Submarine Telegraphy and the Hunt for Gutta Percha

Challenge and Opportunity in a Global Trade

Author: Helen Godfrey

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004357289

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 2779

In Submarine Telegraphy and the Hunt for Gutta Percha, Helen Godfrey traces the connections between submarine telegraphy and the peoples of Singapore and Sarawak (Borneo) who supplied 'gutta percha', the latex used as insulation for the world’s undersea telegraph cables.
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Pursuing Power and Light

Technology and Physics from James Watt to Albert Einstein

Author: Bruce J. Hunt

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801898315

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 9382

Hunt translates his often-demanding material into engaging and accessible language suitable for undergraduate students of the history of science and technology.
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The Morals of Measurement

Accuracy, Irony, and Trust in Late Victorian Electrical Practice

Author: G. J. N. Gooday,Graeme J. N. Gooday

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521430982

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 5710

The Morals of Measurement is a contribution to the social histories of quantification and electrical technology in nineteenth-century Britain, Germany and France. It shows how the advent of commercial electrical lighting stimulated the industrialization of electrical measurement from a skilled labour-intensive activity to a mechanized practice. Challenging traditional accounts that focus on the metrological standards used in measurement, this book shows the central importance of trust when measurement was undertaken in an increasingly complex division of labour. Alongside ambiguities about the very nature of measurement and the respective responsibilities of humans and technologies in generating error-free numbers, the book also addresses controversies over the changing identity of the measurer through the themes of body, gender and authorship. The reader will gain fresh insights into a period when measurement was widely treated as the definitive means of gaining knowledge of the world.
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The Maxwellians

Author: Bruce J. Hunt

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801482342

Category: Science

Page: 266

View: 3748

James Clerk Maxwell published the Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1873. At his death, six years later, his theory of the electromagnetic field was neither well understood nor widely accepted. By the mid-1890s, however, it was regarded as one of the most fundamental and fruitful of all physical theories. Bruce J. Hunt examines the joint work of a group of young British physicists—G. F. FitzGerald, Oliver Heaviside, and Oliver Lodge—along with a key German contributor, Heinrich Hertz. It was these "Maxwellians" who transformed the fertile but half-finished ideas presented in the Treatise into the concise and powerful system now known as "Maxwell's theory."
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Mechanics Magazine

Author: John I Knight

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2679

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The New Larned History for Ready Reference, Reading and Research

The Actual Words of the World's Best Historians, Biographers and Specialists; a Complete System of History for All Uses, Extending to All Countries and Subjects and Representing the Better and Newer Literature of History

Author: Josephus Nelson Larned

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 330

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A Victorian Scientist and Engineer

Fleeming Jenkin and the Birth of Electrical Engineering

Author: Gillian Cookson,Colin Hempstead

Publisher: Ashgate Pub Limited

ISBN: 9780754600794

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 217

View: 8813

In a life of only 52 years, Fleeming Jenkin established his reputation as a pioneer in the new world of electrical engineering, known for his work on undersea telegraphs and later on the electrical transportation system known as telpherage. Equally at ease in the realms of theory and practice, from 1850 until his death in 1885 Jenkin engaged in every field of Victorian engineering. As a young adult he worked on intercontinental submarine telegraphy, the cutting edge technology of its day which was inextricably bound to the new science of electricity.Jenkin was both a scientist and an engineer, a prototype of the modern experimental research engineer. Yet in spite of his influence as an early electrical engineer and his other intellectual achievements, despite the celebrity of his associates - Robert Louis Stevenson, Mrs Gaskell and leading engineers of the day were among his close friends - and the way that submarine telegraphs seized the Victorian popular imagination, Jenkin himself has remained an obscure figure. He deserves to be better known. The story of Jenkin is of a life lived to the full. It illuminates many aspects of Victorian intellectual society, and of the organisation of science and engineering in his time. The central purpose of this biography is to show Jenkin's achievements in engineering and in other fields, and to judge his significance in these diverse activities.
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