The African American Newspaper

Voice of Freedom

Author: Patrick S. Washburn,Medill School of Journalism

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810122901

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 6222

Winner, 2007 Tankard Award In March of 1827 the nation's first black newspaper appeared in New York City--to counter attacks on blacks by the city's other papers. From this signal event, The African American Newspaper traces the evolution of the black newspaper--and its ultimate decline--for more than 160 years until the end of the twentieth century. The book chronicles the growth of the black press into a powerful and effective national voice for African Americans during the period from 1910 to 1950--a period that proved critical to the formation and gathering strength of the civil rights movement that emerged so forcefully in the following decades. In particular, author Patrick S. Washburn explores how the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender led the way as the two most influential black newspapers in U.S. history, effectively setting the stage for the civil rights movement's successes. Washburn also examines the numerous reasons for the enormous decline of black newspapers in influence and circulation in the decades immediately following World War II. His book documents as never before how the press's singular accomplishments provide a unique record of all areas of black history and a significant and shaping affect on the black experience in America.
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Freedom's Journal

The First African-American Newspaper

Author: Jacqueline Bacon

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739118948

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 325

View: 8794

Freedom's Journal is a comprehensive study of the first African-American newspaper, which was founded in the first half of the 19th Century. The book investigates all aspects of publication as well as using the source material to extract information about African-American life at that time.
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The Black Newspaper and the Chosen Nation

Author: Benjamin Fagan

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820349402

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 3914

The Black Newspaper and the Chosen Nation shows how antebellum African Americans used the newspaper as a means for translating their belief in black "chosenness" into plans and programs for black liberation. During the decades leading up to the Civil War, the idea that God had marked black Americans as his chosen people on earth became a central article of faith in northern black communities, with black newspaper editors articulating it in their journals. Benjamin Fagan shows how the early black press helped shape the relationship between black chosenness and the struggles for black freedom and equality in America, in the process transforming the very notion of a chosen American nation. Exploring how cultures of print helped antebellum black Americans apply their faith to struggles grand and small, The Black Newspaper and the Chosen Nation uses the vast and neglected archive of the early black press to shed new light on many of the central figures and questions of African American studies.
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Finding and Using African American Newspapers

Author: Timothy N. Pinnick

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780944619858

Category: African American newspapers

Page: 71

View: 3447

Finally a book has come along that addresses the difficult topic of African American newspaper research. Are there actually black newspapers out there? How do I locate them? Is there much in them aside from obituaries? Finding and Using African American Newspapers demystifies the process of locating these newspapers and provides researchers with a plethora of tips and strategies on how to track down those genealogically rich social columns.
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Bibliographic Checklist of African American Newspapers

Author: Barbara K. Henritze

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN: 0806314575

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 206

View: 8578

This book contains a complete checklist of African American newspapers identified in all major bibliographic sources--newspaper directories, union lists, finding aids, African American bibliographies, yearbooks, and specifically African American newspaper sources--a total of 5,539 newspapers. For reference purposes the text is arranged in tabular format under the following headings: newspaper title, city and state of publication, frequency of publication, dates, and sources. Newspapers are listed by state and city, which are in alphabetical order, then, by city, in alphabetical order by title. The papers are again listed alphabetically in the index, this time in a single, comprehensive list.--From publisher description.
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The Baltimore Afro-American, 1892-1950

Author: Hayward Farrar

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313305177

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 8014

Examines the Baltimore Afro-American from its founding in 1892 to the dawn of the Civil Rights Era in 1950.
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The Defender

How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America

Author: Ethan Michaeli

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547560877

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9169

“An extraordinary history…Deeply researched, elegantly written…a towering achievement that will not be soon forgotten.”—Brent Staples, New York Times Book Review “[This] epic, meticulously detailed account not only reminds its readers that newspapers matter, but so do black lives, past and present.”—USA Today Giving voice to the voiceless, TheChicago Defender condemned Jim Crow, catalyzed the Great Migration, and focused the electoral power of black America. Robert S. Abbott founded The Defender in 1905, smuggled hundreds of thousands of copies into the most isolated communities in the segregated South, becoming one of the first black millionaires in the process. His successor wielded the newspaper’s clout to elect mayors and presidents, including Harry S. Truman and John F. Kennedy, who would have lost in 1960 if not for TheDefender’s support. Drawing on dozens of interviews and extensive archival research, Ethan Michaeli constructs a revelatory narrative of race in America and brings to life the reporters who braved lynch mobs and policemen’s clubs to do their jobs, from the age of Teddy Roosevelt to the age of Barack Obama.
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African American Almanac

400 Years of Triumph, Courage and Excellence

Author: Lean'tin Bracks

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 1578593808

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 2266

The most complete and affordable singlevolume reference of African American culture available today, this almanac is a unique and valuable resource devoted to illustrating and demystifying the moving, difficult, and often lost history of black life in America. A legacy of pride, struggle, and triumph spanning more than 400 years is presented through a fascinating mix of biographies—including more than 750 influential figures—littleknown or misunderstood historical facts, enlightening essays on significant legislation and movements, and 150 rare photographs and illustrations. Covering events surrounding the civil rights movement; African American literature, art, and music; religion within the black community; and advances in science and medicine, this reference connects history to the issues currently facing the African American community and provides a range of information on society and culture.
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Black Entertainers in African American Newspaper Articles: An annotated bibliography of the Chicago defender, the Afro-American (Baltimore), the Los Angeles sentinel, and the New York Amsterdam news, 1910-1950

Author: Charlene B. Regester

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 711

View: 5284

All forms of American entertainment have been influenced by the participation of African Americans, and some forms have been invented by them, yet for much history that influence and those inventions went undocumented in the white press. For the first half of the twentieth century, the best coverage of blacks in entertainment-especially the developing motion picture industry-was in the newspapers published and circulated by the African American community. This annotated bibliography offers easy access to that coverage in four of the most influential black newspapers in the period from 1910 to 1950: the Chicago Defender, the Afro-American (Baltimore), the Los Angeles Sentinel and the New York Amsterdam News. The chronological arrangement allows the reader to trace developments in entertainment from the early days of motion pictures to mid-century. Quotations from the articles offer a taste of each newspaper's style, and extensive indexing provides quick access to names, titles, and subjects, making the book an invaluable aid to researchers.
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Smoketown

The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance

Author: Mark Whitaker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501122398

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6745

“Smoketown brilliantly offers us a chance to see this other black renaissance and spend time with the many luminaries who sparked it…It’s thanks to such a gifted storyteller as Whitaker that this forgotten chapter of American history can finally be told in all its vibrancy and glory.”—The New York Times Book Review The other great Renaissance of black culture, influence, and glamour burst forth joyfully in what may seem an unlikely place—Pittsburgh, PA—from the 1920s through the 1950s. Today black Pittsburgh is known as the setting for August Wilson’s famed plays about noble but doomed working-class strivers. But this community once had an impact on American history that rivaled the far larger black worlds of Harlem and Chicago. It published the most widely read black newspaper in the country, urging black voters to switch from the Republican to the Democratic Party and then rallying black support for World War II. It fielded two of the greatest baseball teams of the Negro Leagues and introduced Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Pittsburgh was the childhood home of jazz pioneers Billy Strayhorn, Billy Eckstine, Earl Hines, Mary Lou Williams, and Erroll Garner; Hall of Fame slugger Josh Gibson—and August Wilson himself. Some of the most glittering figures of the era were changed forever by the time they spent in the city, from Joe Louis and Satchel Paige to Duke Ellington and Lena Horne. Mark Whitaker’s Smoketown is a captivating portrait of this unsung community and a vital addition to the story of black America. It depicts how ambitious Southern migrants were drawn to a steel-making city on a strategic river junction; how they were shaped by its schools and a spirit of commerce with roots in the Gilded Age; and how their world was eventually destroyed by industrial decline and urban renewal. Whitaker takes readers on a rousing, revelatory journey—and offers a timely reminder that Black History is not all bleak.
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Black Newspapers and America's War for Democracy, 1914-1920

Author: William G. Jordan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080787552X

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 4797

During World War I, the publishers of America's crusading black newspapers faced a difficult dilemma. Would it be better to advance the interests of African Americans by affirming their patriotism and offering support of President Wilson's war for democracy in Europe, or should they demand that the government take concrete steps to stop the lynching, segregation, and disfranchisement of blacks at home as a condition of their participation in the war? This study of their efforts to resolve that dilemma offers important insights into the nature of black protest, race relations, and the role of the press in a republican system. William Jordan shows that before, during, and after the war, the black press engaged in a delicate and dangerous dance with the federal government and white America--at times making demands or holding firm, sometimes pledging loyalty, occasionally giving in. But although others have argued that the black press compromised too much, Jordan demonstrates that, given the circumstances, its strategic combination of protest and accommodation was remarkably effective. While resisting persistent threats of censorship, the black press consistently worked at educating America about the need for racial justice.
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The African American Press in World War II

Toward Victory at Home and Abroad

Author: Paul Alkebulan

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739190776

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 2563

The African American Press in World War II: Toward Victory at Home and Abroad thoroughly explores the diverse nature of the wartime African American press at home and its groundbreaking international coverage. This effort enhanced the black press’s influence, increased interest in the press in general, and greatly improved circulation figures.
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African Americans and the Haitian Revolution

Selected Essays and Historical Documents

Author: Maurice Jackson,Jacqueline Bacon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134726139

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 7954

Bringing together scholarly essays and helpfully annotated primary documents, African Americans and the Haitian Revolution collects not only the best recent scholarship on the subject, but also showcases the primary texts written by African Americans about the Haitian Revolution. Rather than being about the revolution itself, this collection attempts to show how the events in Haiti served to galvanize African Americans to think about themselves and to act in accordance with their beliefs, and contributes to the study of African Americans in the wider Atlantic World.
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African American Actresses

The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960

Author: Charlene B. Regester

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253221927

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 405

View: 4859

Nine actresses, from Madame Sul-Te-Wan in Birth of a Nation (1915) to Ethel Waters in Member of the Wedding (1952), are profiled in African American Actresses. Charlene Regester poses questions about prevailing racial politics, on-screen and off-screen identities, and black stardom and white stardom. She reveals how these women fought for their roles as well as what they compromised (or didn't compromise). Regester repositions these actresses to highlight their contributions to cinema in the first half of the 20th century, taking an informed theoretical, historical, and critical approach.
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African American Women in the News

Gender, Race, and Class in Journalism

Author: Marian Meyers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135279942

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 165

View: 9348

African American Women in the News offers the first in-depth examination of the varied representations of Black women in American journalism, from analyses of coverage of domestic abuse and "crack mothers" to exploration of new media coverage of Michelle Obama on Youtube. Marian Meyers interrogates the complex and often contradictory images of African American women in news media through detailed studies of national and local news, the mainstream and Black press, and traditional news outlets as well as newer digital platforms. She argues that previous studies of African Americans and the news have largely ignored the representations of women as distinct from men, and the ways in which socioeconomic class can be a determining factor in how Black women are portrayed in the news. Meyers also proposes that a pattern of paternalistic racism, as distinct from the "modern" racism found in previous studies of news coverage of African Americans, is more likely to characterize the media's treatment of African American women. Drawing on critical cultural studies and black feminist theory concerning representation and the intersectionality of gender, race and class, Meyers goes beyond the cultural myths and stereotypes of African American women to provide an updated portrayal of Black women today. African American Women in the News is ideal for courses on African American studies, American studies, journalism studies, media studies, sociology studies, women’s studies and for professional journalists and students of journalism who seek to improve the diversity and sensitivity of their journalistic practice.
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Stylin'

African American Expressive Culture from Its Beginnings to the Zoot Suit

Author: Shane White,Graham J. White

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801482830

Category: Social Science

Page: 301

View: 2701

Describes African American clothing, hairstyles, gesture, and movement from slavery to the 1940s, and argues that they represented a form of self-expression and covert resistance to racism.
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Caribbean Crossing

African Americans and the Haitian Emigration Movement

Author: Sara Fanning

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814770878

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4303

Shortly after winning its independence in 1804, Haiti’s leaders realized that if their nation was to survive, it needed to build strong diplomatic bonds with other nations. Haiti’s first leaders looked especially hard at the United States, which had a sizeable free black population that included vocal champions of black emigration and colonization. In the 1820s, President Jean-Pierre Boyer helped facilitate a migration of thousands of black Americans to Haiti with promises of ample land, rich commercial prospects, and most importantly, a black state. His ideas struck a chord with both blacks and whites in America. Journalists and black community leaders advertised emigration to Haiti as a way for African Americans to resist discrimination and show the world that the black race could be an equal on the world stage, while antislavery whites sought to support a nation founded by liberated slaves. Black and white businessmen were excited by trade potential, and racist whites viewed Haiti has a way to export the race problem that plagued America. By the end of the decade, black Americans migration to Haiti began to ebb as emigrants realized that the Caribbean republic wasn’t the black Eden they’d anticipated. Caribbean Crossing documents the rise and fall of the campaign for black emigration to Haiti, drawing on a variety of archival sources to share the rich voices of the emigrants themselves. Using letters, diary accounts, travelers’ reports, newspaper articles, and American, British, and French consulate records, Sara Fanning profiles the emigrants and analyzes the diverse motivations that fueled this unique early moment in both American and Haitian history.
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Germans and African Americans

Two Centuries of Exchange

Author: Larry A. Greene,Anke Ortlepp

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604737851

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1820

Germans and African Americans, unlike other works on African Americans in Europe, examines the relationship between African Americans and one country, Germany, in great depth. Germans and African Americans encountered one another within the context of their national identities and group experiences. In the nineteenth century, German immigrants to America and to such communities as Charleston and Cincinnati interacted within the boundaries of their old-world experiences and ideas and within surrounding regional notions of a nation fracturing over slavery. In the post-Civil War era in America through the Weimar era, Germany became a place to which African American entertainers, travelers, and intellectuals such as W. E. B. Du Bois could go to escape American racism and find new opportunities. With the rise of the Third Reich, Germany became the personification of racism, and African Americans in the 1930s and 1940s could use Hitler's evil example to goad America about its own racist practices. Postwar West Germany regained the image as a land more tolerant to African American soldiers than America. African Americans were important to Cold War discourse, especially in the internal ideological struggle between Communist East Germany and democratic West Germany. Unlike many other countries in Europe, Germany has played a variety of different and conflicting roles in the African American narrative and relationship with Europe. It is this diversity of roles that adds to the complexity of African American and German interactions and mutual perceptions over time.
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