African Images

Racism and the End of Anthropology

Author: Peter Rigby

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9781859731963

Category: Social Science

Page: 156

View: 6273

This controversial book is an impassioned African response to the racial stereotyping of African people and people of African descent by prominent white scholars. It highlights how the media contributes to the growth of racist ideas, particularly in reporting current events in Africa, and demonstrates how some of America's most revered intellectuals cloak racist ideologies in ostensibly egalitarian discourses. The author seeks to rewrite the image of 'race' in order to show the damage racism can cause serious scholarship.
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The End of Anthropology?

Author: Karl-Heinz Kohl

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781907774287

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 3020

Decolonisation, modernisation, globalisation, the crisis of representation, and the 'cultural turn' in neighbouring disciplines have unsettled anthropology to such an extent that the field's foundations, the subjects of its study as well as its methods and concepts, appear to be eroded. It is now time to take stock and either abandon anthropology as a fundamentally untenable or superfluous project, or to set it on more solid foundations. In this volume some of the world's leading anthropologists - including Vincent Crapanzano, Maurice Godelier, Ulf Hannerz and Adam Kuper - do just that. Reflecting on how to meet the manifold institutional, theoretical, methodological, and epistemological challenges to the field, as well as on the continued, if not heightened, importance of anthropology in a world where diversity and cultural difference are becoming ever more important economically, politically, and legally, they set upon the task of reconstructing anthropology's foundations and firming up its stance vis-a-vis these challenges. 'With a backward glance at earlier predictions of the demise of anthropology, the essays present a confident account of the future of the discipline. Defining in clear terms what it is that anthropologists do, a well-chosen group of distinguished contributors confront the diversity and internal distinctions that characterize the field, weigh the seriousness of the trend toward interdisciplinary studies in the human sciences, and redefine the strengths of the anthropological mode of knowledge production'. (Shirley Lindenbaum, Professor Emerita, City University of New York)
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Human No More

Digital Subjectivities, Unhuman Subjects, and the End of Anthropology

Author: Neil L. Whitehead,Michael Wesch

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 160732170X

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 3716

Turning an anthropological eye toward cyberspace, Human No More explores how conditions of the online world shape identity, place, culture, and death within virtual communities. Online worlds have recently thrown into question the traditional anthropological conception of place-based ethnography. They break definitions, blur distinctions, and force us to rethink the notion of the "subject." Human No More asks how digital cultures can be integrated and how the ethnography of both the "unhuman" and the "digital" could lead to possible reconfiguring the notion of the "human." This provocative and groundbreaking work challenges fundamental assumptions about the entire field of anthropology. Cross-disciplinary research from well-respected contributors makes this volume vital to the understanding of contemporary human interaction. It will be of interest not only to anthropologists but also to students and scholars of media, communication, popular culture, identity, and technology.
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Anthropology's Wake

Attending to the End of Culture

Author: Scott J. Michaelsen,David E. Johnson

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823228789

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 6854

Posing a powerful challenge to dominant trends in cultural analysis, this book covers the whole history of the concept of culture, providing the broadest study of this notion to date. Johnson and Michaelsen examine the principal methodological strategies or metaphors of anthropology in the past two decades (embodied in works by Edward Said, James Clifford, George Marcus, V. Y. Mudimbe, and others) and argues that they do not manage to escape anthropology's grounding in representational practices. To the extent that it remains a practice of representation, anthropology, however complex, critical, or self-reflexive, cannot avoid objectifying its others. Extending beyond a critique of anthropology, the book reads the twinned notions of the human and culture across the long history of the human sciences broadly conceived, including anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, and philosophy. Although there is no chance, they argue, for a "new" anthropology that would not repeat the old anthropology's problem of disciplining the other, they also recognize that there may be no way out of anthropology. We are always writing, thinking, and living in anthropology's wake, within its specific compass or horizon. Moreover, they demonstrate, we have been doing so for a very long time, since at least the beginning of the institution of philosophy in Plato and Aristotle.
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Death of the Father

An Anthropology of the End in Political Authority

Author: John Borneman

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571811110

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 7350

'Death of the Father' is a comparative examination of the crises in symbolic identification and national traumas that have resulted from the defeat and/or implosion of regimes in Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan and Communist Eastern Europe.
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The Routledge Dictionary of Anthropologists

Author: Gérald Gaillard

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415228251

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 2749

This detailed and comprehensive guide provides biographical information on the most influential and significant figures in world anthropology, from the birth of the discipline in the nineteenth century to the present day. Each of the fifteen chapters focuses on a national tradition or school of thought, outlining its central features and placing the anthropologists within their intellectual contexts. Fully indexed and cross-referenced, The Routledge Dictionary of Anthropologists will prove indispensable for students of anthropology.
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Indians and Anthropologists

Vine Deloria, Jr., and the Critique of Anthropology

Author: Thomas Biolsi,Larry J. Zimmerman

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816516070

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 852

In 1969 Vine Deloria, Jr., in his controversial book Custer Died for Your Sins, criticized the anthropological community for its impersonal dissection of living Native American cultures. Twenty-five years later, anthropologists have become more sensitive to Native American concerns, and Indian people have become more active in fighting for accurate representations of their cultures. In this collection of essays, Indian and non-Indian scholars examine how the relationship between anthropology and Indians has changed over that quarter-century and show how controversial this issue remains. Practitioners of cultural anthropology, archaeology, education, and history provide multiple lenses through which to view how Deloria's message has been interpreted or misinterpreted. Among the contributions are comments on Deloria's criticisms, thoughts on the reburial issue, and views on the ethnographic study of specific peoples. A final contribution by Deloria himself puts the issue of anthropologist/Indian interaction in the context of the century's end. CONTENTS Introduction: What's Changed, What Hasn't, Thomas Biolsi & Larry J. Zimmerman Part One--Deloria Writes Back Vine Deloria, Jr., in American Historiography, Herbert T. Hoover Growing Up on Deloria: The Impact of His Work on a New Generation of Anthropologists, Elizabeth S. Grobsmith Educating an Anthro: The Influence of Vine Deloria, Jr., Murray L. Wax Part Two--Archaeology and American Indians Why Have Archaeologists Thought That the Real Indians Were Dead and What Can We Do about It?, Randall H. McGuire Anthropology and Responses to the Reburial Issue, Larry J. Zimmerman Part Three-Ethnography and Colonialism Here Come the Anthros, Cecil King Beyond Ethics: Science, Friendship and Privacy, Marilyn Bentz The Anthropological Construction of Indians: Haviland Scudder Mekeel and the Search for the Primitive in Lakota Country, Thomas Biolsi Informant as Critic: Conducting Research on a Dispute between Iroquoianist Scholars and Traditional Iroquois, Gail Landsman The End of Anthropology (at Hopi)?, Peter Whiteley Conclusion: Anthros, Indians and Planetary Reality, Vine Deloria, Jr.
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The Politics of Anthropology

From Colonialism and Sexism Toward a View from Below

Author: Gerrit Huizer,Bruce Mannheim

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110806452

Category: Philosophy

Page: 532

View: 5961

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The End of the Soul

Scientific Modernity, Atheism, and Anthropology in France

Author: Jennifer Hecht

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231502389

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 9231

On October 19, 1876 a group of leading French citizens, both men and women included, joined together to form an unusual group, The Society of Mutual Autopsy, with the aim of proving that souls do not exist. The idea was that, after death, they would dissect one another and (hopefully) show a direct relationship between brain shapes and sizes and the character, abilities and intelligence of individuals. This strange scientific pact, and indeed what we have come to think of as anthropology, which the group's members helped to develop, had its genesis in aggressive, evangelical atheism. With this group as its focus, The End of the Soul is a study of science and atheism in France in late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It shows that anthropology grew in the context of an impassioned struggle between the forces of tradition, especially the Catholic faith, and those of a more freethinking modernism, and moreover that it became for many a secular religion. Among the adherents of this new faith discussed here are the novelist Emile Zola, the great statesman Leon Gambetta, the American birth control advocate Margaret Sanger, and Arthur Conan Doyle, whose Sherlock Holmes embodied the triumph of ratiocination over credulity. Boldly argued, full of colorful characters and often bizarre battles over science and faith, this book represents a major contribution to the history of science and European intellectual history.
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The Ends of the World

Author: Déborah Danowski,Eduardo Viveiros de Castro

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509503994

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 2681

The end of the world is a seemingly interminable topic Ð at least, of course, until it happens. Environmental catastrophe and planetary apocalypse are subjects of enduring fascination and, as ethnographic studies show, human cultures have approached them in very different ways. Indeed, in the face of the growing perception of the dire effects of global warming, some of these visions have been given a new lease on life. Information and analyses concerning the human causes and the catastrophic consequences of the planetary ‘crisis’ have been accumulating at an ever-increasing rate, mobilising popular opinion as well as academic reflection. In this book, philosopher Déborah Danowski and anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro offer a bold overview and interpretation of these current discourses on ‘the end of the world’, reading them as thought experiments on the decline of the West’s anthropological adventure Ð that is, as attempts, though not necessarily intentional ones, at inventing a mythology that is adequate to the present. This work has important implications for the future development of ecological practices and it will appeal to a broad audience interested in contemporary anthropology, philosophy, and environmentalism.
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The Saga of Anthropology in China

From Malinowski to Moscow to Mao

Author: Gregory Eliyu Guldin

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 9780765640253

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7787

The Saga of Anthropology in China traces the development of and turmoil surrounding the discipline of anthropology during the tumultuous events of twentieth-century Chinese history. Narrating the growth of anthropology and its allied sciences, this book provides the reader with insights into the construction of national academic structures and the all too frequent reliance of Third World nations on foreign models and money. Against this sweeping historical background the author humanizes the saga by pausing repeatedly to consider the effect national and international trends had on the life and care of a single scholar, Liang Zhaotao of Zhongshan University. His is a story of relevance for all who are concerned not only with China or anthropology, but with the development of independent structures of knowledge outside the great intellectual centers of the West.
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The End of Tradition?

Author: Nezar AlSayyad,Professor and Chair Center for Middle Eastern Studies Nezar Alsayyad

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415290401

Category: Architecture

Page: 266

View: 9963

Rooted in real-world observations, this book questions the concept of tradition. In his introduction, Nezar AlSayyad discusses the meanings of the word 'tradition' and the current debates about the 'end of tradition'. Thereafter the book is divided into three parts.
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American Anthropology, 1921-1945

Papers from the American Anthropologist

Author: George W. Stocking

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803206410

Category: Social Science

Page: 543

View: 5936

From the 1920s through the end of World War II, American anthropology grew in complexityøwhile its scope became increasingly global and contemporary. Much insightful and innovative work continued to be produced by scholars working with Native American and First Nation communities, but the significant contributions of those conducting research abroad soon became hard to ignore. The nature of culture and acculturation were scrutinized and theorized about repeatedly; the relationship between culture and personality became an important subject of inquiry; particular historical reconstructions were joined by more synchronic studies of cultures; and more anthropologists gave attention to current events and to unraveling the intricacies of modern culture. The discipline as a whole moved away from affiliations with museums and instead cast itself as a social science within the academy; at the same time, government sponsorship of anthropological research increased markedly through New Deal initiatives and wartime programs of the 1940s. The thirty-nine selections in this volume represent the increasingly diverse areas of research and range of lasting accomplishments in American anthropology during the interwar period. Introducing these essays is a historical overview of American anthropology during this era by George W. Stocking Jr.
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Debating the End of Yugoslavia

Author: Florian Bieber,Armina Galijaš

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131715424X

Category: Political Science

Page: 276

View: 7455

Countries rarely disappear off the map. In the 20th century, only a few countries shared this fate with Yugoslavia. The dissolution of Yugoslavia led to the largest war in Europe since 1945, massive human rights violations and over 100,000 victims. Debating the End of Yugoslavia is less an attempt to re-write the dissolution of Yugoslavia, or to provide a different narrative, than to take stock and reflect on the scholarship to date. New sources and data offer fresh avenues of research avoiding the passion of the moment that often characterized research published during the wars and provide contemporary perspectives on the dissolution. The book outlines the state of the debate rather than focusing on controversies alone and maps how different scholarly communities have reflected on the dissolution of the country, what arguments remain open in scholarly discourse and highlights new, innovative paths to study the period.
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History's Shadow

Native Americans and Historical Consciousness in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Steven Conn

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226114958

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6146

Answers thought-provoking questions about who Native Americans were, where they came from, and how long ago, and explains how such issues have forced Americans to confront not only the meaning of the history of Native Americans, but of their own history as well.
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The future of anthropology

its relevance to the contemporary world

Author: Akbar S. Ahmed,Cris Shore

Publisher: Athlone Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 291

View: 3364

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Changing Fields of Anthropology

From Local to Global

Author: Michael Kearney

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847693733

Category: Social Science

Page: 365

View: 9861

This book explores major shifts and reorientations in the recent history of American Anthropology, reflecting the author's vision of what anthropology is and what it has the potential to become. The book engages three fundamental intellectual-political challenges that American anthropology is destined to confront (or at its peril, avoid): becoming more self-reflexive, achieving theoretical and methodological holism, and defense of universal human rights.
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A Cautious Silence

The Politics of Australian Anthropology

Author: Geoffrey G. Gray

Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press

ISBN: 9780855755515

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 2279

The first exploration of modern Australian social anthropology, this study examines the forces that helped shaped its formation and reveals the struggles to establish and consolidate anthropology in Australia as an academic discipline. Once demonstrating that their discipline was the predominant interpreter of Indigenous life, anthropologists have assisted government in the control, development, and advancement of Indigenous peoples.
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