The Decline and Fall of the Habsburg Empire, 1815-1918

Author: Alan Sked

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317880048

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 5423

A new and revised edition of Alan Sked’s groundbreaking book which examines how the Habsburg Empire survived the revolutionary turmoil of 1848. ‘The Year of Revolutions', saw the whole of Europe convulsed in turmoil and revolt. Yet the Habsburg Empire survived. As state after state succumbed to the violent winds of change that were sweeping the continent. How did the Habsburg Empire survive? How was the army able hold together while the rest of the empire collapsed in civil war, and how was it able to seize the political initiative In this new edition, Alan Sked reflects on the changed understanding of the period which resulted from the first appearance of this book, and widens the discussion to look at the Habsburg Empire alongside the decline of the Russian and German Empires, arguing that it is possible to understand their decline from a broad European perspective, as opposed to the overly narrow focus of recent explanations. Alan Sked makes us look at familiar events with new eyes in this radical, vigorously written classic which is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of nineteenth-century Europe.
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The Decline and Fall of the Habsburg Empire, 1815-1918

Author: Alan Sked

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131788003X

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 6959

A new and revised edition of Alan Sked’s groundbreaking book which examines how the Habsburg Empire survived the revolutionary turmoil of 1848. ‘The Year of Revolutions', saw the whole of Europe convulsed in turmoil and revolt. Yet the Habsburg Empire survived. As state after state succumbed to the violent winds of change that were sweeping the continent. How did the Habsburg Empire survive? How was the army able hold together while the rest of the empire collapsed in civil war, and how was it able to seize the political initiative In this new edition, Alan Sked reflects on the changed understanding of the period which resulted from the first appearance of this book, and widens the discussion to look at the Habsburg Empire alongside the decline of the Russian and German Empires, arguing that it is possible to understand their decline from a broad European perspective, as opposed to the overly narrow focus of recent explanations. Alan Sked makes us look at familiar events with new eyes in this radical, vigorously written classic which is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of nineteenth-century Europe.
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The Decline and Fall of the Habsburg Empire, 1815-1918

Author: Alan Sked

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781138152595

Category:

Page: 364

View: 3687

A new and revised edition of Alan Sked's groundbreaking book which examines how the Habsburg Empire survived the revolutionary turmoil of 1848. 'The Year of Revolutions', saw the whole of Europe convulsed in turmoil and revolt. Yet the Habsburg Empire survived. As state after state succumbed to the violent winds of change that were sweeping the continent. How did the Habsburg Empire survive? How was the army able hold together while the rest of the empire collapsed in civil war, and how was it able to seize the political initiative In this new edition, Alan Sked reflects on the changed understanding of the period which resulted from the first appearance of this book, and widens the discussion to look at the Habsburg Empire alongside the decline of the Russian and German Empires, arguing that it is possible to understand their decline from a broad European perspective, as opposed to the overly narrow focus of recent explanations. Alan Sked makes us look at familiar events with new eyes in this radical, vigorously written classic which is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of nineteenth-century Europe.
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Radetzky

Imperial Victor and Military Genius

Author: Alan Sked

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1848856776

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 262

View: 2663

Later in Radetzky's career, in 1848 and again in 1849, it was he who defeated a much superior army - not merely to maintain the political and geographical integrity of the Habsburg Monarchy but thereby almost certainly preventing a whole continent from dissolving once again into war and revolution as it had in 1792-1815. --
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Dynasty and Piety

Archduke Albert (1598-1621) and Habsburg Political Culture in an Age of Religious Wars

Author: Luc Duerloo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317147278

Category: History

Page: 610

View: 4892

The youngest son of Emperor Maximilian II, and nephew of Philip II of Spain, Archduke Albert (1559-1621) was originally destined for the church. However, dynastic imperatives decided otherwise and in 1598, upon his marriage to Philip's daughter, the Infanta Isabella Clara Eugenia, he found himself ruler of the Habsburg Netherlands, one of the most dynamic yet politically unstable territories in early-modern Europe. Through an investigation of Albert's reign, this book offers a new and fuller understanding of international events of the time, and the Habsburg role in them. Drawing on a wide range of archival and visual material, the resulting study of Habsburg political culture demonstrates the large degree of autonomy enjoyed by the archducal regime, which allowed Albert and his entourage to exert a decisive influence on several crucial events: preparing the ground for the Anglo-Spanish peace of 1604 by the immediate recognition of King James, clearing the way for the Twelve Years' Truce by conditionally accepting the independence of the United Provinces, reasserting Habsburg influence in the Rhineland by the armed intervention of 1614 and devising the terms of the Oñate Treaty of 1617. In doing so the book shows how they sought to initiate a realistic policy of consolidation benefiting the Spanish Monarchy and the House of Habsburg. Whilst previous work on the subject has tended to concentrate on either the relationship between Spain and the Netherlands or between Spain and the Empire, this book offers a far deeper and much more nuanced insight in how the House of Habsburg functioned as a dynasty during these critical years of increasing religious tensions. Based on extensive research in the archives left by the archducal regime and its diplomatic partners or rivals, it bridges the gap between the reigns of Philip II and Philip IV and puts research into the period onto a fascinating new basis.
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The Rise And Fall of British Naval Mastery

Author: Paul Kennedy

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141983833

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 1823

Paul Kennedy's classic naval history, now updated with a new introduction by the author This acclaimed book traces Britain's rise and fall as a sea power from the Tudors to the present day. Challenging the traditional view that the British are natural 'sons of the waves', he suggests instead that the country's fortunes as a significant maritime force have always been bound up with its economic growth. In doing so, he contributes significantly to the centuries-long debate between 'continental' and 'maritime' schools of strategy over Britain's policy in times of war. Setting British naval history within a framework of national, international, economic, political and strategic considerations, he offers a fresh approach to one of the central questions in British history. A new introduction extends his analysis into the twenty-first century and reflects on current American and Chinese ambitions for naval mastery. 'Excellent and stimulating' Correlli Barnett 'The first scholar to have set the sweep of British Naval history against the background of economic history' Michael Howard, Sunday Times 'By far the best study that has ever been done on the subject ... a sparkling and apt quotation on practically every page' Daniel A. Baugh, International History Review 'The best single-volume study of Britain and her naval past now available to us' Jon Sumida, Journal of Modern History
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The Army of Francis Joseph

Author: Gunther E. Rothenberg

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 9781557531452

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 339

Rothenberg's work offers the first analytical, full length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815 to 1918.
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Militarism and the Indo-Europeanizing of Europe

Author: Robert Drews

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351982427

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 9860

This book argues that the Indo-Europeanizing of Europe essentially began shortly before 1600 BC, when lands rich in natural resources were taken over by military forces from the Eurasian steppe and from southern Caucasia. First were the copper and silver mines (along with good harbors) in Greece, and the copper and gold mines of the Carpathian basin. By ca. 1500 BC other military men had taken over the amber coasts of Scandinavia and the metalworking district of the southern Alps. These military takeovers offer the most likely explanations for the origins of the Greek, Keltic, Germanic and Italic subgroups of the Indo-European language family. Battlefield warfare and militarism, Robert Drews contends, were novelties ca. 1600 BC and were a consequence of the military employment of chariots. Current opinion is that militarism and battlefield warfare are as old as formal states, going back before 3000 BC. Another current opinion is that the Indo-Europeanizing of Europe happened long before 1600 BC. The "Kurgan theory" of Marija Gimbutas and David Anthony dates it from late in the fifth to early in the third millennium BC and explains it as the result of horse-riding conquerors or raiders coming to Europe from the steppe. Colin Renfrew’s Archaeology and Language dates the Indo-Europeanizing of Europe to the seventh and sixth millennia BC, and explains it as a consequence of the spread of agriculture in a "wave of advance" from Anatolia through Europe. Pairing linguistic with archaeological evidence Drews concludes that in Greece and Italy, at least, no Indo-European language could have arrived before the second millennium BC.
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The Habsburg Monarchy, C. 1765-1918

From Enlightenment to Eclipse

Author: Robin Okey

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780333396544

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 8066

The Habsburg Monarchy thoroughly explores the dynastic characters and the multi-national complexity of the region as well as the way the Monarchy dealt with issues within the European framework, like the ending of Absolutism and education. The book spans from Joseph II’s accession as Holy Roman Emperor and joint ruler of the Habsburg lands with his Mother Maria Theresa in 1765 to its fall in 1918. Utilizing English, German, Serbo-Croat, Czech, and Magyar sources, as well as others, this book is the most comprehensive history of the Habsburg Empire ever written.
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The Last Years of Austria-Hungary

A Multi-national Experiment in Early Twentieth-century Europe

Author: Mark Cornwall

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 2367

The Habsburg Empire was an experiment in multi-national politics. The eight essays in this volume seek to unravel the complexities of the final twenty years of Austria-Hungary and its eventual disintegration,.
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Talks with T.G. Masaryk

Author: Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk,Karel Čapek,Michael Henry Heim

Publisher: Catbird Press

ISBN: 9780945774266

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 254

View: 5227

Translated by Dora Round Tomas Garrigue Masaryk (1850-1937) was a philosophy professor who became the founder and first president of Czechoslovakia (1918-1935) and was a leading figure in world affairs between the wars. Capek, author of 'War with the Newts', and Czechoslovakia's most prominent writer during these years, interviewed Masaryk at great length and produced this volume that tells Masaryk's unique story.
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Mapping Europe's Borderlands

Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire

Author: Steven Seegel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226744256

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7412

The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction. Maps shape and communicate information, for the sake of improved orientation. But maps exist for states as well as individuals, and they need to be interpreted as expressions of power and knowledge, as Steven Seegel makes clear in his impressive and important new book. Mapping Europe’s Borderlands takes the familiar problems of state and nation building in eastern Europe and presents them through an entirely new prism, that of cartography and cartographers. Drawing from sources in eleven languages, including military, historical-pedagogical, and ethnographic maps, as well as geographic texts and related cartographic literature, Seegel explores the role of maps and mapmakers in the East Central European borderlands from the Enlightenment to the Treaty of Versailles. For example, Seegel explains how Russia used cartography in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars and, later, formed its geography society as a cover for gathering intelligence. He also explains the importance of maps to the formation of identities and institutions in Poland, Ukraine, and Lithuania, as well as in Russia. Seegel concludes with a consideration of the impact of cartographers’ regional and socioeconomic backgrounds, educations, families, career options, and available language choices.
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Post-war Britain

a political history

Author: Alan Sked,Chris Cook

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 478

View: 7815

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The Habsburg Monarchy's Many-Languaged Soul

Translating and interpreting, 1848–1918

Author: Michaela Wolf

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9027268681

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 289

View: 855

In the years between 1848 and 1918, the Habsburg Empire was an intensely pluricultural space that brought together numerous “nationalities” under constantly changing – and contested – linguistic regimes. The multifaceted forms of translation and interpreting, marked by national struggles and extensive multilingualism, played a crucial role in constructing cultures within the Habsburg space. This book traces translation and interpreting practices in the Empire’s administration, courts and diplomatic service, and takes account of the “habitualized” translation carried out in everyday life. It then details the flows of translation among the Habsburg crownlands and between these and other European languages, with a special focus on Italian–German exchange. Applying a broad concept of “cultural translation” and working with sociological tools, the book addresses the mechanisms by which translation and interpreting constructs cultures, and delineates a model of the Habsburg Monarchy’s “pluricultural space of communication” that is also applicable to other multilingual settings. Published with the support of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF)img src="/logos/fwf-logo.jpg" width=300
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Gambling on War

Confidence, Fear, and the Tragedy of the First World War

Author: Roger L. Ransom

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108608175

Category: Business & Economics

Page: N.A

View: 5583

The First World War left a legacy of chaos that is still with us a century later. Why did European leaders resort to war and why did they not end it sooner? Roger L. Ransom sheds new light on this enduring puzzle by employing insights from prospect theory and notions of risk and uncertainty. He reveals how the interplay of confidence, fear, and a propensity to gamble encouraged aggressive behavior by leaders who pursued risky military strategies in hopes of winning the war. The result was a series of military disasters and a war of attrition which gradually exhausted the belligerents without producing any hope of ending the war. Ultimately, he shows that the outcome of the war rested as much on the ability of the Allied powers to muster their superior economic resources to continue the fight as it did on success on the battlefield.
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The Habsburg Monarchy, 1809-1918

A History of the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary

Author: A. J. P. Taylor

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226791456

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 5024

First published in 1941, The Habsburg Monarchy has become indispensable to students of nineteenth-century European history. Not only a chronological report of actions and changes, Taylor's work is a provocative exploration into the historical process of the most eventful hundred years of the Habsburg monarchy.
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Post-Imperium

A Eurasian Story

Author: Dmitri V. Trenin

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 087003345X

Category: Political Science

Page: 279

View: 4203

The war in Georgia. Tensions with Ukraine and other nearby countries. Moscow's bid to consolidate its "zone of privileged interests" among the Commonwealth of Independent States. These volatile situations all raise questions about the nature of and prospects for Russia's relations with its neighbors. In this book, Carnegie scholar Dmitri Trenin argues that Moscow needs to drop the notion of creating an exclusive power center out of the post-Soviet space. Like other former European empires, Russia will need to reinvent itself as a global player and as part of a wider community. Trenin's vision of Russia is an open Euro-Pacific country that is savvy in its use of soft power and fully reconciled with its former borderlands and dependents. He acknowledges that this scenario may sound too optimistic but warns that the alternative is not a new version of the historic empire but instead is the ultimate marginalization of Russia.
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The Habsburg Empire

From Dynasticism to Multinationalism

Author: Paula S. Fichtner

Publisher: Krieger Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780894648960

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 7397

Dr. Fichtner presents a concise summary of the development and problems of the Habsburg Empire as a multiethnic state from the sixteenth century to the end of World War I. Twenty-six documents, some from local journals and periodicals of the era, illustrate the political, cultural, and economic relations of the Habsburg peoples, both with their rulers and with one another.
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The Sleepwalkers

How Europe Went to War in 1914

Author: Christopher Clark

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062199226

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 8641

One of The New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of the Year Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 is historian Christopher Clark’s riveting account of the explosive beginnings of World War I. Drawing on new scholarship, Clark offers a fresh look at World War I, focusing not on the battles and atrocities of the war itself, but on the complex events and relationships that led a group of well-meaning leaders into brutal conflict. Clark traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute, action-packed narrative that cuts between the key decision centers in Vienna, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Paris, London, and Belgrade, and examines the decades of history that informed the events of 1914 and details the mutual misunderstandings and unintended signals that drove the crisis forward in a few short weeks. Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Christopher Clark’s The Sleepwalkers is a dramatic and authoritative chronicle of Europe’s descent into a war that tore the world apart.
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