The class ceiling

Why it pays to be privileged

Author: Friedman, Sam,Laurison, Daniel

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 9781447336068

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3291

Politicians continually tell us that anyone can get ahead. But is that really true? This important book takes readers behind the closed doors of elite employers to reveal how class affects who gets to the top. Friedman and Laurison show that a powerful ‘class pay gap’ exists in Britain’s elite occupations. Even when those from working-class backgrounds make it into prestigious jobs, they earn, on average, 16% less than colleagues from privileged backgrounds. But why is this the case? . Drawing on 200 interviews across four case studies - television, accountancy, architecture, and acting – they explore the complex barriers facing the upwardly mobile. This is a rich, ambitious book that demands we take seriously not just the glass but also the class ceiling.
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The Highest Glass Ceiling

Women's Quest for the American Presidency

Author: Ellen Fitzpatrick

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674496078

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 7537

Best-selling historian Ellen Fitzpatrick tells the story of three remarkable women who set their sights on the Presidency. The arduous, dramatic quests of Victoria Woodhull (1872), Margaret Chase Smith (1964), and Shirley Chisholm (1972) illuminate today’s political landscape, shedding light on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign for the Oval Office.
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The Racial Glass Ceiling

Subordination in American Law and Culture

Author: Roy L. Brooks

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300223307

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 4066

A compelling study of a subtle and insidious form of racial inequality in American law and culture. Why does racial equality continue to elude African Americans even after the election of a black president? Liberals blame white racism while conservatives blame black behavior. Both define the race problem in socioeconomic terms, mainly citing jobs, education, and policing. Roy Brooks, a distinguished legal scholar, argues that the reality is more complex. He defines the race problem African Americans face today as a three-headed hydra involving socioeconomic, judicial, and cultural conditions. Focusing on law and culture, Brooks defines the problem largely as racial subordination--"the act of impeding racial progress in pursuit of nonracist interests." Racial subordination is little understood and underacknowledged, yet it produces devastating and even deadly racial consequences that affect both poor and socioeconomically successful African Americans. Brooks addresses a serious problem, in many ways more dangerous than overt racism, and offers a well-reasoned solution that draws upon the strongest virtues America has exhibited to the world.
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Breaking the class ceiling

paraeducator pathways to teaching

Author: David Haselkorn,Elizabeth F. Fideler,Recruiting New Teachers, Inc

Publisher: Recruiting New Teachers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 296

View: 1735

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Cracking the Highest Glass Ceiling

A Global Comparison of Women's Campaigns for Executive Office

Author: Rainbow Murray

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313382484

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 267

View: 2230

This examination of the role of gender stereotyping in media coverage of executive elections uses nine case studies from around the world to provide a unique comparative perspective. * Essays by 13 distinguished scholars combining research on gender and elections with expertise in a particular country * A table highlighting key findings for each case study, facilitating comparison in a way that has not previously been possible * A bibliography that brings together readings on gender, elections, and media stereotyping from the United States and eight other countries around the world
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Notes from the Cracked Ceiling

Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and what it Will Take for a Woman to Win

Author: Anne E. Kornblut

Publisher: Crown Pub

ISBN: 0307464253

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 3487

Looks at the obstacles faced by women who aspire to run for president, looks at the mistakes made by women candidates in their quest for the presidency, and offers strategies to help them succeed.
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Breaking the Glass Ceiling

Racism & Sexism in Corporate America : the Myths, the Realities, and the Solutions

Author: Anthony Stith

Publisher: Bryant & Dillon Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 197

View: 2364

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The Cash Ceiling

Why Only the Rich Run for Office--and What We Can Do about It

Author: Nicholas Carnes

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691184208

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 8048

Why working-class Americans almost never become politicians, what that means for democracy, and what reformers can do about it Why are Americans governed by the rich? Millionaires make up only three percent of the public but control all three branches of the federal government. How did this happen? What stops lower-income and working-class Americans from becoming politicians? The first book to answer these urgent questions, The Cash Ceiling provides a compelling and comprehensive account of why so few working-class people hold office—and what reformers can do about it. Using extensive data on candidates, politicians, party leaders, and voters, Nicholas Carnes debunks popular misconceptions (like the idea that workers are unelectable or unqualified to govern), identifies the factors that keep lower-class Americans off the ballot and out of political institutions, and evaluates a variety of reform proposals. In the United States, Carnes shows, elections have a built-in “cash ceiling,” a series of structural barriers that make it almost impossible for the working-class to run for public office. Elections take a serious toll on candidates, many working-class Americans simply can’t shoulder the practical burdens, and civic and political leaders often pass them over in favor of white-collar candidates. But these obstacles aren’t inevitable. Pilot programs to recruit, train, and support working-class candidates have the potential to increase the economic diversity of our governing institutions and ultimately amplify the voices of ordinary citizens. Who runs for office goes to the heart of whether we will have a democracy that is representative or not. The Cash Ceiling shows that the best hope for combating the oversized political influence of the rich might simply be to help more working-class Americans become politicians.
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Breaking the Glass Ceiling

The Stories of Three Caribbean Nurses

Author: Jocelyn Hezekiah

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1466958871

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 244

View: 5156

Breaking the Glass Ceiling documents the achievements of three leaders in Caribbean nurshing at the time of the nascent struggle for indigenous leadership in all areas of West Indian society. It is a narrative of the lives of three extraordinary women who gained both regional and international recognition: Dame Nita Barrow of Barbados, Berenice Dolly of Trinidad and Tobago, and Dr. Mary Sievwright of Jamaica. A feminist and colonialist theoretical perspective is used for the exploration of political, social and economic structures of the societies prior and during the nurses' era in order to provide a context for their achievements and contributions. They were bright, black women who embraced each challenge that came their way as an opportunity for growth. This growth was not for personal gain or self-aggrandizement but for the good of womankind and the nursing profession...The single common distinguishing feature of these three women was their selfless devotion to service. They worked relentlessly to improve the image of nursing, the nursing profession, and the status of women. Each one did so in her own unique way, and each had a deep, abiding religious faith. Their stories depict their different approaches to their service to women generally and nursing specifically, whether it was in the international arena, in the Caribbean setting or in their own native land. They were outstanding role models. They rose to prominence in a society in which racism, gender and class distinctions existed and did so with continued vitality and political savvy then most women at the time. They defied tradition within a traditional woman's occupation. They blazed the way for black women and nurses in particular to reach for the top. They were the first black women in nursing in the Caribbean to receive national and international acclaim, albeit not all to the same extent, and were the acknowledged role models for black nurses and women in the region.
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Women Who Launch

The Women Who Shattered Glass Ceilings

Author: Marlene Wagman-Geller

Publisher: Mango Media Inc.

ISBN: 1633536963

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 1935

Empowering stories of game-changing women Dorothy Parker observed, “It’s a man’s world;” the lady entrepreneurs and game-changers profiled in Women Who Launch would beg to differ. Unlike the matrons of the 1950s-the women who lunched-these kick-ass females left their DNA in the annals of time. A history of women in business and beyond: Julia Ward-Howe showed what’s good for the goose is good for the gander when she created the Girl Scouts of America. Sara Joseph Hale-authoress of Mary had a Little Lamb- convinced Lincoln to launch a national day of thanks while Anna Jarvis persuaded President Wilson to initiate a day in tribute of mothers. Estee Lauder revolutionized the cosmetics industry. The tradition of these Mothers of Invention continued when, compliments of knitter Krista Suh, the heads of millions were adorned with pink, pussy-cat ears in the largest women's march in history. These women who launched prove-in the words of Rosie the Riveter, “We can do it!” Biographies of women creators, innovators, and leaders: Women Who Launch is filled with inspiring true stories of women activists, artists, entrepreneurs who launched some of the most famous companies, brands, and organizations today and changed the world. It is at once a collection of biographies and a testament of female empowerment. Readers will find: • The stories behind renowned companies, brands, and organizations and the diverse women who launched them • Empowering quotes from strong women and those who refused to be kept down • Motivation to all women who want to succeed in their careers, launch companies, and change the world Find motivation in your career and life with the amazing history of women entrepreneurship, activism, and leadership.
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Through the Labyrinth

The Truth about how Women Become Leaders

Author: Alice Hendrickson Eagly,Linda Lorene Carli

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1422116913

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 308

View: 7536

Despite real progress, women remain rare enough in elite positions of power that their presence still evokes a sense of wonder. InThrough the Labyrinth, Alice Eagly and Linda Carli examine why women’s paths to power remain difficult to traverse. First, Eagly and Carli prove that the glass ceiling is no longer a useful metaphor and offer seven reasons why. They propose the labyrinth as a better image and explain how to navigate through it. This important and practical book addresses such critical questions as: How far have women actually come as leaders? Do stereotypes and prejudices still limit women’s opportunities? Do people resist women’s leadership more than men’s? And, do organisations create obstacles to women who would be leaders? This book’s rich analysis is founded on scientific research from psychology, economics, sociology, political science, and management. The authors ground their conclusions in that research and invoke a wealth of engaging anecdotes and personal accounts to illustrate the practical principles that emerge. With excellent leadership in short supply, no group, organisation, or nation can afford to restrict women’s access to leadership roles. This book evaluates whether such restrictions are present and, when they are, what we can do to eliminate them.
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Presumed Incompetent

The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

Author: Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs,Yolanda Flores Niemann,Carmen G. González,Angela P. Harris

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1457181223

Category: Education

Page: 588

View: 1188

Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America.
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The Glass Universe

How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars

Author: Dava Sobel

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 069814869X

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 8024

New from #1 New York Times bestselling author Dava Sobel, the "inspiring" (People), little-known true story of women's landmark contributions to astronomy "A joy to read.” —The Wall Street Journal Named one of the best books of the year by NPR, The Economist, Smithsonian, Nature, and NPR's Science Friday Nominated for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award In the mid-nineteenth century, the Harvard College Observatory began employing women as calculators, or “human computers,” to interpret the observations their male counterparts made via telescope each night. At the outset this group included the wives, sisters, and daughters of the resident astronomers, but soon the female corps included graduates of the new women's colleges—Vassar, Wellesley, and Smith. As photography transformed the practice of astronomy, the ladies turned from computation to studying the stars captured nightly on glass photographic plates. The “glass universe” of half a million plates that Harvard amassed over the ensuing decades—through the generous support of Mrs. Anna Palmer Draper, the widow of a pioneer in stellar photography—enabled the women to make extraordinary discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim. They helped discern what stars were made of, divided the stars into meaningful categories for further research, and found a way to measure distances across space by starlight. Their ranks included Williamina Fleming, a Scottish woman originally hired as a maid who went on to identify ten novae and more than three hundred variable stars; Annie Jump Cannon, who designed a stellar classification system that was adopted by astronomers the world over and is still in use; and Dr. Cecilia Helena Payne, who in 1956 became the first ever woman professor of astronomy at Harvard—and Harvard’s first female department chair. Elegantly written and enriched by excerpts from letters, diaries, and memoirs, The Glass Universe is the hidden history of the women whose contributions to the burgeoning field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe.
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Empress of the East

How a European Slave Girl Became Queen of the Ottoman Empire

Author: Leslie Peirce

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093094

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7175

The extraordinary story of the Russian slave girl Roxelana, who rose from concubine to become the only queen of the Ottoman empire In Empress of the East, historian Leslie Peirce tells the remarkable story of a Christian slave girl, Roxelana, who was abducted by slave traders from her Ruthenian homeland and brought to the harem of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent in Istanbul. Suleyman became besotted with her and foreswore all other concubines. Then, in an unprecedented step, he freed her and married her. The bold and canny Roxelana soon became a shrewd diplomat and philanthropist, who helped Suleyman keep pace with a changing world in which women, from Isabella of Hungary to Catherine de Medici, increasingly held the reins of power. Until now Roxelana has been seen as a seductress who brought ruin to the empire, but in Empress of the East, Peirce reveals the true history of an elusive figure who transformed the Ottoman harem into an institution of imperial rule.
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The Glass Castle

A Memoir

Author: Jeannette Walls

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439156964

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 6023

The child of an alcoholic father and an eccentric artist mother discusses her family's nomadic upbringing, during which she and her siblings fended for themselves while their parents outmaneuvered bill collectors and the authorities.
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Shattering the Glass

The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball

Author: Pamela Grundy,Susan Shackelford

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469626012

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 6958

Reaching back over a century of struggle, liberation, and gutsy play, Shattering the Glass is a sweeping chronicle of women's basketball in the United States. Offering vivid portraits of forgotten heroes and contemporary stars, Pamela Grundy and Susan Shackelford provide a broad perspective on the history of the sport, exploring its close relationship to concepts of womanhood, race, and sexuality, and to efforts to expand women's rights. Extensively illustrated and drawing on original interviews with players, coaches, administrators, and broadcasters, Shattering the Glass presents a moving, gritty view of the game on and off the court. It is both an insightful history and an empowering story of the generations of women who have shaped women's basketball.
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Class and Social Mobility

Author: Lisa Firth

Publisher: Independence Publishers

ISBN: 9781861686046

Category: Class consciousness

Page: 48

View: 4791

This volume looks at the issue of class and whether it is an impediment to social mobility, covering issues such as the debate surrounding unpaid internships, public school dominance of top jobs and whether terms such as 'chav' and 'underclass' are responsible for demonising the working classes.
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White Working Class

Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1633693791

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 192

View: 4467

Around the world, populist movements are gaining traction among the white working class. Meanwhile, members of the professional elite—journalists, managers, and establishment politicians—are on the outside looking in, left to argue over the reasons. In White Working Class, Joan C. Williams, described as having “something approaching rock star status” by the New York Times, explains why so much of the elite’s analysis of the white working class is misguided, rooted in class cluelessness. Williams explains that many people have conflated “working class” with “poor”—but the working class is, in fact, the elusive, purportedly disappearing middle class. They often resent the poor and the professionals alike. But they don’t resent the truly rich, nor are they particularly bothered by income inequality. Their dream is not to join the upper middle class, with its different culture, but to stay true to their own values in their own communities—just with more money. While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness. White Working Class is a blunt, bracing narrative that sketches a nuanced portrait of millions of people who have proven to be a potent political force. For anyone stunned by the rise of populist, nationalist movements, wondering why so many would seemingly vote against their own economic interests, or simply feeling like a stranger in their own country, White Working Class will be a convincing primer on how to connect with a crucial set of workers—and voters.
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Class Lives

Stories from across Our Economic Divide

Author: Chuck Collins,Jennifer Ladd,Maynard Seider,Felice Yeskel

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801454522

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 7417

Class Lives is an anthology of narratives dramatizing the lived experience of class in America. It includes forty original essays from authors who represent a range of classes, genders, races, ethnicities, ages, and occupations across the United States. Born into poverty, working class, the middle class, and the owning class—and every place in between—the contributors describe their class journeys in narrative form, recounting one or two key stories that illustrate their growing awareness of class and their place, changing or stable, within the class system. The stories in Class Lives are both gripping and moving. One contributor grows up in hunger and as an adult becomes an advocate for the poor and homeless. Another acknowledges the truth that her working-class father's achievements afforded her and the rest of the family access to people with power. A gifted child from a working-class home soon understands that intelligence is a commodity but finds his background incompatible with his aspirations and so attempts to divide his life into separate worlds. Together, these essays form a powerful narrative about the experience of class and the importance of learning about classism, class cultures, and the intersections of class, race, and gender. Class Lives will be a helpful resource for students, teachers, sociologists, diversity trainers, activists, and a general audience. It will leave readers with an appreciation of the poignancy and power of class and the journeys that Americans grapple with on a daily basis.
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