The American women's movement, 1945-2000

a brief history with documents

Author: Nancy MacLean

Publisher: Bedford/st Martins

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 4862

The American women’s movement was one of the most influential social movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with small numbers, the women’s movement eventually involved tens of thousands of women and men. Longstanding ideas and habits came under scrutiny as activists questioned and changed the nation’s basic institutions, including all branches of government, the workplace, and the family. Nancy MacLean’s introduction and collection of primary sources engage students with the most up-to-date scholarship in U.S. women’s history. The introduction traces the deep roots of the women’s movement and demonstrates the continuity from women’s activism in the labor movement and New Deal networks, the black civil rights movement, and the peace movement to the height of Second Wave feminism and into the Third Wave. The primary sources reflect the social breadth and depth of the movement. Dispelling the misconception that the American women’s movement was solely a white, middle-class cause, the documents include the voices of women of all ages, classes, and ethnicities. Topics addressed range from wage discrimination, peace activism, housework and childcare, sexuality, and reproductive rights to welfare, education, socialism, violence against women, and more. Document headnotes, a chronology of the women’s movement, questions for consideration, a selected bibliography, and index support student learning, classroom discussion, and further research.
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Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and the Civil Rights Struggle of the 1950s and 1960s

A Brief History with Documents

Author: David Howard-Pitney

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312395056

Category: History

Page: 207

View: 2225

The civil rights movement’s most prominent leaders, Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) and Malcolm X (1925–1965), represent two wings of the revolt against racism: nonviolent resistance and revolution "by any means necessary." This volume presents the two leaders’ relationship to the civil rights movement beyond a simplified dualism. A rich selection of speeches, essays, and excerpts from Malcolm X’s autobiography and King’s sermons shows the breadth and range of each man’s philosophy, demonstrating their differences, similarities, and evolution over time. Organized into six topical groups, the documents allow students to compare the leaders’ views on subjects including integration, the American dream, means of struggle, and opposing racial philosophies. An interpretive introductory essay, chronology, selected bibliography, document headnotes, and questions for consideration provide further pedagogical support.
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American Empire at the Turn at the Twentieth Century

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Kristin L. Hoganson

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319065066

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 5782

This volume introduces students to primary documents on American empire from a pivotal era of U.S. expansion beyond the North American continent in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Along with covering a wide range of places-including Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines--the documents touch on a wide range of themes, among them race, citizenship, civilization, democracy, cross-cultural encounter, and self-determination. Kristin Hoganson's introduction provides the context essential to understanding this period and the ways in which the echoes of 1898 still reverberate today, including in the reach of U.S. power and the composition of the American people. Through a collection of sources representing the voices of those living under imperial rule as well as those imposing and opposing it, students can consider the American imperial endeavors. Document headnotes, maps, a Chronology of American Empire in the Caribbean and the Pacific, Questions for Consideration, and a Selected Bibliography provide pedagogical support.
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Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement

Author: Sally McMillen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199758609

Category: Social Science

Page: 322

View: 6741

In a quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement and change the course of history. The implications of that remarkable convention would be felt around the world and indeed are still being felt today. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Woman's Rights Movement, the latest contribution to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, Sally McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840-1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the lasting and transformative effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time--and destined to be thus regarded by the future historian." In this lively and warmly written study, Sally McMillen may well be the future historian Anthony was hoping to find. A vibrant portrait of a major turning point in American women's history, and in human history, this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to fully understand the origins of the woman's rights movement.
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Black Protest and the Great Migration

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Eric Arnesen

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312391294

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 928

During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassroots black activism in the South as well as the North were the manifestations of a new challenge to racial subordination. Eric Arnesen’s unique collection of articles from a variety of northern, southern, black, and white newspapers, magazines, and books explores the “Great Migration,” focusing on the economic, social, and political conditions of the Jim Crow South, the meanings of race in general — and on labor in particular — in the urban North, the grassroots movements of social protest that flourished in the war years, and the postwar “racial counterrevolution.” An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are included.
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The Civil Rights Movement and the Logic of Social Change

Author: Joseph E. Luders

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521116511

Category: Political Science

Page: 246

View: 4099

This book examines the success and failure of social movements to bring about change in American society, focusing on the targets of protests to explain diverse outcomes.
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The Urban Underworld in Late Nineteenth-Century New York: The Autobiography of George Appo

With Related Documents

Author: Timothy Gilfoyle

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312607623

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 7463

Through the colorful autobiography of pickpocket and con man George Appo, Timothy Gilfoyle brings to life the opium dens, organized criminals, and prisons that comprised the rapidly changing criminal underworld of late nineteenth-century America. The book's introduction and supporting documents, which include investigative reports and descriptions of Appo and his world, connect Appo's memoir to the larger story of urban New York and how and why crime changed during this period. It also explores factors of race and class that led some to a life of crime, the experience of criminal justice and incarceration, and the masculine codes of honor that marked the emergence of the nation's criminal subculture. Document headnotes, a chronology, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography offer additional pedagogical support.
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The Cherokee Removal

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Theda Perdue

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319049702

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5852

The Cherokee Removal of 1838–1839 unfolded against a complex backdrop of competing ideologies, self-interest, party politics, altruism, and ambition. Using documents that convey Cherokee voices, government policy, and white citizens’ views, Theda Perdue continues to present a multifaceted account of this complicated moment in American history. The third edition features new documents, including two contemporary newspaper articles and an interview with a former Cherokee slave. In addition, a new section allows readers to reflect on the legacy of the Trail of Tears and those affected by it. The introduction provides students with succinct historical background. Document headnotes contextualize the selections and draw attention to historical methodology. To aid students’ investigation of this compelling topic, the map and the chronology of the Cherokee Removal have been augmented by new questions for consideration and a selected bibliography.
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Femininity in Flight

A History of Flight Attendants

Author: Kathleen Barry

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822339465

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7962

DIVConsiders flight attendants as cultural icons, looking at the history of the occupation and how attendants redeployed the "glamorization" used to sell air travel to campaign for professional respect, higher wages, and women's rights./div
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The Political Life of Bella Abzug, 1976–1998

Electoral Failures and the Vagaries of Identity Politics

Author: Alan H. Levy

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739187252

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 5862

The Political Life of Bella Abzug, 1976–1998 is the second part of the first full biography of Bella Abzug. Alan H. Levy explores the political life of one of the most important women in politics in mid- and late-twentieth-century America. This second part takes up Abzug’s life from the point in 1976 when she narrowly lost her bid for the N.Y. Democratic Party’s nomination for the U.S. Senate. The biography follows her subsequent failed effort to win the Democratic Party’s nomination for Mayor of N.Y.C. in 1977, her leading a controversial National Women’s Convention in Houston in late 1977, her failed attempt to return to the U.S. Congress in 1978, and her conflicts with President Jimmy Carter and his administration. The biography then traces the efforts in which Abzug was engaged to regain political prominence, and her work on behalf of women at both national and international levels. Through the events in Abzug’s life, Levy explores tensions that surrounded the contrasts between political principles, which idealized a world in which gender posed no barriers to any human effort, and political views, which sought to extol and develop notions of gender and of ideas about its special meanings in human affairs and politics.
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Mothers of Conservatism

Women and the Postwar Right

Author: Michelle M. Nickerson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400842204

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4252

Mothers of Conservatism tells the story of 1950s Southern Californian housewives who shaped the grassroots right in the two decades following World War II. Michelle Nickerson describes how red-hunting homemakers mobilized activist networks, institutions, and political consciousness in local education battles, and she introduces a generation of women who developed political styles and practices around their domestic routines. From the conservative movement's origins in the early fifties through the presidential election of 1964, Nickerson documents how women shaped conservatism from the bottom up, out of the fabric of their daily lives and into the agenda of the Republican Party. A unique history of the American conservative movement, Mothers of Conservatism shows how housewives got out of the house and discovered their political capital.
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Speaking Out

Activism and Protest in the 1960s and 1970s

Author: Heather Ann Thompson

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN: 9780131942141

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 9033

Speaking Out : Activism and Protest in the 1960s and 1970s is a collection of readings about 21 different activist movements that came of age in the 60s and 70s. Introductions written by recognized scholars who have studied and written about these movements in depth begin each chapter, followed by primary source documents that provide insight into each movement. The chapters not only offer a comprehensive overview of the most important social and political activist groups of these two decades, but they also locate each group's complex origins, strengths, weaknesses, and legacy. As these authors make clear, ultimately the activist groups of this period each had their share of successes and each made their share of mistakes and miscalculations. Thus, together, they left a most complicated legacy for future generations.
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Where the Girls Are

Growing Up Female With the Mass Media

Author: Susan Jeanne Douglas

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN: 0812925300

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 531

A scholar and media critic takes a provocative look at the portrayal of women in American popular culture from the 1950s to the present day and assesses the impact of such images on women's real lives
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Behind the Mask of Chivalry

The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan

Author: Nancy K. MacLean

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198023650

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 3318

On Thanksgiving night, 1915, a small band of hooded men gathered atop Stone Mountain, an imposing granite butte just outside Atlanta. With a flag fluttering in the wind beside them, a Bible open to the twelfth chapter of Romans, and a flaming cross to light the night sky above, William Joseph Simmons and his disciples proclaimed themselves the new Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, named for the infamous secret order in which many of their fathers had served after the Civil War. Unsure of their footing in the New South and longing for the provincial, patriarchal world of the past, the men of the second Klan saw themselves as an army in training for a war between the races. They boasted that they had bonded into "an invisible phalanx...to stand as impregnable as a tower against every encroachment upon the white man's liberty...in the white man's country, under the white man's flag." Behind the Mask of Chivalry brings the "invisible phalanx" into broad daylight, culling from history the names, the life stories, and the driving passions of the anonymous Klansmen beneath the white hoods and robes. Using an unusual and rich cache of internal Klan records from Athens, Georgia, to anchor her observations, author Nancy MacLean combines a fine-grained portrait of a local Klan world with a penetrating analysis of the second Klan's ideas and politics nationwide. No other right-wing movement has ever achieved as much power as the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s, and this book shows how and why it did. MacLean reveals that the movement mobilized its millions of American followers largely through campaigns waged over issues that today would be called "family values": Prohibition violation, premarital sex, lewd movies, anxieties about women's changing roles, and worries over waning parental authority. Neither elites nor "poor white trash," most of the Klan rank and file were married, middle-aged, and middle class. Local meetings, or klonklaves, featured readings of the minutes, plans for recruitment campaigns and Klan barbecues, and distribution of educational materials--Christ and Other Klansmen was one popular tome. Nonetheless, as mundane as proceedings often were at the local level, crusades over "morals" always operated in the service of the Klan's larger agenda of virulent racial hatred and middle-class revanchism. The men who deplored sex among young people and sought to restore the power of husbands and fathers were also sworn to reclaim the "white man's country," striving to take the vote from blacks and bar immigrants. Comparing the Klan to the European fascist movements that grew out of the crucible of the first World War, MacLean maintains that the remarkable scope and frenzy of the movement reflected less on members' power within their communities than on the challenges to that power posed by African Americans, Jews, Catholics, immigrants, and white women and youth who did not obey the Klan's canon of appropriate conduct. In vigilante terror, the Klan's night riders acted out their movement's brutal determination to maintain inherited hierarchies of race, class, and gender. Compellingly readable and impeccably researched, The Mask of Chivalry is an unforgettable investigation of a crucial era in American history, and the social conditions, cultural currents, and ordinary men that built this archetypal American reactionary movement.
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Divided We Stand

The Battle Over Women's Rights and Family Values That Polarized American Politics

Author: Marjorie J. Spruill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632863154

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 6066

More than forty years ago, two women's movements drew a line in the sand between liberals and conservatives. The far-reaching legacy of that rift is still felt today. One of Smithsonian Magazine's “Ten Best History Books of the Year” Gloria Steinem was quoted in 2015 (the New Yorker) as saying the National Women's Conference in 1977 "may take the prize as the most important event nobody knows about." After the United Nations established International Women's Year (IWY) in 1975, Congress mandated and funded state conferences to elect delegates to attend the National Women's Conference in Houston in 1977. At that conference, Bella Abzug, Steinem, and other feminists adopted a National Plan of Action, endorsing the hot-button issues of abortion rights, the Equal Rights Amendment, and gay rights--the latter a new issue in national politics. Across town, Phyllis Schlafly, Lottie Beth Hobbs, and the conservative women's movement held a massive rally to protest federally funded feminism and launch a Pro-Family movement. Although much has been written about the role that social issues have played in politics, little attention has been given to the historical impact of women activists on both sides. DIVIDED WE STAND reveals how the battle between feminists and their conservative challengers divided the nation as Democrats continued to support women's rights and Republicans cast themselves as the party of family values. The women's rights movement and the conservative women's movement have irrevocably affected the course of modern American history. We cannot fully understand the present without appreciating the events leading up to Houston and thereafter.
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The Rise and Fall of National Women's Hospital

A History

Author: Linda Bryder

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 1869408098

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 802

In this major history, Linda Bryder traces the annals of National Women’s Hospital over half a century in order to tell a wider story of reproductive health. She uses the varying perspectives of doctors, nurses, midwives, consumer groups, and patients to show how together their dialog shaped the nature of motherhood and women’s health in 20th-century New Zealand. Natural childbirth and rooming in, artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization, sterilization and abortion: women’s health and reproduction went through a revolution in the 20th century as scientific advances confronted ethical and political dilemmas. In New Zealand, the major site for this revolution was National Women’s Hospital. Established in Auckland in 1946, with a purpose-built building that opened in 1964, National Women’s was the home of medical breakthroughs scandals. This chronicle covers them all.
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To Secure These Rights

The Report of President Harry S. Truman's Committee on Civil Rights

Author: Steven F. Lawson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0312593945

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 7279

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The American Paradox: A History of the United States Since 1945

Author: Steven M. Gillon

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133309852

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4147

THE AMERICAN PARADOX emphasizes political participation and popular culture in recent American history. This reader's main theme is the relationship of Americans to their government, for example, how Americans as a people remain skeptical of big government even as they expect it to facilitate large programs such as Social Security. In addition to the author's vivid, accessible writing style, the Third Edition maintains its focus on the tension between popular culture and social realities, the dynamics of minority groups and their place in American society, and the ambivalent feelings of many Americans concerning the U.S.'s role in the world during the postwar period. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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Feminist Collections

A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Feminism

Page: N.A

View: 9084

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Japanese Americans and World War II

Mass Removal, Imprisonment, and Redress

Author: Donald Teruo Hata,Nadine Ishitani Hata

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780882952482

Category: History

Page: 35

View: 6046

Like its predecessors, the third edition of "Japanese Americans and World War II" provides students of US, Asian American, World War II history with essential but too-often overlooked (at least in most standard US survey textbooks) information on what may well be one of the most disgraceful episodes in American history. Yet as painful as the details of the so-called internment of American citizens and legal immigrants was, "Japanese Americans in World War II" also chronicles the courage and resourcefulness of the Nikkei, during their imprisonment and in the years that followed, never abandoning the United States but demanding the respect they had earned -- even as they struggled within the Japanese American community to define exactly what "citizenship" meant and how best to ask for -- and get -- the official apology they had waited so long to hear. Completely updated and including a complete and expanded bibliography, this highly readable and affordable little pamphlet is a perfect supplement to the US survey and a variety of more-specialised courses.
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