The Archaeology and Ethnography of Central Africa

Author: James Denbow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107040701

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 2623

This book provides the first detailed description of the prehistory of the Loango coast of west-central Africa over the course of more than 3,000 years.
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Race and Affluence

An Archaeology of African America and Consumer Culture

Author: Paul R. Mullins

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306471639

Category: Social Science

Page: 217

View: 6656

An archaeological analysis of the centrality of race and racism in American culture. Using a broad range of material, historical, and ethnographic resources from Annapolis, Maryland, during the period 1850 to 1930, the author probes distinctive African-American consumption patterns and examines how those patterns resisted the racist assumptions of the dominant culture while also attempting to demonstrate African-Americans' suitability to full citizenship privileges.
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Imagining the Post-Apartheid State

An Ethnographic Account of Namibia

Author: John T. Friedman

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857450913

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 4105

In northwest Namibia, people's political imagination offers a powerful insight into the post-apartheid state. Based on extensive anthropological fieldwork, this book focuses on the former South African apartheid regime and the present democratic government; it compares the perceptions and practices of state and customary forms of judicial administration, reflects upon the historical trajectory of a chieftaincy dispute in relation to the rooting of state power and examines everyday forms of belonging in the independent Namibian State. By elucidating the State through a focus on the social, historical and cultural processes that help constitute it, this study helps chart new territory for anthropology, and it contributes an ethnographic perspective to a wider set of interdisciplinary debates on the State and state processes.
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The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art

Author: Bruno David,Ian J. McNiven

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190844957

Category: Social Science

Page: 1168

View: 5494

Rock art is one of the most visible and geographically widespread of cultural expressions, and it spans much of the period of our species' existence. Rock art also provides rare and often unique insights into the minds and visually creative capacities of our ancestors and how selected rock outcrops with distinctive images were used to construct symbolic landscapes and shape worldviews. Equally important, rock art is often central to the expression of and engagement with spiritual entities and forces, and in all these dimensions it signals the diversity of cultural practices, across place and through time. Over the past 150 years, archaeologists have studied ancient arts on rock surfaces, both out in the open and within caves and rock shelters, and social anthropologists have revealed how people today use art in their daily lives. The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art showcases examples of such research from around the world and across a broad range of cultural contexts, giving a sense of the art's regional variability, its antiquity, and how it is meaningful to people in the recent past and today - including how we have ourselves tended to make sense of the art of others, replete with our own preconceptions. It reviews past, present, and emerging theoretical approaches to rock art investigation and presents new, cutting-edge methods of rock art analysis for the student and professional researcher alike.
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The Zimbabwe Culture

Origins and Decline of Southern Zambezian States

Author: Innocent Pikirayi

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0585386498

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4120

Offering a unique and original perspective on the rise and fall of indigenous states of southern Zambezia, The Zimbabwe Culture analyzes the long contentious history of the remains of the remarkable cyclopean masonry, ranging from mighty capitals of traditional kings to humble farmsteads. Forming a cornerstone of the geographical lore of Africa in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, debate on the origins, development, and collapse of the Zimbabwe culture has never ceased, and with increasing archaeological research over the twentieth century, has become more complex. Thoroughly examining the growth and decline of pre-colonial states on the entire Zimbabwean Plateau and southern Zambezia, Dr. Pikirayi has contributed tremendously towards the archaeological understanding of this extraordinary culture. The Zimbabwe Culture is essential reading for all students and avocationalists of African archaeology, history, and culture.
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The Archaeology of Africa

Food, Metals and Towns

Author: Bassey Andah,Alex Okpoko,Thurstan Shaw,Paul Sinclair

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134679424

Category: Social Science

Page: 896

View: 5671

Africa has a vibrant past. It emerges from this book as the proud possessor of a vast and highly complicated interweaving of peoples and cultures, practising an enormous diversity of economic and social strategies in an 2xtraordinary range of environmental situations. At long last the archaeology of Africa has revealed enough of Africa's unwritten past to confound preconceptions about this continent and to upset the picture inferred from historic written records. Without an understanding of its past complexities, it is impossible to grasp Africa's present, let alone its future.
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Traces of the Future

An Archaeology of Medical Science in Twenty-First Century Africa

Author: Paul Wenzel Geissler,Guillaume Lachenal,Nomi Tousignant,John Manton

Publisher: Intellect (UK)

ISBN: 9781783207251

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7515

This book presents a close look at the vestiges of twentieth-century medical work at five key sites in Africa: Senegal, Nigeria, Cameroon, Kenya, and Tanzania. The authors aim to understand the afterlife of scientific institutions and practices and the "aftertime" of scientific modernity and its attendant visions of progress and transformation. Straightforward scholarly work is juxtaposed here with altogether more experimental approaches to fieldwork and analysis, including interview fragments; brief, reflective essays; and a rich photographic archive. The result is an unprecedented view of the lingering traces of medical science from Africa's past.
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An Archaeology of Resistance

Materiality and Time in an African Borderland

Author: Alfredo González-Ruibal

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442230916

Category: Social Science

Page: 412

View: 5251

An Archaeology of Resistance: Materiality and Time in an African Borderland studies the tactics of resistance deployed by a variety of indigenous communities in the borderland between Sudan and Ethiopia.The main objective of the work is to understand the diverse forms of resistance that characterizes the borderland groups, with an emphasis on two essentially archaeological themes, materiality and time, by combining archaeological, political and social theory, ethnographic methods and historical data to examine different processes of resistance in the long term.
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The Archaeology of Tribal Societies

Author: William A. Parkinson

Publisher: International Monographs in Press

ISBN: 9781879621350

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 5818

Since the inception of the New Archaeology in the 1960s anthropological archaeologists have been attempting to develop models that will let them better understand the evolution of human social organization. The vast majority of this research has focused specifically upon the development of so-called 'complex' societies, which frequently are characterized by institutionalized social inequality, craft specialization, and developed social hierarchy. Conversely, a good deal of research also has focused upon the variability exhibited by highly mobile hunting and gathering societies. Somewhere in our search for understanding how chiefdoms and states evolve, and how different those societies are from egalitarian 'bands', we have neglected to develop models that will help us understand the wide range of variability that exists between them. This volume attempts to fill this gap by exploring social organization in tribal - or 'autonomous village' - societies from several different ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological contexts - from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic Period in the Near East to the contemporary Jivaro of Amazonia. The chapters cover diverse geographic (Old and New World) and temporal (early Holocene to the present) contexts and address a number of issues regarding economic, ideological, and political processes within tribal societies from the short-term to the longue dur�e.
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Hunters and Herders of Southern Africa

A Comparative Ethnography of the Khoisan Peoples

Author: Alan Barnard

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521428651

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 2933

The Khoisan are a cluster of southern African peoples, including the famous Bushmen or San "hunters," the Khoekhoe "herders" (in the past called "Hottentots"), and the Damara, also a herding people. Most Khoisan live in the Kalihari desert and surrounding areas of Botswana and Namibia. Despite differences in their ways of life, the various groups have much in common, and this book explores these similarities and the influence of environment on their culture and social organization. This is the first book on the Khoisan as a whole to be published since the 1930s.
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Pastoralism in Africa

Past, Present and Future

Author: Michael Bollig,Michael Schnegg,Hans-Peter Wotzka

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857459090

Category: Social Science

Page: 544

View: 2091

Pastoralism has shaped livelihoods and landscapes on the African continent for millennia. Mobile livestock husbandry has generally been portrayed as an economic strategy that successfully met the challenges of low biomass productivity and environmental variability in arid and semi-arid environments. This volume focuses on the emergence, diversity, and inherent dynamics of pastoralism in Africa based on research during a twelve-year period on the southwest and northeast regions. Unraveling the complex prehistory, history, and contemporary political ecology of African pastoralism, results in insight into the ingenuity and flexibility of historical and contemporary herders.
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An Ethnography of Global Environmentalism

Becoming Friends of the Earth

Author: Caroline Gatt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317975049

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 2956

Based on nine years of research, this is the first book to offer an in-depth ethnographic study of a transnational environmentalist federation and of activists themselves. The book presents an account of the daily life and the ethical strivings of environmental activist members of Friends of the Earth International (FoEI), exploring how a transnational federation is constituted and maintained, and how different people strive to work together in their hope of contributing to the creation of "a better future for the globe." In the context of FoEI, a great diversity of environmentalisms from around the world are negotiated, discussed and evolve in relation to the experiences of the different cultures, ecosystems and human situations that the activists bring with them to the federation. Key to the global scope of this project is the analysis of FoEI experiments in models for intercultural and inclusive decision-making. The provisional results of FoEI’s ongoing experiments in this area offer a glimpse of how different notions of the environment, and being an environmentalist, can come to work together without subsuming alterity.
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Ethnographies of Conservation

Environmentalism and the Distribution of Privilege

Author: David G. Anderson,Eeva Berglund

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9780857456748

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 9892

Anthropologists know that conservation often disempowers already under-privileged groups, and that it also fails to protect environments. Through a series of ethnographic studies, this book argues that the real problem is not the disappearance of "pristine nature" or even the land-use practices of uneducated people. Rather, what we know about culturally determined patterns of consumption, production and unequal distribution, suggests that critical attention would be better turned on discourses of "primitiveness" and "pristine nature" so prevalent within conservation ideology, and on the historically formed power and exchange relationships that they help perpetuate.
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The Archaeology of Portable Art

Southeast Asian, Pacific, and Australian Perspectives

Author: Michelle Langley,Mirani Litster,Duncan Wright,Sally K May

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315299097

Category: Social Science

Page: 342

View: 2354

The development of complex cultural behaviour in our own species is perhaps the most significant research issue in modern archaeology. Until recently, it was believed that our capacity for language and art only developed after some of our ancestors reached Europe around 40,000 years ago. Archaeological discoveries in Africa now show that modern humans were practicing symbolic behaviours prior to their dispersal from that continent, and more recent discoveries in Indonesia and Australia are once again challenging ideas about human cultural development.? Despite these significant discoveries and exciting potentials, there is a curious absence of published information about Asia-Pacific region, and consequently, global narratives of our most celebrated cognitive accomplishment — art — has consistently underrepresented the contribution of Southeast Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. This volume provides the first outline of what this region has to offer to the world of art in archaeology.? Readers undertaking tertiary archaeology courses interested in the art of the Asia-Pacific region or human behavioural evolution, along with anyone who is fascinated by the development of our modern ability to decorate ourselves and our world, should find this book a good addition to their library.?
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Making

Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture

Author: Tim Ingold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136763678

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 8336

Making creates knowledge, builds environments and transforms lives. Anthropology, archaeology, art and architecture are all ways of making, and all are dedicated to exploring the conditions and potentials of human life. In this exciting book, Tim Ingold ties the four disciplines together in a way that has never been attempted before. In a radical departure from conventional studies that treat art and architecture as compendia of objects for analysis, Ingold proposes an anthropology and archaeology not of but with art and architecture. He advocates a way of thinking through making in which sentient practitioners and active materials continually answer to, or ‘correspond’, with one another in the generation of form. Making offers a series of profound reflections on what it means to create things, on materials and form, the meaning of design, landscape perception, animate life, personal knowledge and the work of the hand. It draws on examples and experiments ranging from prehistoric stone tool-making to the building of medieval cathedrals, from round mounds to monuments, from flying kites to winding string, from drawing to writing. The book will appeal to students and practitioners alike, with interests in social and cultural anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art and design, visual studies and material culture.
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The Culture and Technology of African Iron Production

Author: Peter Ridgway Schmidt

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813013848

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 7048

Archaeological and ethnographic investigations in western Tanzania in the 1970s revealed remarkable evidence for a complex and highly advanced iron technology that existed there several thousand years ago. Still, Western scientific and historical practice continues to obscure the history of iron technology and its accomplishments in Africa. Weaving together myth, ritual, history, and science, this work describes the systems of smithing and iron smelting, some of which arose 2,000 to 2,500 years ago. Revealing the world of African technological achievement, the contributors to this work demonstrate that iron production there is a socially constructed activity and that its cultural and technological domains cannot be understood separately.
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The Archaeology of Southern Africa

Author: Peter Mitchell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521633895

Category: History

Page: 515

View: 9219

Southern Africa has one of the longest histories of occupation by modern humans and their ancestors anywhere in the world, over three million years. Research in Southern Africa is central to many key debates in contemporary archaeology, including hominid origins, the origins of anatomically modern humans and modern forms of behaviour, and the development of ethnographically informed perspectives for understanding rock art, of which the sub-continent boasts one of the richest heritages in the world. This is the first attempt at synthesis of the sub-continent's past for over forty years.
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The Archaeology of Rank

Author: Paul K. Wason

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521612005

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 439

Describes a range of methods used by archaeologists to infer ranking from archaeological data.
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The Rise and Fall of Swahili States

Author: Chapurukha Makokha Kusimba

Publisher: Altamira Press

ISBN: 9780761990512

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 1510

The Swahili civilization was a fascinating and complex system_a group of advanced cultures with large economic networks, international maritime trade, and urban sophistication. This book documents the growth of Swahili civilization on the eastern coast of Africa, from 100 B.C. to the time of European colonialism in the sixteenth century. Using archaeological, anthropological, and historical information, Chapurukha M. Kusimba describes the origins of this unique and powerful culture, including its Islamic components, architecture, language, and trading systems. Incorporating the results of his own surveys and excavations, Kusimba provides us with a remarkable African-derived study of the rise and collapse of societies on the Swahili Coast.
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Ethnographies of Reason

Author: Eric Livingston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317140672

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4631

Written by one of the most eminent scholars in the field, Ethnographies of Reason is a unique book in terms of the studies it presents, the perspective it develops and the research techniques it illustrates. Using concrete case study materials throughout, Eric Livingston offers a fundamentally different, ethnographic approach to the study of skill and reasoning. At the same time, he addresses a much neglected topic in the literature, illustrating practical techniques of ethnomethodological research and showing how such studies are actually conducted. The book is a major contribution to ethnomethodology, to social science methodology and to the study of skill and reasoning more generally.
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