinate even 800 years after her death.
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The Penguin History of Britain: The Struggle for Mastery

Britain 1066-1284

Author: David Carpenter

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141935146

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 9347

The two-and-a-half centuries after 1066 were momentous ones in the history of Britain. In 1066, England was conquered for the last time. The Anglo-Saxon ruling class was destroyed and and the English became a subject race, dominated by a Norman-French dynasty and aristocracy. This book shows how the English domination of the kingdom was by no means a foregone conclusion. The struggle for mastery in the book's title is in reality the struggle for different masteries within Great Britain. The book weaves together the histories of England, Scotland and Wales in a new way and argues that all three, in their different fashions, were competing for domination
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Handbook of British Chronology

Author: E. B. Pryde,D. E. Greenway

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521563505

Category: History

Page: 605

View: 5585

The authoritative and indispensable record of all holders of major offices in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.
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The Worlds of Medieval Europe

Author: Clifford R. Backman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199372294

Category: History

Page: 645

View: 9167

Deftly written and beautifully illustrated, The Worlds of Medieval Europe, Third Edition, presents a distinctive and nuanced portrayal of the Greater West during its medieval millennium. By integrating the histories of the Islamic and Byzantine worlds into the main narrative, author Clifford R. Backman offers an insightful, detailed, and often witty look at the continuum of interaction--social, cultural, intellectual, and commercial--that existed among all three societies. This compelling volume surpasses traditional textbook representations of the Middle Ages by balancing the conventional focus on political affairs, especially those of northern Europe, with equally detailed attention to medieval society as it developed in the Mediterranean. In addition, Backman describes the ways in which the medieval Latin West attempted to understand the unified and rational structure of the human cosmos, which they believed existed beneath the observable diversity and disorder of the world. This effort to recreate a human ordering of "unity through diversity" provides an essential key to understanding medieval Europe and the ways in which it regarded and reacted to the worlds around it.
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The Image of Aristocracy

In Britain, 1000-1300

Author: David Crouch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113497793X

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 1437

David Crouch provides a broad definition of aristorcracy by examining the ways aristocrats behaved and lived between 1000 and 1300. He analyses life-style, class and luxurious living in those years. A distinctive feature of the book is that it takes a British, rather than Anglocentric, view - looking at the penetration of Welsh and Scottish society by Anglo-French ideas of aristocracy.
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