The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking

Author: Brooke Borel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022629109X

Category: Reference

Page: 192

View: 3636

“A column by Glenn Garvin on Dec. 20 stated that the National Science Foundation ‘funded a study on Jell-O wrestling at the South Pole.’ That is incorrect. The event took place during off-duty hours without NSF permission and did not involve taxpayer funds.” Corrections such as this one from the Miami Herald have become a familiar sight for readers, especially as news cycles demand faster and faster publication. While some factual errors can be humorous, they nonetheless erode the credibility of the writer and the organization. And the pressure for accuracy and accountability is increasing at the same time as in-house resources for fact-checking are dwindling. Anyone who needs or wants to learn how to verify names, numbers, quotations, and facts is largely on their own. Enter The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking, an accessible, one-stop guide to the why, what, and how of contemporary fact-checking. Brooke Borel, an experienced fact-checker, draws on the expertise of more than 200 writers, editors, and fellow checkers representing the New Yorker, Popular Science, This American Life, Vogue, and many other outlets. She covers best practices for fact-checking in a variety of media—from magazine articles, both print and online, to books and documentaries—and from the perspective of both in-house and freelance checkers. She also offers advice on navigating relationships with writers, editors, and sources; considers the realities of fact-checking on a budget and checking one’s own work; and reflects on the place of fact-checking in today’s media landscape. “If journalism is a cornerstone of democracy, then fact-checking is its building inspector,” Borel writes. The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking is the practical—and thoroughly vetted—guide that writers, editors, and publishers need to maintain their credibility and solidify their readers’ trust.
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The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking

Author: Brooke Borel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022629093X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 180

View: 3971

This is an accessible, one-stop guide to the why, what, and how of contemporary fact-checking. Brooke Borel, an experienced fact-checker, draws on the expertise of more than 200 writers, editors, and fellow checkers representing the New Yorker, Popular Science, This American Life, Vogue, and many other outlets. She covers best practices for fact-checking in a variety of media - from magazine articles, both print and online, to books and documentaries - and from the perspective of both in-house and freelance checkers. She also offers advice on navigating relationships with writers, editors, and sources; considers the realities of fact-checking on a budget and checking one's own work; and reflects on the place of fact-checking in today's media landscape
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The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking

Author: Brooke Borel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226290768

Category: Reference

Page: 192

View: 3127

“A column by Glenn Garvin on Dec. 20 stated that the National Science Foundation ‘funded a study on Jell-O wrestling at the South Pole.’ That is incorrect. The event took place during off-duty hours without NSF permission and did not involve taxpayer funds.” Corrections such as this one from the Miami Herald have become a familiar sight for readers, especially as news cycles demand faster and faster publication. While some factual errors can be humorous, they nonetheless erode the credibility of the writer and the organization. And the pressure for accuracy and accountability is increasing at the same time as in-house resources for fact-checking are dwindling. Anyone who needs or wants to learn how to verify names, numbers, quotations, and facts is largely on their own. Enter The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking, an accessible, one-stop guide to the why, what, and how of contemporary fact-checking. Brooke Borel, an experienced fact-checker, draws on the expertise of more than 200 writers, editors, and fellow checkers representing the New Yorker, Popular Science, This American Life, Vogue, and many other outlets. She covers best practices for fact-checking in a variety of media—from magazine articles, both print and online, to books and documentaries—and from the perspective of both in-house and freelance checkers. She also offers advice on navigating relationships with writers, editors, and sources; considers the realities of fact-checking on a budget and checking one’s own work; and reflects on the place of fact-checking in today’s media landscape. “If journalism is a cornerstone of democracy, then fact-checking is its building inspector,” Borel writes. The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking is the practical—and thoroughly vetted—guide that writers, editors, and publishers need to maintain their credibility and solidify their readers’ trust.
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The Fact Checker's Bible

A Guide to Getting It Right

Author: Sarah Harrison Smith

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307428540

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 3748

These days fact-checking can seem like a lost art. The Fact Checker's Bible arrives not a moment too soon: it is the first—and essential—guide to the important but increasingly neglected task of checking facts, whatever their source. We are all overwhelmed with information that claims to be factual, but even the most punctilious researcher, writer, and journalist can sometimes get it wrong, so checking facts has become a more pressing task. Now Sarah Harrison Smith, former New Yorker fact checker and currently head of checking for The New York Times Magazine explains exactly how to: *Reading for accuracy *Determine what to check *Research the facts *Assess sources: people, newspapers and magazines, books, the Internet, etc. *Check quotations *Understand the legal liabilities *Look out for and avoid the dangers of plagiarism For everyone from students to journalists to editors, the methods and practices outlined in The Fact Checker’s Bible provide both a standard and a working manual for how to get the facts right. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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How to Write a BA Thesis

A Practical Guide from Your First Ideas to Your Finished Paper

Author: Charles Lipson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226481272

Category: Reference

Page: 402

View: 2320

The senior thesis is the capstone of a college education, but writing one can be a daunting prospect. Students need to choose their own topic and select the right adviser. Then they need to work steadily for several months as they research, write, and manage a major independent project. Now there's a mentor to help. How to Write a BA Thesis is a practical, friendly guide written by Charles Lipson, an experienced professor who has guided hundreds of students through the thesis-writing process. This book offers step-by-step advice on how to turn a vague idea into a clearly defined proposal, then a draft paper, and, ultimately, a polished thesis. Lipson also tackles issues beyond the classroom-from good work habits to coping with personal problems that interfere with research and writing. Filled with examples and easy-to-use highlighted tips, the book also includes handy time schedules that show when to begin various tasks and how much time to spend on each. Convenient checklists remind students which steps need special attention, and a detailed appendix, filled with examples, shows how to use the three main citation systems in the humanities and social sciences: MLA, APA, and Chicago. How to Write a BA Thesis will help students work more comfortably and effectively-on their own and with their advisers. Its clear guidelines and sensible advice make it the perfect text for thesis workshops. Students and their advisers will refer again and again to this invaluable resource. From choosing a topic to preparing the final paper, How to Write a BA Thesis helps students turn a daunting prospect into a remarkable achievement.
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The Best in Children's Books

The University of Chicago Guide to Children's Literature, 1966-72

Author: Zena Sutherland

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226780573

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 491

View: 5238

With so many new children's books published each year, how can children learn to choose good books, and how can adults help them? This guide is designed to aid adults—parents, teachers, librarians—in selecting from the best children's literature published in recent years. By encouraging reading and ownership of books, by suggesting better books, and by discussing good books with enthusiasm and understanding, adults may help children to acquire discrimination in reading. This guide contains 1,400 reviews of the best children's literature published between 1966 and 1972.
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The Chicago Guide to Grammar, Usage, and Punctuation

Author: Bryan A. Garner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780226188850

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 552

View: 7758

Few people today can write with the same authority on the English language as Bryan A. Garner. In this comprehensive work, he expands his popular and much-consulted chapter from the Chicago Manual of Style to cover not only grammar and usage but also syntax, word formation, and punctuation. The book offers advice and explanations for what constitutes standard literary Englishthe forms that mark writers and speakers as educated users of the languagealong with some historical context for understanding the development of these forms. Special features include a discussion of how the canonical parts of speech came to be identified, coverage of both traditional sentence diagramming and contemporary transformational grammar, and several dozen Google Ngrams illustrating how the usage of specific terms has evolved over the centuries of printed English books. The book concludes with an exhaustive glossary of grammatical terms and a bibliography of suggested readings. It is a magisterial work, the culmination of Garner s several decades of study of the English language."
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What Editors Want

An Author's Guide to Scientific Journal Publishing

Author: Philippa J. Benson,Susan C. Silver

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226043134

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 178

View: 3446

Research publications have always been key to building a successful career in science, yet little if any formal guidance is offered to young scientists on how to get research papers peer reviewed, accepted, and published by leading scientific journals. With What Editors Want, Philippa J. Benson and Susan C. Silver, two well-respected editors from the science publishing community, remedy that situation with a clear, straightforward guide that will be of use to all scientists. Benson and Silver instruct readers on how to identify the journals that are most likely to publish a given paper, how to write an effective cover letter, how to avoid common pitfalls of the submission process, and how to effectively navigate the all-important peer review process, including dealing with revisions and rejection. With supplemental advice from more than a dozen experts, this book will equip scientists with the knowledge they need to usher their papers through publication.
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The Art of Creative Research

A Field Guide for Writers

Author: Philip Gerard

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022617980X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 3695

Everyone who writes a novel, a poem, or a memoir almost certainly conducts research along the waywhether to develop a story idea, or to capture the voice, the speech patterns, or the exact words of a character, or to ensure authenticity or accuracy of detail in describing a person, a place, an object, a setting. This kind of experiential research is an art form of its own, and this book is the first to treat it as such. Addressing writers of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, Philip Gerard covers all the different kinds of archives that might inform creative work, including historical documents, site visits, interviews, and memory. He offers practical tips for drawing on these different types of sources, including such mundane matters as planning and budgeting for travel costs, arranging access in advance, and troubleshooting when plans go awry. And he illustrates how the insights gleaned from research can be incorporated into stories, poems, and nonfiction using examples from a wide range of writers."
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Deciding What’s True

The Rise of Political Fact-Checking in American Journalism

Author: Lucas Graves

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231542224

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 5357

Over the past decade, American outlets such as PolitiFact, FactCheck.org, and the Washington Post's Fact Checker have shaken up the political world by holding public figures accountable for what they say. Cited across social and national news media, these verdicts can rattle a political campaign and send the White House press corps scrambling. Yet fact-checking is a fraught kind of journalism, one that challenges reporters' traditional roles as objective observers and places them at the center of white-hot, real-time debates. As these journalists are the first to admit, in a hyperpartisan world, facts can easily slip into fiction, and decisions about which claims to investigate and how to judge them are frequently denounced as unfair play. Deciding What's True draws on Lucas Graves's unique access to the members of the newsrooms leading this movement. Graves vividly recounts the routines of journalists at three of these hyperconnected, technologically innovative organizations and what informs their approach to a story. Graves also plots a compelling, personality-driven history of the fact-checking movement and its recent evolution from the blogosphere, reflecting on its revolutionary remaking of journalistic ethics and practice. His book demonstrates the ways these rising organizations depend on professional networks and media partnerships yet have also made inroads with the academic and philanthropic worlds. These networks have become a vital source of influence as fact-checking spreads around the world.
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Glossary of Typesetting Terms

Author: Richard Eckersley,Richard Angstadt,Charles M. Ellertson,Richard Hendel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226183732

Category: Reference

Page: 177

View: 4041

Glossary of Typesetting Terms is an up-to-date reference book on the craft of typography. It organizes a dictionary and a style guide into a single, one-stop resource. Prepared by a team of leading professionals—a designer, an editor, compositors, and production managers—this glossary will be valuable to anyone who works in publishing or printing for its definitions of typographical terms and concise treatment of typographical style. The glossary adds important details to discussions of typography that are covered more generally in editorial style guides such as The Chicago Manual of Style. It is indispensable to anyone who prepares text for a living, including those who implement their own typesetting decisions with the aid of word-processing and page-layout software. This manual furnishes a common technical vocabulary for specialists and nonspecialists alike. More than 900 entries provide up-to-date meanings for traditional terms like kerning,bleed, and thumbnail and definitions of new phrases like global search and replace,H & J (hyphenation and justification), and idiot file that have been developed to describe the role of computer technology in typesetting. Eight appendixes offer additional guidance. The house style sheets of a major typesetter provide a sample checklist of items that affect the way in which words are composed into professional-quality type. Other appendixes cover families of type, the parts of a book, diagrams of the parts of a letter, coding and marking a manuscript in the precise language of typesetters, writing specifications for tables, proofreaders’ marks, and special characters. No other reference book makes the vocabulary and practices of contemporary typesetting so accessible.
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The Subversive Copy Editor

Advice from Chicago (or, How to Negotiate Good Relationships with Your Writers, Your Colleagues, and Yourself)

Author: Carol Fisher Saller

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226734102

Category: Reference

Page: 148

View: 6063

Each year writers and editors submit over three thousand grammar and style questions to the Q&A page at The Chicago Manual of Style Online. Some are arcane, some simply hilarious—and one editor, Carol Fisher Saller, reads every single one of them. All too often she notes a classic author-editor standoff, wherein both parties refuse to compromise on the "rights" and "wrongs" of prose styling: "This author is giving me a fit." "I wish that I could just DEMAND the use of the serial comma at all times." "My author wants his preface to come at the end of the book. This just seems ridiculous to me. I mean, it’s not a post-face." In The Subversive Copy Editor, Saller casts aside this adversarial view and suggests new strategies for keeping the peace. Emphasizing habits of carefulness, transparency, and flexibility, she shows copy editors how to build an environment of trust and cooperation. One chapter takes on the difficult author; another speaks to writers themselves. Throughout, the focus is on serving the reader, even if it means breaking "rules" along the way. Saller’s own foibles and misadventures provide ample material: "I mess up all the time," she confesses. "It’s how I know things." Writers, Saller acknowledges, are only half the challenge, as copy editors can also make trouble for themselves. (Does any other book have an index entry that says "terrorists. See copy editors"?) The book includes helpful sections on e-mail etiquette, work-flow management, prioritizing, and organizing computer files. One chapter even addresses the special concerns of freelance editors. Saller’s emphasis on negotiation and flexibility will surprise many copy editors who have absorbed, along with the dos and don’ts of their stylebooks, an attitude that their way is the right way. In encouraging copy editors to banish their ignorance and disorganization, insecurities and compulsions, the Chicago Q&A presents itself as a kind of alter ego to the comparatively staid Manual of Style. In The Subversive Copy Editor, Saller continues her mission with audacity and good humor.
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News on the Internet

Information and Citizenship in the 21st Century

Author: David Tewksbury,Jason Rittenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199939306

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 683

Online news sites play an ever-pervasive role in the daily gathering and flow of political information. Media has always played an intermediary role in the way that citizens receive and process news, but, with the speed of information transmission, the segmentation of news sources, and the rise of citizen journalism, issues of authority, audience, and even the definition of "news" have shifted and become blurred. News on the Internet synthesizes research on developing and current patterns of online news provision with the literature on traditional, offline media to create a conceptual map for understanding the way that public affairs and news are presented and consumed on the internet. Tewksbury and Rittenberg look at the dual role of the internet as a source of authoritative news and as a vehicle for citizens in contemporary democracies to create and share political information. Throughout, they address the tension between the benefits of internet news provision, specifically increased citizen engagement, and the negative, perhaps counterintuitive, effects: the fragmentation of knowledge and polarization of opinion in contemporary democracies. News on the Internet focuses on these points of conflict and contradiction in the online news environment and offers conclusions and predictions for how these phenomena will develop in the future.
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The Business of Being a Writer

Author: Jane Friedman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022639333X

Category: Reference

Page: 368

View: 8276

Writers talk about their work in many ways: as an art, as a calling, as a lifestyle. Too often missing from these conversations is the fact that writing is also a business. The reality is, those who want to make a full- or part-time job out of writing are going to have a more positive and productive career if they understand the basic business principles underlying the industry. The Business of Being a Writer offers the business education writers need but so rarely receive. It is meant for early-career writers looking to develop a realistic set of expectations about making money from their work or for working writers who want a better understanding of the industry. Writers will gain a comprehensive picture of how the publishing world works—from queries and agents to blogging and advertising—and will learn how they can best position themselves for success over the long term. Jane Friedman has more than twenty years of experience in the publishing industry, with an emphasis on digital media strategy for authors and publishers. She is encouraging without sugarcoating, blending years of research with practical advice that will help writers market themselves and maximize their writing-related income. It will leave them empowered, confident, and ready to turn their craft into a career.
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Infested

How the Bed Bug Infiltrated Our Bedrooms and Took Over the World

Author: Brooke Borel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022604193X

Category: Nature

Page: 259

View: 8017

A biological and cultural history of the bed bug explores ongoing scientific discoveries, the advent of DDT, the flourishing emergence of current infestations, the economics of bed bug problems and the ways that bed bugs have inspired art.
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Telling True Stories

A Nonfiction Writers' Guide from the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University

Author: Mark Kramer,Wendy Call

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440628947

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 2620

Inspiring stories and practical advice from America’s most respected journalists The country’s most prominent journalists and nonfiction authors gather each year at Harvard’s Nieman Conference on Narrative Journalism. Telling True Stories presents their best advice—covering everything from finding a good topic, to structuring narrative stories, to writing and selling your first book. More than fifty well-known writers offer their most powerful tips, including: • Tom Wolfe on the emotional core of the story • Gay Talese on writing about private lives • Malcolm Gladwell on the limits of profiles • Nora Ephron on narrative writing and screenwriters • Alma Guillermoprieto on telling the story and telling the truth • Dozens of Pulitzer Prize–winning journalists from the Atlantic Monthly, New Yorker, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post and more . . . The essays contain important counsel for new and career journalists, as well as for freelance writers, radio producers, and memoirists. Packed with refreshingly candid and insightful recommendations, Telling True Stories will show anyone fascinated by the art of writing nonfiction how to bring people, scenes, and ideas to life on the page. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Wikileaks and the Age of Transparency

Author: Micah L. Sifry

Publisher: OR Books

ISBN: 1935928317

Category: Transparency in government

Page: 211

View: 5582

WikiLeaks' release of a massive trove of secret official documents has riled politicians from across the spectrum, welcoming in the Age of Transparency. But political analyst and writer Micah Sifry argues that WikiLeaks is not the whole story: it is a symptom, an indicator of an ongoing generational and philosophical struggle between older, closed systems, and the new open culture of the Internet. Sifry, who has worked with and knows Julian Assange, cogently explores the implications of WikiLeaks' ascendancy.
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Student's Guide to Writing College Papers

Fourth Edition

Author: Kate L. Turabian

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226816333

Category: Reference

Page: 288

View: 2385

High school students, two-year college students, and university students all need to know how to write a well-reasoned, coherent research paper—and for decades Kate Turabian’s Student’s Guide to Writing College Papers has helped them to develop this critical skill. In the new fourth edition of Turabian’s popular guide, the team behind Chicago’s widely respected The Craft of Research has reconceived and renewed this classic for today’s generation. Designed for less advanced writers than Turabian’s Manual of Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Seventh Edition, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams here introduce students to the art of defining a topic, doing high-quality research with limited resources, and writing an engaging and solid college paper. The Student’s Guide is organized into three sections that lead students through the process of developing and revising a paper. Part 1, "Writing Your Paper," guides students through the research process with discussions of choosing and developing a topic, validating sources, planning arguments, writing drafts, avoiding plagiarism, and presenting evidence in tables and figures. Part 2, "Citing Sources," begins with a succinct introduction to why citation is important and includes sections on the three major styles students might encounter in their work—Chicago, MLA, and APA—all with full coverage of electronic source citation. Part 3, "Style," covers all matters of style important to writers of college papers, from punctuation to spelling to presenting titles, names, and numbers. With the authority and clarity long associated with the name Turabian, the fourth edition of Student’s Guide to Writing College Papers is both a solid introduction to the research process and a convenient handbook to the best practices of writing college papers. Classroom tested and filled with relevant examples and tips, this is a reference that students, and their teachers, will turn to again and again.
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You Can't Make This Stuff Up

The Complete Guide to Writing Creative Nonfiction--from Memoir to Literary Journalism and Everything in Between

Author: Lee Gutkind

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0738215864

Category: Reference

Page: 288

View: 6351

From rags-to-riches-to-rags tell-alls to personal health sagas to literary journalism everyone seems to want to try their hand at creative nonfiction. Now, Lee Gutkind, the go-to expert for all things creative nonfiction, taps into one of the fastest-growing genres with this new writing guide. Frank and to-the-point, with depth and clarity, Gutkind describes and illustrates each and every aspect of the genre, from defining a concept and establishing a writing process to the final product. Offering new ways of understanding genre and invaluable tools for writers to learn and experiment with, You Can't Make This Stuff Up allows writers of all skill levels to thoroughly expand and stylize their work.
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The Wandering Mind

What the Brain Does When You're Not Looking

Author: Michael C. Corballis

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022623861X

Category: Medical

Page: 184

View: 2934

"The point of this piece of writing is to get you to pick up this book. But what if it takes us a few sentences to explain? What if we need to go into some detail? Are you even going to be paying attention by that point, or will your mind already have wandered off somewhere, not caring a whit about the book you're holding in your hand? It's pretty likely. In fact, some studies suggest that we spend as much as fifty percent of our waking life failing to focus on the task at hand. But does that represent a problem? Michael C. Corballis doesn't think so, and with The Wandering Mind, he shows us why, rehabilitating woolgathering and revealing its incredibly useful effects. Drawing on the latest research from cognitive science and evolutionary biology, Corballis shows us how mind-wandering not only frees us from moment-to-moment drudgery, but also from the limitations of our immediate selves. Mind-wandering strengthens our imagination, fueling the flights of invention, storytelling, and empathy that underlie our shared humanity; furthermore, he explains, our tendency to wander back and forth throught the timeline of our lives is fundamental to our very sense of ourselves as coherent, continuing personalities. Full of unusual examples and surprising discoveries, [this book] mounts a vigorous defense of inattention--even as it never fails to hold the reader's." -- Front jacket flap.
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